Abnormal Development - Maternal Obesity

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Introduction

African maternal obesity graph
African maternal obesity by country[1]


Environmental Links: Introduction | low folic acid | iodine deficiency | Nutrition | Drugs | Australian Drug Categories | USA Drug Categories | thalidomide | herbal drugs | Illegal Drugs | smoking | Fetal Alcohol Syndrome | TORCH | viral infection | bacterial infection | fungal infection | Zoonotic Infection | Toxoplasmosis | Malaria | Maternal Diabetes | Maternal Hypertension | maternal hyperthermia | Maternal Inflammation | Maternal Obesity | Hypoxia | Biological Toxins | Chemicals | heavy metals | radiation | Prenatal Diagnosis | Neonatal Diagnosis | International Classification of Diseases | Fetal Origins Hypothesis

Some Recent Findings

  • Maternal overweight and obesity in early pregnancy and risk of infant mortality: a population based cohort study in Sweden Maternal overweight and obesity in early pregnancy and risk of infant mortality: a population based cohort study in Sweden doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g6572 (Published 02 December 2014)</ref> "Maternal overweight and obesity are associated with increased risks of infant mortality due to increased mortality risk in term births and an increased prevalence of preterm births. Maternal overweight and obesity may be an important preventable risk factor for infant mortality in many countries."
  • Maternal overweight and obesity and risks of severe birth-asphyxia-related complications in term infants: a population-based cohort study in Sweden[2] Maternal overweight and obesity increase risks of pregnancy and delivery complications and neonatal mortality, but the mechanisms are unclear. The objective of the study was to investigate associations between maternal body mass index (BMI) in early pregnancy and severe asphyxia-related outcomes in infants delivered at term (≥37 weeks). ...Risks of severe asphyxia-related outcomes in term infants increase with maternal overweight and obesity. Given the high prevalence of the exposure and the severity of the outcomes studied, the results are of potential public health relevance and should be confirmed in other populations. Prevention of overweight and obesity in women of reproductive age is important to improve perinatal health."
  • Maternal obesity and risk of preterm delivery[3] "Preterm birth is a leading cause of infant mortality, morbidity, and long-term disability, and these risks increase with decreasing gestational age. Obesity increases the risk of preterm delivery, but the associations between overweight and obesity and subtypes of preterm delivery are not clear. ...In Sweden, maternal overweight and obesity during pregnancy were associated with increased risks of preterm delivery, especially extremely preterm delivery. These associations should be assessed in other populations."
More recent papers  
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Search term: Maternal Obesity

Padma Kaul, Samantha L Bowker, Anamaria Savu, Roseanne O Yeung, Lois E Donovan, Edmond A Ryan Association between maternal diabetes, being large for gestational age and breast-feeding on being overweight or obese in childhood. Diabetologia: 2018; PubMed 30421138

Meredith H Rose, Randi Streisand, Laura Aronow, Carrie Tully, Corby K Martin, Eleanor Mackey Preliminary Feasibility and Acceptability of the Remote Food Photography Method for Assessing Nutrition in Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes. Clin Pract Pediatr Psychol: 2018, 6(3);270-277 PubMed 30420940

Carmen Monthé-Drèze, Sheryl L Rifas-Shiman, Diane R Gold, Emily Oken, Sen Sarbattama Maternal obesity and offspring cognition: the role of inflammation. Pediatr. Res.: 2018; PubMed 30420706

L Jiang, S Q Yan, M L Geng, C L Gu, K Huang, H Cao, X Y Wu, F B Tao [The associations between nighttime sleep duration, bedtime and preschool children's obesity]. Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi: 2018, 52(11);1146-1151 PubMed 30419699

Sarah E Carsley, Laura N Anderson, Lesley Plumptre, Patricia C Parkin, Jonathon L Maguire, Catherine S Birken Severe Obesity, Obesity, and Cardiometabolic Risk in Children 0 to 6 Years of Age. Child Obes: 2017, 13(5);415-424 PubMed 30418801

References

  1. Wojcicki JM. (2014). The double burden household in sub-Saharan Africa: maternal overweight and obesity and childhood undernutrition from the year 2000: results from World Health Organization Data (WHO) and Demographic Health Surveys (DHS). BMC Public Health , 14, 1124. PMID: 25361562 DOI.
  2. Persson M, Johansson S, Villamor E & Cnattingius S. (2014). Maternal overweight and obesity and risks of severe birth-asphyxia-related complications in term infants: a population-based cohort study in Sweden. PLoS Med. , 11, e1001648. PMID: 24845218 DOI.
  3. Cnattingius S, Villamor E, Johansson S, Edstedt Bonamy AK, Persson M, Wikström AK & Granath F. (2013). Maternal obesity and risk of preterm delivery. JAMA , 309, 2362-70. PMID: 23757084 DOI.

Books

Kathleen M Rasmussen and Ann L Yaktine. Weight Gain During Pregnancy Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2009. ISBN-13: 978-0-309-13113-1 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK32813

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Articles

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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2018, November 14) Embryology Abnormal Development - Maternal Obesity. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Abnormal_Development_-_Maternal_Obesity

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© Dr Mark Hill 2018, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G