Europe Statistics

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Introduction

Europe

See also Germany, Spain and United Kingdom that currently also have separate statistical information pages on this site.


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Some Recent Findings

  • Paper 2: EUROCAT public health indicators for congenital anomalies in Europe.[1] "The purpose of this article is to present the specific public health indicators recently developed by EUROCAT that aim to summarize important aspects of the public health impact of congenital anomalies in a few quantitative measures. The six indicators are: (1) congenital anomaly perinatal mortality, (2) congenital anomaly prenatal diagnosis prevalence, (3) congenital anomaly termination of pregnancy, (4) Down syndrome livebirth prevalence, (5) congenital anomaly pediatric surgery, and (6) neural tube defects (NTD) total prevalence. Data presented for this report pertained to all cases (livebirths, fetal deaths, or stillbirths after 20 weeks of gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly [TOPFA]) of congenital anomaly from 27 full member registries of EUROCAT that could provide data for at least 3 years during the period 2004 to 2008. Prevalence of anomalies, prenatal diagnosis, TOPFA, pediatric surgery, and perinatal mortality were calculated per 1000 births."
  • The prevalence of congenital anomalies in Europe.[2]EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) is the network of population-based registers of congenital anomaly in Europe, with a common protocol and data quality review, covering 1.5 million annual births in 22 countries. EUROCAT recorded a total prevalence of major congenital anomalies of 23.9 per 1,000 births for 2003-2007. 80% were livebirths. 2.5% of livebirths with congenital anomaly died in the first week of life. 2.0% were stillbirths or fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation. 17.6% of all cases were terminations of pregnancy following prenatal diagnosis (TOPFA). Thus, congenital anomalies overwhelmingly concern children surviving the early neonatal period, who have important medical, social or educational needs. The prevalence of chromosomal anomalies was 3.6 per 1,000 births, contributing 28% of stillbirths/fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation with congenital anomaly, and 48% of all TOPFA. Congenital heart defects (CHD) were the most common non-chromosomal subgroup, at 6.5 per 1,000 births, followed by limb defects (3.8 per 1,000), anomalies of urinary system (3.1 per 1,000) and nervous system defects (2.3 per 1,000). In 2004, perinatal mortality associated with congenital anomaly was 0.93 per 1,000 births, and TOPFA 4.4 per 1,000 births, with considerable country variation. Primary prevention of congenital anomalies in the population based on controlling environmental risk factors is a crucial policy priority, including preconceptional care and whole population approaches."

Congenital Statistical Data

The following data is from a 2010 EUROCAT paper.[2]

  • total prevalence of major congenital anomalies of 23.9 per 1,000 births for 2003-2007.
    • 80% were livebirths.
    • 2.5% of livebirths with congenital anomaly died in the first week of life.
    • 2.0% were stillbirths or fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation.
  • 17.6% of all cases were terminations of pregnancy following prenatal diagnosis (TOPFA).
  • prevalence of chromosomal anomalies was 3.6 per 1,000 births.
    • contributing 28% of stillbirths/fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation with congenital anomaly
    • 48% of all TOPFA.
  • Congenital heart defects (CHD) were the most common non-chromosomal subgroup (6.5 per 1,000 births).
  • Limb defects (3.8 per 1,000)
  • Renal anomalies (3.1 per 1,000)
  • Neural defects (2.3 per 1,000).

2004 - perinatal mortality associated with congenital anomaly was 0.93 per 1,000 births, and TOPFA 4.4 per 1,000 births, with considerable country variation.

Malformation (non-chromosomal) Total Cases Cases Prenatally Diagnosed % of Total Cases
All Anomalies 75751 22573 30
Anencephalus and similar 1232 1185 96
Spina Bifida 1577 1288 82
Hydrocephalus 1914 1403 73
Transposition of great vessels 1188 454 38
Hypoplastic left heart 888 624 70
Cleft lip with or without palate 2857 1379 48
Diaphragmatic hernia 893 509 57
Gastroschisis 993 904 91
Omphalocele 730 596 82
Bilateral renal agenesis including Potter syndrome 392 343 88
Posterior urethral valve and/or prune belly 291 234 80
Limb reduction 1626 811 50
Club foot - talipes equinovarus 3678 1398 38
Malformation (non-chromosomal) Total Cases Cases Prenatally Diagnosed % of Total Cases
Chromosomal 12479 8765 70
Down Syndrome 7233 4538 63
Patau syndrome/trisomy 13 685 625 91
Edwards syndrome/trisomy 18 1709 1537 90

Data: EUROCAT Website Database http://www.eurocat-network.eu/PRENATALSCREENINGAndDIAGNOSIS/PrenatalDetectionRates data uploaded 04/12/2012

Denmark

Danish National Birth Cohort

The Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) is a large population study related to DOHAD theory, of the exposure during development influence fetal growth, cell divisions, and organ functioning, may have long-lasting impact on health and disease susceptibility.[3] More than 900 PubMed publications refer to the study data.

