Embryology History - George Corner

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A personal message from Dr Mark Hill (May 2020)  
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I have decided to take early retirement in September 2020. During the many years online I have received wonderful feedback from many readers, researchers and students interested in human embryology. I especially thank my research collaborators and contributors to the site. The good news is Embryology will remain online and I will continue my association with UNSW Australia. I look forward to updating and including the many exciting new discoveries in Embryology!

Introduction

George W Corner (1889 - 1981)
George Corner (1889 - 1981)

Prof. George W. Corner (1889 - 1981) was the third director of the Carnegie Institution of Embryology (Washington).

Carnegie Institution of Embryology Directors: Franklin Mall (1914-1917) | Streeter (1917-1940) | George Corner (1940-)


Carnegie Institute Staff 1935.jpg

Carnegie Institute Staff (1935) George Corner (third institute director) seated without a lab coat.


In 1964 he wrote a National Academy of Sciences biography for Warren H. Lewis.[1]


Links: Carnegie Collection | Carnegie Stages


Embryologists: William Hunter | Wilhelm Roux | Caspar Wolff | Wilhelm His | Oscar Hertwig | Julius Kollmann | Hans Spemann | Francis Balfour | Charles Minot | Ambrosius Hubrecht | Charles Bardeen | Franz Keibel | Franklin Mall | Florence Sabin | George Streeter | George Corner | James Hill | Jan Florian | Thomas Bryce | Thomas Morgan | Ernest Frazer | Francisco Orts-Llorca | José Doménech Mateu | Frederic Lewis | Arthur Meyer | Robert Meyer | Erich Blechschmidt | Klaus Hinrichsen | Hideo Nishimura | Arthur Hertig | John Rock | Viktor Hamburger | Mary Lyon | Nicole Le Douarin | Robert Winston | Fabiola Müller | Ronan O'Rahilly | Robert Edwards | John Gurdon | Shinya Yamanaka | Embryology History | Category:People
Related Histology Researchers  
Santiago Ramón y Cajal | Camillo Golgi

George Corner Jr.

Note there is also a George Corner Jr. who was a later clinical developmental researcher.[2]

NAS - A Biographical Memoir

Elizabeth M. Ramsey
Elizabeth M. Ramsey

by Elizabeth M. Ramsey

(excerpt describing the Carnegie Embryological Laboratory)

The Carnegie Embryological Laboratory

"Corner accepted this call in 1940 and returned to his native city, where he found a pleasant house and was surrounded by kinfolk and good friends. A pleasing welcome home was the invitation to be a trustee of the Samuel Ready School of which both his grandfather and father had been president. This too he accepted, becoming president himself in due course. Interestingly enough, George Streeter had also been a trustee of the Ready School.


At the Department of Embryology Corner inherited a small, well-organized, closely knit organization with a history of distinguished research behind it and important projects still in hand. Two of the senior staff members remained from the Streeter days. First, there was Carl Hartman, the famous “raccoon man” and director of the monkey colony. The colony was actually the lineal descendant of the one Corner established many years before on the balcony in the Hunterian Laboratory. Under Hartman it provided the embryos upon which he and Streeter and Chester Heuser constructed the brilliant demonstration of monkey development from the two-cell stage to the end of the embryonic period, the first such complete description in a primate. Hartman remained until 1941 when he went to the University of IIlinois in Chicago.


The second to remain was Chester Heuser, who stayed until his retirement, devoting his extensive knowledge of embryology and his masterly skill in dealing with young embryos to the preparation of the great Hertig-Rock embryos. That project, initiated by Streeter and enthusiastically continued by Corner, saw the famous pathologist-gynecologist team in Boston gradually obtain a complete series of human embryos representing almost every day of the first three weeks of gestation. The precious specimens were sent to Baltimore (often carried by hand for total safety) where Heuser prepared them for sectioning, modelling and eventual publication.


E. M. Ramsey’s study of the anatomy and physiology of placental vasculature, employing timed monkey pregnancies from Hartman’s colony and operative specimens from worldwide sources, was continued, Dr. Corner himself performing the vascular injections in several cases, a use of his unforgotten surgical skills which he greatly enjoyed.


To fill the gaps in the staff of the department, Corner brought to Baltimore his senior colleague and close personal friend, Robert Kyle Burns, Louis B. Flexner from Weed’s department at Johns Hopkins, and Samuel R. M. Reynolds from Long Island Medical College.


With this core, unfinished business from Streeter’s period was continued and Corner reshaped the department toward the modern trends in experimental rather than morphological embryology, recognizing that the future basically lay in physiology, biochemistry, and biophysics.


