Abnormal Development - Hypertension

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Educational Use Only - Embryology is an educational resource for learning concepts in embryological development, no clinical information is provided and content should not be used for any other purpose.

Introduction

Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (maternal hypertension) can be environmental, genetic or of unknown causes, occurs in 2-3% (some say higher) of all pregnancies and has an increasing incidence associated with obesity. This page mainly focusses on the effects of hypertension on development, rather than the maternal health condition.

Hypertension has previously been grouped into 4 classes:[1]

  1. chronic hypertension
  2. preeclampsia-eclampsia
  3. preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension
  4. gestational hypertension (transient hypertension of pregnancy , chronic hypertension after GA 20 weeks)


Draft Page - Notice removed when completed.


Environmental Links: Introduction | Low Folic Acid | Iodine Deficiency | Nutrition | Drugs | Australian Drug Categories | USA Drug Categories | Thalidomide | Herbal Drugs | Illegal Drugs | Smoking | Fetal Alcohol Syndrome | TORCH Infections | Viral Infection | Bacterial Infection | Zoonotic Infection | Toxoplasmosis | Malaria | Maternal Diabetes | Maternal Hypertension | Maternal Hyperthermia | Maternal Inflammation | Maternal Obesity | Hypoxia | Biological Toxins | Chemicals | Heavy Metals | Radiation | Prenatal Diagnosis | Neonatal Diagnosis | International Classification of Diseases | Fetal Origins Hypothesis

Some Recent Findings

More recent papers  
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  • Therefore the list of references do not reflect any editorial selection of material based on content or relevance.
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References listed on the rest of the content page and the associated discussion page (listed under the publication year sub-headings) do include some editorial selection based upon both relevance and availability.

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Search term: Maternal Hypertension

Sarwat I Gilani, Ulrik Dolberg Anderson, Muthuvel Jayachandran, Tracey L Weissgerber, Ladan Zand, Wendy M White, Natasa Milic, Maria Lourdes Gonzalez Suarez, Rangit Reddy Vallapureddy, Åsa Nääv, Lena Erlandsson, John C Lieske, Joseph P Grande, Karl A Nath, Stefan R Hansson, Vesna D Garovic Urinary Extracellular Vesicles of Podocyte Origin and Renal Injury in Preeclampsia. J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.: 2017; PubMed 28729288

Dorit Paz Levy, Eyal Sheiner, Tamar Wainstock, Ruslan Sergienko, Daniella Landau, Asnat Walfisch Evidence that Children Born at Early Term (37-38-6/7 weeks) Are at Increased Risk for Diabetes and Obesity-related Disorders. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.: 2017; PubMed 28729012

Taline A S Amaral, Dayane T Ognibene, Lenize C R M Carvalho, Ana Paula M Rocha, Cristiane A Costa, Roberto S Moura, Angela C Resende Differential responses of mesenteric arterial bed to vasoactive substances in L-NAME-induced preeclampsia: Role of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Clin. Exp. Hypertens.: 2017;1-10 PubMed 28726518

D-D Shi, J-J Guo, L Zhou, N Wang Epigallocatechin gallate enhances treatment efficacy of oral nifedipine against pregnancy-induced severe pre-eclampsia: A double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled clinical study. J Clin Pharm Ther: 2017; PubMed 28726273

Ayako Inatomi, Jun Sasahara, Keisuke Ishii, Mistuda Nobuaki Prenatal diagnosis of premature constriction of the ductus arteriosus with tricuspid papillary muscle rupture: a case report. J Med Ultrason (2001): 2017; PubMed 28725980


Search term: Gestational Hypertension

Dorit Paz Levy, Eyal Sheiner, Tamar Wainstock, Ruslan Sergienko, Daniella Landau, Asnat Walfisch Evidence that Children Born at Early Term (37-38-6/7 weeks) Are at Increased Risk for Diabetes and Obesity-related Disorders. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.: 2017; PubMed 28729012

Taline A S Amaral, Dayane T Ognibene, Lenize C R M Carvalho, Ana Paula M Rocha, Cristiane A Costa, Roberto S Moura, Angela C Resende Differential responses of mesenteric arterial bed to vasoactive substances in L-NAME-induced preeclampsia: Role of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Clin. Exp. Hypertens.: 2017;1-10 PubMed 28726518

D-D Shi, J-J Guo, L Zhou, N Wang Epigallocatechin gallate enhances treatment efficacy of oral nifedipine against pregnancy-induced severe pre-eclampsia: A double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled clinical study. J Clin Pharm Ther: 2017; PubMed 28726273

Ayako Inatomi, Jun Sasahara, Keisuke Ishii, Mistuda Nobuaki Prenatal diagnosis of premature constriction of the ductus arteriosus with tricuspid papillary muscle rupture: a case report. J Med Ultrason (2001): 2017; PubMed 28725980

Zhihua Wan, Aifen Zhou, Huiping Zhu, Xiaofang Lin, Dan Hu, Songxu Peng, Bin Zhang, Yukai Du Maternal Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Hospital-based Case-control Study in Wuhan, China. J. Clin. Gastroenterol.: 2017; PubMed 28723858


Search term: Preeclampsia

Ana María Gómez, Lisseth Fernanda Marín Carrillo, Carol M Arévalo Correa, Oscar Mauricio Muñoz Velandia, Martín Alonso Rondón Sepúlveda, Jaime Luis Silva Herrera, Diana Cristina Henao Carrillo Maternal-Fetal Outcomes in 34 Pregnant Women with Type 1 Diabetes in Sensor-Augmented Insulin Pump Therapy. Diabetes Technol. Ther.: 2017, 19(7);417-422 PubMed 28731823