The Danish National Birth Cohort - its background, structure and aim[3]

"It is well known that the time from conception to early childhood has importance for health conditions that reach into later stages of life. Recent research supports this view, and diseases such as cardiovascular morbidity, cancer, mental illnesses, asthma, and allergy may all have component causes that act early in life. Exposures in this period, which influence fetal growth, cell divisions, and organ functioning, may have long-lasting impact on health and disease susceptibility.
"To investigate these issues the Danish National Birth Cohort (Better health for mother and child) was established. A large cohort of pregnant women with long-term follow-up of the offspring was the obvious choice because many of the exposures of interest cannot be reconstructed with sufficient validity back in time. The study needs to be large, and it is aimed to recruit 100,000 women early in pregnancy, and to continue follow-up for decades. The Nordic countries are better suited for this kind of research than most other countries because of their population-based registers on diseases, demography and social conditions, linkable at the individual level by means of the unique ID-number given to all citizens. Exposure information is mainly collected by computer-assisted telephone interviews with the women twice during pregnancy and when their children are six and 18 months old. Participants are also asked to fill in a self-administered food frequency questionnaire in mid-pregnancy. Furthermore, a biological bank has been set up with blood taken from the mother twice during pregnancy and blood from the umbilical cord taken shortly after birth. Data collection started in 1996 and the project covered all regions in Denmark in 1999. By August 2000. a total of 60,000 pregnant women had been recruited to the study. It is expected that a large number of gene-environmental hypotheses need to be based on case-control analyses within a cohort like this."


Links: DNBC

Germany

Population: 81,471,834 (July 2011 est.) country comparison to the world: 16

Infant mortality rate

  • total: 3.54 deaths/1,000 live births
  • country comparison to the world: 208
  • male: 3.84 deaths/1,000 live births
  • female: 3.21 deaths/1,000 live births (2011 est.)
Links:Germany

Italy

Brindisi, Italy

Congenital anomalies among live births in a polluted area[4]"Congenital anomalies and their primary prevention are a crucial public health issue. This work aimed to estimate the prevalence of congenital anomalies in Brindisi, a city in southeastern Italy at high risk of environmental crisis. This research concerned newborns up to 28 days of age, born between 2001 and 2010 to mothers resident in Brindisi and discharged with a diagnosis of congenital anomaly. ...Our findings indicated an increased prevalence of Congenital Anomalies (especially congenital heart diseases) in the city of Brindisi. More research is needed in order to analyze the role of factors potentially involved in the causation of congenital anomalies."


United Kingdom

Population: 62,698,362 (July 2011 est.) country comparison to the world: 22

Infant mortality rate

  • total: 4.62 deaths/1,000 live births country comparison to the world: 189
  • male: 5.07 deaths/1,000 live births
  • female: 4.15 deaths/1,000 live births (2011 est.)
Links: United Kingdom

References

  1. Khoshnood B, Greenlees R, Loane M & Dolk H. (2011). Paper 2: EUROCAT public health indicators for congenital anomalies in Europe. Birth Defects Res. Part A Clin. Mol. Teratol. , 91 Suppl 1, S16-22. PMID: 21381186 DOI.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Dolk H, Loane M & Garne E. (2010). The prevalence of congenital anomalies in Europe. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. , 686, 349-64. PMID: 20824455 DOI.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Olsen J, Melbye M, Olsen SF, Sørensen TI, Aaby P, Andersen AM, Taxbøl D, Hansen KD, Juhl M, Schow TB, Sørensen HT, Andresen J, Mortensen EL, Olesen AW & Søndergaard C. (2001). The Danish National Birth Cohort--its background, structure and aim. Scand J Public Health , 29, 300-7. PMID: 11775787
  4. Gianicolo EA, Bruni A, Rosati E, Sabina S, Guarino R, Padolecchia G, Leo C, Vigotti MA, Andreassi MG & Latini G. (2012). Congenital anomalies among live births in a polluted area. A ten-year retrospective study. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth , 12, 165. PMID: 23270371 DOI.


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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, March 24) Embryology Europe Statistics. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Europe_Statistics

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© Dr Mark Hill 2019, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G