Abnormal Development - Hypertension

From Embryology
Embryology - 24 Oct 2017    Facebook link Pinterest link Twitter link  Expand to Translate  
Google Translate - select your language from the list shown below (this will open a new external page)

العربية | català | 中文 | 中國傳統的 | français | Deutsche | עִברִית | हिंदी | bahasa Indonesia | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | မြန်မာ | Pilipino | Polskie | português | ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਦੇ | Română | русский | Español | Swahili | Svensk | ไทย | Türkçe | اردو | ייִדיש | Tiếng Việt    These external translations are automated and may not be accurate. (More? About Translations)

Educational Use Only - Embryology is an educational resource for learning concepts in embryological development, no clinical information is provided and content should not be used for any other purpose.

Introduction

Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (maternal hypertension) can be environmental, genetic or of unknown causes, occurs in 2-3% (some say higher) of all pregnancies and has an increasing incidence associated with obesity. This page mainly focusses on the effects of hypertension on development, rather than the maternal health condition.

Hypertension has previously been grouped into 4 classes:[1]

  1. chronic hypertension
  2. preeclampsia-eclampsia
  3. preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension
  4. gestational hypertension (transient hypertension of pregnancy , chronic hypertension after GA 20 weeks)


Draft Page - Notice removed when completed.


Environmental Links: Introduction | Low Folic Acid | Iodine Deficiency | Nutrition | Drugs | Australian Drug Categories | USA Drug Categories | Thalidomide | Herbal Drugs | Illegal Drugs | Smoking | Fetal Alcohol Syndrome | TORCH Infections | Viral Infection | Bacterial Infection | Zoonotic Infection | Toxoplasmosis | Malaria | Maternal Diabetes | Maternal Hypertension | Maternal Hyperthermia | Maternal Inflammation | Maternal Obesity | Hypoxia | Biological Toxins | Chemicals | Heavy Metals | Radiation | Prenatal Diagnosis | Neonatal Diagnosis | International Classification of Diseases | Fetal Origins Hypothesis

Some Recent Findings

More recent papers  
Mark Hill.jpg
PubMed logo.gif

This table shows an automated computer PubMed search using the listed sub-heading term.

  • Therefore the list of references do not reflect any editorial selection of material based on content or relevance.
  • References appear in this list based upon the date of the actual page viewing.

References listed on the rest of the content page and the associated discussion page (listed under the publication year sub-headings) do include some editorial selection based upon both relevance and availability.

Links: References | Discussion Page | Pubmed Most Recent | Journal Searches


Search term: Maternal Hypertension

Carla Assaf-Balut, Nuria García de la Torre, Alejandra Durán, Manuel Fuentes, Elena Bordiú, Laura Del Valle, Cristina Familiar, Ana Ortolá, Inés Jiménez, Miguel A Herraiz, Nuria Izquierdo, Noelia Perez, María J Torrejon, María I Ortega, Francisco J Illana, Isabelle Runkle, Maria P de Miguel, Carmen Montañez, Ana Barabash, Martín Cuesta, Miguel A Rubio, Alfonso L Calle-Pascual A Mediterranean diet with additional extra virgin olive oil and pistachios reduces the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM): A randomized controlled trial: The St. Carlos GDM prevention study. PLoS ONE: 2017, 12(10);e0185873 PubMed 29049303

Jean F Regal, Richard M Burwick, Sherry D Fleming The Complement System and Preeclampsia. Curr. Hypertens. Rep.: 2017, 19(11);87 PubMed 29046976

Baojian Xue, Terry G Beltz, Fang Guo, Alan Kim Johnson Sex Differences in Maternal Gestational Hypertension-Induced Sensitization of Angiotensin II Hypertension in Rat Offspring: the Protective Effect of Estrogen. Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.: 2017;ajpregu.00216.2017 PubMed 29046315