World War II, however, interrupted peacetime activities when Corner was barely settled in. One day, early in the war, he called together the full scientific, technical, and custodial staff and told them that after much cogitation and following consultation with Carnegie Institution officers and trustees, the War Department, and various other advisors, he had been unable to find any way in which a department of embryology per se could be of service to the war effort. Therefore, the members of the department were advised to seek war work individually with the assurance that they would be welcomed back to their posts as soon as the war was over. Furthermore, during the interval, he himself would remain in Baltimore and do everything he could to keep pending research projects in “stand-by” condition, e.g., precious tissue cultures to be kept alive, equipment to be kept in operating shape, the monkey colony to be maintained, and so on. This he did in addition to responding to many calls for consultative, advisory and administrative services, and membership on wartime committees and commissions.


One staff member whose wartime job was in the Office of Medical Information of the National Research Council in Washington remembers a long-distance telephone call from Dr. Corner on one occasion, reporting that Monkey 940 would be 103 days pregnant later that week. Should he inject it with India ink according to the standard protocol, and if so, in what fixing fluid should the removed tissues be stored? Surely a remarkable wartime service to science as well as the country!


When the war was over and “normalcy” restored, research at the Department of Embryology went into high gear. Several new members were added to the roster of returnees: Walter Wild, David Tyler, Bent Boving, Arpad Csapo, and David Bishop. Of particular advantage was the addition to the group of George W. Bartelmez, recently retired from the University of Chicago’s Department of Anatomy. He brought his wide knowledge and experience as a vertebrate embryologist and, specifically, continued his study of the anatomy and physiology of the arteries of the primate uterus. He and Hartman cooperated with Corner in the latter’s definitive publication on the life history of the corpus luteum in monkeys.


In addition there were numerous visiting fellows of multitudinous origin, all of whom carried back home a high opinion of the caliber of work done at the Carnegie Laboratory and of the men doing it. The famous “Carnegie Lunch Table” with its friendly erudite conversation became something of an international bond.


Corner himself had time for only a limited amount of scientific work. He had completed the corpus luteum study, as noted above, published studies of normal and incomplete twinning, and most particularly, in the years after 1949, worked with Arpad Csapo upon uterine muscle and the hormonal control of its action.


As author and editor he was enormously busy throughout the Carnegie years. The statistics of his scientific and historical writings, publications of lectures, book reviews, obituary articles, and annual reports of the Embryological Laboratory are startling: ninety-seven principal articles in fifteen years!


In 1949 he gave the Vanuxem Lectures at Princeton, which discussed the hormones of the reproductive system in terms comprehensible to a lay audience. The lectures were published as The Hormones in Human Reproduction. This book appeared in translation in Spanish, Portugese, French, Italian, and Swedish and was perhaps the most widely popular of his books. It is still available in paperback form.


The Terry Lectures given at Yale were published in 1941 as Ourselves Unborn. The final words of the book interestingly embody the concept which Corner initially encountered in Watson’s course in psychology in his senior year in college: “We bear through all our days the marks of intimate kinship with the animal world, tempered by powers of the mind that bestow dignity and honor upon the life of the body.” This book, widely and favorably reviewed, was published in Spanish translation in 1950. In that same year, the Corners translated Inés L. C. de Allende’s book, Cytology of the Human Vagina, from Spanish into English for publication by Hoeber, New York. Both Dr. and Mrs. Corner studied Spanish to enable them to make the translation, and of course this familiarity with Spanish greatly enhanced the value and pleasure of Corner’s numerous appearances as guest lecturer at South American universities and societies.

The Addison Lecture at Guy’s Hospital in 1950 and the Huxley Lecture at Charing Cross Hospital in 1959 took him again to London.


Sigma Xi selected Corner as visiting lecturer for 1950. He gave the same lecture on the menstrual cycle of the Rhesus monkey twenty-one times as he visited colleges and universities in the southeastern states. The repetitions he found far from monotonous as he was interested to see how each new place and new audience stimulated a fresh approach.


Over the years Corner was tapped to present commencement speeches at colleges and universities. Two deeply philosophical talks were so warmly received as to call for publication. Anatomists in Search of the Soul was published in 1919, and A Glimpse of Imcomprehensibles, given at Swarthmore College in 1954, was published in that year. Both of them are reproduced in Anatomists at Large as well as the very early paper on Mithridatium and Theriac, which was presented before the Johns Hopkins Medical History Club in January 1915. Anatomist at Large itself was published in 1958 and includes a brief autobiography up to that date, as well as the two lectures cited and several other small essays.


