Embryology History - George Streeter

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Introduction

George Linius Streeter
George Linius Streeter (1873-1948)
  • 1906–1907 - assistant professor at the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology in Philadelphia, then went to the University of Michigan as professor of gross anatomy.
  • 1914 - research professor in the department of embryology of the Carnegie Institution, at the Johns Hopkins Medical School under Franklin Paine Mall (1862 - 1917).
  • 1917 - Streeter succeeded Mall as director of the Carnegie Institution.
  • 1926–1928 - president of the American Association of Anatomists


"George Linius Streeter was generally recognized during the latter years of his life by the embryologists of the world as their leader in the study of human embryology. From 1914 until his death in 1948 he was connected with the Department of Embryology of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, of which he was Director for 23 years (1917-1940). So fully indeed did he plan and lead the work of the Baltimore embryological laboratory that his fame and that of his department are scarcely separable." (Biographical Memoir 1954)



Historic Embryology - In 1949 the embryologist George Streeter[1] used the replacement of cartilage within the humerus by bone marrow as an arbitrary definition of the embryo to fetus transition.
"If the onset can be recognized in a given specimen, that specimen is straightway classed as a fetus."
Embryology History George Streeter



Carnegie Institution of Embryology Directors: Franklin Mall (1914-1917) | Streeter (1917-1940) | George Corner (1940-)


Streeter also collaborated with:

  • Chester Henry Heuser (1885 - 1965) on the early embryology of the pig.
  • Chester Henry Heuser and Carl Gottfried Hartman (1879 - 1968) on the embryology of the rhesus monkey.



  Streeter Links: George Streeter | 1905 Cranial and Spinal Nerves | 1906 Membranous Labyrinth | 1908 Peripheral Nervous System 10mm Human | 1908 Cranial Nerves 10mm Human | 1912 Nervous System | 1917 Scala Tympani Scala Vestibuli and Perioticular Cistern | 1917 Ear Cartilaginous Capsule | 1918 Otic Capsule | 1919 Filum Terminale | 1920 Presomite Embryo | 1920 Human Embryo Growth | 1921 Brain Vascular | 1938 Early Primate Stages | 1941 Macaque embryo | 1945 Stage 13-14 | 1948 Stages 15-18 | 1949 Cartilage and Bone | 1951 Stages 19-23 | Contributions to Embryology | Historic Embryology Papers | Carnegie Stages | Category:George Streeter George Linius Streeter (1873-1948)


Embryologists: William Hunter | Wilhelm Roux | Caspar Wolff | Wilhelm His | Julius Kollmann | Hans Spemann | Charles Minot | Ambrosius Hubrecht | Charles Bardeen | Franz Keibel | Franklin Mall | Florence Sabin | George Streeter | George Corner | James Hill | Jan Florian | Thomas Bryce | Thomas Morgan | Ernest Frazer | Francisco Orts-Llorca | José Doménech Mateu | Frederic Lewis | Arthur Meyer | Erich Blechschmidt | Klaus Hinrichsen | Hideo Nishimura | Arthur Hertig | John Rock | Viktor Hamburger | Mary Lyon | Nicole Le Douarin | Robert Winston | Fabiola Müller | Ronan O'Rahilly | Robert Edwards | John Gurdon | Shinya Yamanaka | Embryology History | Category:People
Related Histology Researchers  
Santiago Ramón y Cajal | Camillo Golgi


1907 Anatomical Record

New Appointment

Dr. George L. Streeter, Associate Professor of Neurology, Wistar Institute of Anatomy Philadelphia, has been appointed professor of anatomy at the University of Michigan to succeed Professor McMurrich.


Dr. Streeter graduated in arts at Union College and in medicine at Columbia University. After graduation he studied anatomy under the direction of Professor Edinger at Frankfort, Professor Hertwig at Berlin, and the late Professor His at Leipzig. During the years 1903-06 he served successively as assistant and instructor in anatomy at the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Streeters investigations upon the structure and development of the central nervous system of man and of the ostrich, and also upon the development of the internal ear of man are familiar to readers of the American Journal of Anatomy. He has also published experimental studies on the development of the ear of the frog, in the Jour- nal of Experimental Zoology. These contributions have already gained recognition from the writers of several text-books upon anatomy and embryology, in which illustrations have been borrowed. The Wistar Institute has thus indicated another way in which it will aid the growth of anatomy in this country. While its own staff will feel the loss of Dr. Streeter's special capacity in technique and organization, and his stimulating influence in research, a valuable point is gained for the Institute when educational institutions of high standing seek professors from among its investigators.