Alvarado Socarras Jorge, Castro M Javier, Fredi Alexander Diaz-Quijano Inhaled Nitric Oxide in preterm Neonates with refractory hypoxemia associated to oligohydramnios. Curr Drug Discov Technol: 2017; PubMed 29046161

Joanna Tieu, Suzette Coat, William Hague, Philippa Middleton, Emily Shepherd Oral anti-diabetic agents for women with established diabetes/impaired glucose tolerance or previous gestational diabetes planning pregnancy, or pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes. Cochrane Database Syst Rev: 2017, 10;CD007724 PubMed 29045765


Search term: Gestational Hypertension

Carla Assaf-Balut, Nuria García de la Torre, Alejandra Durán, Manuel Fuentes, Elena Bordiú, Laura Del Valle, Cristina Familiar, Ana Ortolá, Inés Jiménez, Miguel A Herraiz, Nuria Izquierdo, Noelia Perez, María J Torrejon, María I Ortega, Francisco J Illana, Isabelle Runkle, Maria P de Miguel, Carmen Montañez, Ana Barabash, Martín Cuesta, Miguel A Rubio, Alfonso L Calle-Pascual A Mediterranean diet with additional extra virgin olive oil and pistachios reduces the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM): A randomized controlled trial: The St. Carlos GDM prevention study. PLoS ONE: 2017, 12(10);e0185873 PubMed 29049303

U Kanaan, B Srivatsa, J Huckaby, M Kelleman Association of unit-wide oxygen saturation target on incidence of pulmonary hypertension in very low birthweight premature infants. J Perinatol: 2017; PubMed 29048404

Kei Asayama, Yutaka Imai The impact of salt intake during and after pregnancy. Hypertens. Res.: 2017; PubMed 29046520

Baojian Xue, Terry G Beltz, Fang Guo, Alan Kim Johnson Sex Differences in Maternal Gestational Hypertension-Induced Sensitization of Angiotensin II Hypertension in Rat Offspring: the Protective Effect of Estrogen. Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.: 2017;ajpregu.00216.2017 PubMed 29046315

Joanna Tieu, Suzette Coat, William Hague, Philippa Middleton, Emily Shepherd Oral anti-diabetic agents for women with established diabetes/impaired glucose tolerance or previous gestational diabetes planning pregnancy, or pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes. Cochrane Database Syst Rev: 2017, 10;CD007724 PubMed 29045765


Search term: Preeclampsia

Bei Xu, Renuka Shanmugalingam, Katrina Chau, Suzanne Pears, Annemarie Hennessy, Angela Makris The effect of acetyl salicylic acid (Aspirin) on trophoblast-endothelial interaction in vitro. J. Reprod. Immunol.: 2017, 124;54-61 PubMed 29055792

Anne Brandolt Larré, Aline Parisotto, Bruna Fagundes Rockenbach, Débora Montenegro Pasin, Cláudia Capellari, Daniele Cristovão Escouto, Bartira Ercília Pinheiro da Costa, Carlos Eduardo Poli-de-Figueiredo Phosphodiesterases and preeclampsia. Med. Hypotheses: 2017, 108;94-100 PubMed 29055408

Julia M Santos, Jung-A Park, Aby Joiakim, David A Putt, Robert N Taylor, Hyesook Kim The role of soluble epoxide hydrolase in preeclampsia. Med. Hypotheses: 2017, 108;81-85 PubMed 29055406

Marise M Wagner, Jantien Visser, Harjo Verburg, Chantal W P M Hukkelhoven, Jan M M van Lith, Kitty W M Bloemenkamp Pregnancy prior to recurrent pregnancy loss more often complicated by post-term birth and perinatal death. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand: 2017; PubMed 29055052

Thomas Michael Weber, Helmut Karl Lackner, Andreas Roessler, Ilona Papousek, Vassiliki Kolovetsiou-Kreiner, Miha Lucovnik, Karin Schmid-Zalaudek, Uwe Lang, Manfred Georg Moertl Heart rate variability and baroreceptor reflex sensitivity in early- versus late-onset preeclampsia. PLoS ONE: 2017, 12(10);e0186521 PubMed 29053723

Gestational Hypertension

Gestational hypertension was previously called pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and is the new onset of hypertension after 20 weeks of gestation.