Sarwat I Gilani, Ulrik Dolberg Anderson, Muthuvel Jayachandran, Tracey L Weissgerber, Ladan Zand, Wendy M White, Natasa Milic, Maria Lourdes Gonzalez Suarez, Rangit Reddy Vallapureddy, Åsa Nääv, Lena Erlandsson, John C Lieske, Joseph P Grande, Karl A Nath, Stefan R Hansson, Vesna D Garovic Urinary Extracellular Vesicles of Podocyte Origin and Renal Injury in Preeclampsia. J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.: 2017; PubMed 28729288

Marysia S Tweet, Sharonne N Hayes, Elisabeth Codsi, Rajiv Gulati, Carl H Rose, Patricia J M Best Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection Associated With Pregnancy. J. Am. Coll. Cardiol.: 2017, 70(4);426-435 PubMed 28728686

Wei-Hong Qi, Ming-Yan Zheng, Chao Li, Lin Xu, Jin-E Xu Screening of differential proteins of placenta tissues in patients with pre-eclampsia by iTRAQ proteomics techniques. Minerva Med.: 2017, 108(5);389-395 PubMed 28728340

Liora Madar-Shapiro, Ido Karady, Alla Trahtenherts, Argryo Syngelaki, Ranjit Akolekar, Liona Poon, Ruth Cohen, Adi Sharabi-Nov, Berthold Huppertz, Marei Sammar, Kata Juhasz, Nandor Gabor Than, Zoltan Papp, Roberto Romero, Kypros H Nicolaides, Hamutal Meiri Predicting the Risk to Develop Preeclampsia in the First Trimester Combining Promoter Variant -98A/C of LGALS13 (Placental Protein 13), Black Ethnicity, Previous Preeclampsia, Obesity, and Maternal Age. Fetal. Diagn. Ther.: 2017; PubMed 28728156

Gestational Hypertension

Gestational hypertension was previously called pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and is the new onset of hypertension after 20 weeks of gestation.


Pre-Eclampsia

This condition is also known as gestational proteinuric hypertension and occurs in occurs in approximately 2 to 4% of all pregnancies. The pathogenesis of eclamptic convulsions remains unknown and women with a history of eclampsia are at increased risk of eclampsia (1-2%) and preeclampsia (22-35%) in subsequent pregnancies. "Magnesium sulfate is the drug of choice for reducing the rate of eclampsia developing intrapartum and immediately postpartum."(see Sibai BM. 2005).

Recent research using a large population study in Norway has shown a strong generational association such that daughters of women who had pre-eclampsia during pregnancy had more than twice the risk of pre-eclampsia themselves. The paper concludes "Maternal genes and fetal genes from either the mother or father may trigger pre-eclampsia. The maternal association is stronger than the fetal association. The familial association predicts more severe pre-eclampsia."[2]

References

  1. Alessia Mammaro, Sabina Carrara, Alessandro Cavaliere, Santina Ermito, Angela Dinatale, Elisa Maria Pappalardo, Mariapia Militello, Rosa Pedata Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. J Prenat Med: 2009, 3(1);1-5 PubMed 22439030
  2. Rolv Skjaerven, Lars J Vatten, Allen J Wilcox, Thorbjørn Rønning, Lorentz M Irgens, Rolv Terje Lie Recurrence of pre-eclampsia across generations: exploring fetal and maternal genetic components in a population based cohort. BMJ: 2005, 331(7521);877 PubMed 16169871

Reviews

Jennifer A Hutcheon, Sarka Lisonkova, K S Joseph Epidemiology of pre-eclampsia and the other hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol: 2011, 25(4);391-403 PubMed 21333604

Lawrence Leeman, Patricia Fontaine Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Am Fam Physician: 2008, 78(1);93-100 PubMed 18649616


Articles

A S Ahmad, S O Samuelsen Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and fetal death at different gestational lengths: a population study of 2 121 371 pregnancies. BJOG: 2012, 119(12);1521-8 PubMed 22925135

Alessia Mammaro, Sabina Carrara, Alessandro Cavaliere, Santina Ermito, Angela Dinatale, Elisa Maria Pappalardo, Mariapia Militello, Rosa Pedata Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. J Prenat Med: 2009, 3(1);1-5 PubMed 22439030


External Links

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Environmental Links: Introduction | Low Folic Acid | Iodine Deficiency | Nutrition | Drugs | Australian Drug Categories | USA Drug Categories | Thalidomide | Herbal Drugs | Illegal Drugs | Smoking | Fetal Alcohol Syndrome | TORCH Infections | Viral Infection | Bacterial Infection | Zoonotic Infection | Toxoplasmosis | Malaria | Maternal Diabetes | Maternal Hypertension | Maternal Hyperthermia | Maternal Inflammation | Maternal Obesity | Hypoxia | Biological Toxins | Chemicals | Heavy Metals | Radiation | Prenatal Diagnosis | Neonatal Diagnosis | International Classification of Diseases | Fetal Origins Hypothesis


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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. 2017 Embryology Abnormal Development - Hypertension. Retrieved July 22, 2017, from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Abnormal_Development_-_Hypertension

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© Dr Mark Hill 2017, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G