Detailed Cardiac - Atrioventricular Canal

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This content was contributed by Prof Robert H. Anderson.


Anderson RH. Teratogenecity in the setting of cardiac development and maldevelopment. (2016)

Please note that the content is still at the early draft stage and will be the basis of updating the online cardiac development information with a more detailed description as shown by the page links below (shown in red if not yet existing).

Detailed Cardiac: Systemic Venous Sinus | Pulmonary Vein | Superior Interatrial Fold | Atrioventricular Cushions | Atrioventricular Canal | Interventricular Communication | Subpulmonary Infundibulum | Arterial Roots | Intrapericardial Arterial Trunks | Extrapericardial Arterial Channels | Sinus Node | Atrioventricular Conduction Axis


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1902 Vena cava inferior | 1905 Brain Blood Vessels | 1909 Cervical Veins | 1909 Dorsal aorta and umbilical veins | 1912 Heart | 1912 Human Heart | 1914 Earliest Blood-Vessels | 1915 Congenital Cardiac Disease | 1915 Dura Venous Sinuses | 1916 Blood cell origin | 1916 Pars Membranacea Septi | 1919 Lower Limb Arteries | 1921 Human Brain Vascular | 1921 Spleen | 1922 Aortic-Arch System | 1922 Pig Forelimb Arteries | 1922 Chicken Pulmonary | 1923 Head Subcutaneous Plexus | 1923 Ductus Venosus | 1925 Venous Development | 1927 Stage 11 Heart | 1928 Heart Blood Flow | 1935 Aorta | 1935 Venous valves | 1938 Pars Membranacea Septi | 1938 Foramen Ovale | 1939 Atrio-Ventricular Valves | 1940 Vena cava inferior | 1940 Early Hematopoiesis | 1941 Blood Formation | 1942 Truncus and Conus Partitioning | Ziegler Heart Models | 1951 Heart Movie | 1954 Week 9 Heart | 1957 Cranial venous system | 1959 Brain Arterial Anastomoses | Historic Embryology Papers | 2012 ECHO Meeting | 2016 Cardiac Review | Historic Disclaimer


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Detailed Cardiac: Systemic Venous Sinus | Pulmonary Vein | Superior Interatrial Fold | Atrioventricular Cushions | Atrioventricular Canal | Interventricular Communication | Subpulmonary Infundibulum | Arterial Roots | Intrapericardial Arterial Trunks | Extrapericardial Arterial Channels | Sinus Node | Atrioventricular Conduction Axis

Expansion of the Atrioventricular Canal

By Robert H. Anderson

As indicated above, the next crucial event in cardiac development is rightward expansion of the atrioventricular canal. It was rightward shift of the systemic venous tributaries that brought all the blood from the developing embryo back to the right half of the common atrial chamber. The rightward expansion of the atrioventricular canal, occurring during the latter half of the fifth week of development in the human, and early on E11.5 in the mouse, now brings the cavity of the right atrium into direct continuity with the right ventricle, and thus produces the right ventricular inlet component (Figure 12).

Anderson2016-fig12a.jpgAnderson2016-fig12b.jpg

Fig. 12. The left hand image is from an episcopic dataset prepared from a developing mouse embryo early on E11.5. The section is taken in so-called “four chamber” plane. The atrioventricular canal has expanded rightward so that the right atrium is now in direct continuity (white arrow) with the developing right ventricle (RV). There has also been growth of the primary atrial septum, with the primary foramen now seen between its leading edge, which is capped by mesenchyme, and the cranial margin of the inferior atrioventricular (AV) cushions. Note that there is also a space between the caudal edge of the cushion and the crest of the muscular ventricular septum. This is the reorientated embryonic interventricular foramen. The right hand panel is a histological section, again taken in the so-called “four chamber plane”, from a human embryo at Carnegie stage 16, representing the end of the fifth week of development. As can be seen, it is directly comparable with the situation as shown in the mouse heart. The section in the human heart is taken between the atrioventricular cushions, which have yet to fuse at this stage of development. This shows that there is a large defect, well described as an atrioventricular septal defect, through which all four cardiac chambers are in free communication.


References




Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, December 7) Embryology Detailed Cardiac - Atrioventricular Canal. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Detailed_Cardiac_-_Atrioventricular_Canal

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