Pre-Eclampsia

This condition is also known as gestational proteinuric hypertension and occurs in occurs in approximately 2 to 4% of all pregnancies. The pathogenesis of eclamptic convulsions remains unknown and women with a history of eclampsia are at increased risk of eclampsia (1-2%) and preeclampsia (22-35%) in subsequent pregnancies. "Magnesium sulfate is the drug of choice for reducing the rate of eclampsia developing intrapartum and immediately postpartum."(see Sibai BM. 2005).

Recent research using a large population study in Norway has shown a strong generational association such that daughters of women who had pre-eclampsia during pregnancy had more than twice the risk of pre-eclampsia themselves. The paper concludes "Maternal genes and fetal genes from either the mother or father may trigger pre-eclampsia. The maternal association is stronger than the fetal association. The familial association predicts more severe pre-eclampsia."[2]

References

  1. Alessia Mammaro, Sabina Carrara, Alessandro Cavaliere, Santina Ermito, Angela Dinatale, Elisa Maria Pappalardo, Mariapia Militello, Rosa Pedata Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. J Prenat Med: 2009, 3(1);1-5 PubMed 22439030
  2. Rolv Skjaerven, Lars J Vatten, Allen J Wilcox, Thorbjørn Rønning, Lorentz M Irgens, Rolv Terje Lie Recurrence of pre-eclampsia across generations: exploring fetal and maternal genetic components in a population based cohort. BMJ: 2005, 331(7521);877 PubMed 16169871

Reviews

Jennifer A Hutcheon, Sarka Lisonkova, K S Joseph Epidemiology of pre-eclampsia and the other hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol: 2011, 25(4);391-403 PubMed 21333604

Lawrence Leeman, Patricia Fontaine Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Am Fam Physician: 2008, 78(1);93-100 PubMed 18649616


Articles

A S Ahmad, S O Samuelsen Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and fetal death at different gestational lengths: a population study of 2 121 371 pregnancies. BJOG: 2012, 119(12);1521-8 PubMed 22925135

Alessia Mammaro, Sabina Carrara, Alessandro Cavaliere, Santina Ermito, Angela Dinatale, Elisa Maria Pappalardo, Mariapia Militello, Rosa Pedata Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. J Prenat Med: 2009, 3(1);1-5 PubMed 22439030


External Links

External Links Notice - The dynamic nature of the internet may mean that some of these listed links may no longer function. If the link no longer works search the web with the link text or name. Links to any external commercial sites are provided for information purposes only and should never be considered an endorsement. UNSW Embryology is provided as an educational resource with no clinical information or commercial affiliation.


Environmental Links: Introduction | Low Folic Acid | Iodine Deficiency | Nutrition | Drugs | Australian Drug Categories | USA Drug Categories | Thalidomide | Herbal Drugs | Illegal Drugs | Smoking | Fetal Alcohol Syndrome | TORCH Infections | Viral Infection | Bacterial Infection | Zoonotic Infection | Toxoplasmosis | Malaria | Maternal Diabetes | Maternal Hypertension | Maternal Hyperthermia | Maternal Inflammation | Maternal Obesity | Hypoxia | Biological Toxins | Chemicals | Heavy Metals | Radiation | Prenatal Diagnosis | Neonatal Diagnosis | International Classification of Diseases | Fetal Origins Hypothesis


Glossary Links

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Numbers | Symbols



Cite this page: Hill, M.A. 2017 Embryology Abnormal Development - Hypertension. Retrieved October 24, 2017, from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Abnormal_Development_-_Hypertension

What Links Here?
© Dr Mark Hill 2017, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G