Scanning Electron Microscopy

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Introduction

Scanning Electron Microscopy (MyScope)
Human Embryo
(stage 12, week 4) SEM

The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was a development of the electron microscope. Unlike a light microscope, using light, the electron microscope uses a focussed beam of electrons to image materials. The first version of this technology was the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Some example SEM images are shown on this current page.


On this site the acronym "SEM" is used to denote a Scanning Electron Micrograph, the image produced by this form of microscopy.

A new technique called Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM) gives similar high resolution 3D images, using a scanning beam of He+ ions, from fixed tissue without the coating required for generating SEM images.[1]


Links: Category:Scanning EM

Microscopy Timeline

  • 1665 - Robert Hooke publishes Micrographia, a collection of biological micrographs.
  • 1674 - Anton van Leeuwenhoek improved simple microscope for biological specimens.
  • 1833 - Brown published a microscopic observation of orchids, describing the cell nucleus.
  • 1898 - Golgi first saw and described the Golgi apparatus by staining cells with silver nitrate.
  • 1931 - Ernst Ruska first transmission electron microscope, (TEM).
  • 1938 - Von Ardenne first scanning electron microscope (SEM)
  • 1965 - first commercial scanning electron microscopes.
  • 1986 - Ernst Ruska, Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer receive the Nobel Prize in Physics for invention of the electron microscope (ER) and scanning tunneling microscope (GB and HR).

Human Embryo SEM Images

There are a series of beautiful SEM images made available by Prof Kathy Sulik of the early developing human embryo between week 3 to 5 (Carnegie stage 7 to 14) available: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14.


Links: Stage 11 SEM images | Stage 12 SEM images | Stage 13 SEM images | Stage 14 SEM images | Category:Scanning EM
Carnegie Stages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | About Stages | Timeline

Other Species SEM Images

Sea urchin SEM01.jpg Sea urchin SEM02.jpg
Sea Urchin (2 cell stage) Sea Urchin (16 cell stage)
Chicken- PGC grown in vitro 01.jpg Hamster oocyte and spermatozoa.jpg
Chicken primordial germ cell (PGC) grown in vitro[2] Hamster oocyte and spermatozoa
Fly wild-type head.jpg Fly antennapedia head.jpg
Fly wild-type head Fly antennapedia head


Helium Ion Microscopy

Adult rat kidney glomerulus

A new technique called Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM) gives similar high resolution 3D images, using a scanning beam of He+ ions, from fixed tissue without the coating required for generating SEM images.


Some research images examples from the rat kidney.[1]



References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Rice WL, Van Hoek AN, Păunescu TG, Huynh C, Goetze B, Singh B, Scipioni L, Stern LA & Brown D. (2013). High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney. PLoS ONE , 8, e57051. PMID: 23505418 DOI.
  2. Choi JW, Kim S, Kim TM, Kim YM, Seo HW, Park TS, Jeong JW, Song G & Han JY. (2010). Basic fibroblast growth factor activates MEK/ERK cell signaling pathway and stimulates the proliferation of chicken primordial germ cells. PLoS ONE , 5, e12968. PMID: 20886037 DOI.

Reviews

Hollenberg MJ & Erickson AM. (1973). The scanning electron microscope: potential usefulness to biologists. A review. J. Histochem. Cytochem. , 21, 109-30. PMID: 4571700 DOI.

Stokes DJ. (2003). Recent advances in electron imaging, image interpretation and applications: environmental scanning electron microscopy. Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci , 361, 2771-87. PMID: 14667297 DOI.

Hollenberg MJ & Erickson AM. (1973). The scanning electron microscope: potential usefulness to biologists. A review. J. Histochem. Cytochem. , 21, 109-30. PMID: 4571700 DOI.

Articles

Sim KS, Ting HY, Lai MA & Tso CP. (2009). Improvement to the scanning electron microscope image colorization by adaptive tuning. J Microsc , 234, 243-50. PMID: 19493101 DOI.

Oho E, Sugawara T & Suzuki K. (2005). An improved scanning method based on characteristics of the human visual system for scanning electron microscopy. Scanning , 27, 170-5. PMID: 16089300

Pease DC & Porter KR. (1981). Electron microscopy and ultramicrotomy. J. Cell Biol. , 91, 287s-292s. PMID: 6798043

Search PubMed

Search Pubmed: Scanning Electron Microscopy

External Links

External Links Notice - The dynamic nature of the internet may mean that some of these listed links may no longer function. If the link no longer works search the web with the link text or name. Links to any external commercial sites are provided for information purposes only and should never be considered an endorsement. UNSW Embryology is provided as an educational resource with no clinical information or commercial affiliation.




Glossary Links

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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, July 17) Embryology Scanning Electron Microscopy. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Scanning_Electron_Microscopy

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© Dr Mark Hill 2019, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G