Development Of The Interfore-Brain Commissures In The Human Embryo

By Geobge L. Stbeetek. Wistar Institute of Anatomy, Philadelphia.

A morphological study of the corpus callosum and the commissure of the hippocampus, based on a series of wax-plate reconstructions of human embryos varying from 80 to 150 mm. in length. All three structures cross the median line in that portion of the brain wall developed from the lamina terminalis. In 80 mm. embryos the corpus callosum consists of a round bundle of fibers lying directly on the commissure of the hippocampus, representing the condition found in non-placental animals. The succeeding growth consists in the lengthening of the fornix and caudal migration of the hippocampal commissure, the latter remaining in close relation to the caudal end of the corpus callosum, which in the meantime, by increase in number of fibers, has extended anterior to the anterior commissure and posterior so as to deck over the region of the third ventricle. The formation of a cavity in the septum lucidum occurs in embryos of about 95 mm. The anterior or olfactory division of the anterior commissure does not enter the olfactory bulb, but is traced to the cortex dorsal to the bulb.



Streeter-plate02.jpg

Human Embryo Brain Vascular System (1921).

Plate 2. The developmental alterations in the vascular system of the brain of the human embryo

Carnegie Collection, Embryo No. 588 Right and left profile views of a wax-plate reconstruction of the main arteries and veins in a human embryo 4 mm long. (Original plate enlargement about 40 diameters).

  • This stage illustrates the character of the first type of the circulation of the head and its relation to the other blood-vessels of the body.
  • The primary head-vein and its tributaries which form the main drainage-channels of the head as shown in blue.
  • These communicate by anastomosing loops with the capillary plexus everywhere investing the brain-wall, only patches of which are shown in the model.
  • The capillary plexus of the brain-wall is fed by arterial feeders, the stumps of which, as shown in the model, arise from the aortic system.
  • The trunk that persists as the internal carotid artery is already quite definite.

Selected References



Embryologists: William Hunter | Wilhelm Roux | Caspar Wolff | Wilhelm His | Julius Kollmann | Hans Spemann | Charles Minot | Ambrosius Hubrecht | Charles Bardeen | Franz Keibel | Franklin Mall | Florence Sabin | George Streeter | George Corner | James Hill | Jan Florian | Thomas Bryce | Thomas Morgan | Ernest Frazer | Francisco Orts-Llorca | José Doménech Mateu | Frederic Lewis | Arthur Meyer | Erich Blechschmidt | Klaus Hinrichsen | Hideo Nishimura | Arthur Hertig | John Rock | Viktor Hamburger | Mary Lyon | Nicole Le Douarin | Robert Winston | Fabiola Müller | Ronan O'Rahilly | Robert Edwards | John Gurdon | Shinya Yamanaka | Embryology History | Category:People
Related Histology Researchers  
Santiago Ramón y Cajal | Camillo Golgi


Search Pubmed: Streeter G


External Links

External Links Notice - The dynamic nature of the internet may mean that some of these listed links may no longer function. If the link no longer works search the web with the link text or name. Links to any external commercial sites are provided for information purposes only and should never be considered an endorsement. UNSW Embryology is provided as an educational resource with no clinical information or commercial affiliation.

  • Human Developmental Anatomy Center George Streeter - Biography
  • National Academy of Sciences GEORGE LINIUS STREETER 1873-1948 BY GEORGE W . CORNER Biographical Memoir 1954 PDF


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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2018, November 16) Embryology Embryology History - George Streeter. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Embryology_History_-_George_Streeter

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© Dr Mark Hill 2018, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G
  1. Streeter GL. Developmental horizons in human embryos (fourth issue). A review of the histogenesis of cartilage and bone. (1949) Carnegie Instn. Wash. Publ. 583, Contrib. Embryol., 33: 149-169. PMID: 18144445