One book in particular required especially long and intense work, the Autobiography of Benjamin Rush (1745-1813), based on a manuscript of Rush’s autobiography and commonplace book. Corner both edited it and supplied extensive annotations ammounting to a history of Philadelphia and indeed of the young nation at that time.


A by-product of the Rush book was the suggestion that he similarly edit and interpret a newly discovered diary of William Shippen (1736-1808), first professor of anatomy and midwifery at the University of Pennsylvania. Corner himself was too busy at the time to do so, but Mrs. Corner undertook the project. She had been increasingly interested in medical history and had already used her librarian’s training and her agile pen to produce some short articles on John Fothergill, a medical contemporary of Rush and Shippin. William Shippen, Jr, Pioneer in Medical Education was published in 1951. This was the start of Betsy Copping Corner’s fine work in medical history. Unfortunately, her long illness prevented her from completing her second book based on Fothergill’s correspondence. Dr. Corner did it for her, and Chain of Friendship: Selected Letters of Dr. John Fothergill appeared in 197].


But what Dr. Corner designated “the minor statesmanship of science” was ever more demanding. In 1940 he was elected to both the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences. He was vice president of the latter from 1953 to 1957. He noted that in his final year at the Carnegie Laboratory he was member or officer of nineteen committees, fifteen of them holding one-to-six meetings a year outside of Baltimore. With him, membership was never pro forma, he worked hard and contributed so substantially that he was constantly in demand by yet more societies.


In 1952-53 he was honored by appointment to the George Eastman’s Visiting Professorship at Oxford. This entailed a rich and deeply enjoyed year’s stay in Oxford, where three years previously he had received an honorary degree from the university. During the year of the professorship he was made a fellow of Balliol College with its numerous rights and privileges and interesting duties. He renewed old friendships and made new ones, and participated in the college life and in the fascinating activities and traditions of Oxford, town and university. He worked for some time in the anatomical laboratory, where he investigated the nerves innervating the uterine muscle, resulting in a paper in the Anatomical Record.

In the two years of his directorship of the Carnegie Laboratory that remained after his return from Oxford, Corner’s lecture schedule became more and more crowded and new committees took a great deal of time.


Of one committee, that established by Vannevar Bush within the Office of Scientific Research and Development which Bush had headed during the war, Corner was made chairman. The committee studied the development of aids to the blind. Specific results were meager, but the whole field was canvassed by a group of experts and ways for future research were set forth. A second committee was that of the Yerkes Laboratory of Primate Biology where Corner was a member of the Board of Scientific Directors for many years. His work on the Committee for Research in Problems of Sex (he succeeded Yerkes as chairman in 1947) brought him into contact with Alfred Kinsey, and an interesting involvement in some of the controversies about the Kinsey report. Next, a particularly heavy load of work was associated with one of the committees of the Guggenheim Foundation, that responsible for selection of fellows for the United States and Canada. Work on the International Nomenclature Committee took the Corners to England almost every summer, and additional occasions for this pleasant activity (both Corners being fond of travel) came when he was installed as a member of the Royal Society of London in 1955.


With the approach of his retirement from Carnegie, Corner again face the problem of “What next?” But as so often before, an attractive offer was made before the problem became acute. Detlev Bronk, president of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in New York City, asked him to undertake the writing of the history of the institute. Its trustees wished to publish such a record in recognition of the fiftieth anniversary of the institute’s founding, soon to be celebrated. The intrinsic interest of the assignment promptly decided Corner to accept, particularly as additional incentives were offered: space and assistants for his personal research and that of an associate he might wish to bring with him. Arpad Csapo readily accepted his role in this scheme and the future of the ongoing investigation of uterine muscle was assured."

Selected Publications

1921 Paper - Cyclic Changes in the Ovaries and Uterus of Swine

Corner GW. Cyclic changes in the ovaries and uterus of swine, and their relations to the mechanism of implantation. (1921) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 394, :117-146.

1929 A well-preserved Human Embryo of 10 Somites

Corner GW. A well-preserved human embryo of 10 somites. (1929) Carnegie Instn. Wash. Publ. 394, Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. 20: 81-102.

References

Corner GW. Maturation of the ovum in swine . (1917) Anat. Rec. 13(2): 109-112.

Corner GW. and Amsbaugh AE. Oestrus and ovulation in swine. (1917) Anat. Rec. 12: 287-.

Corner GW. On the origin of the corpus luteum of the sow from both granulosa and theca interna. (1919) Amer. J Anat. 26(1): 117-183.

Corner GW. Cyclic changes in the ovaries and uterus of swine, and their relations to the mechanism of implantation. (1921) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 394, :117-146.

Corner GW. Internal migration of the ovum. (1921) Johns Hopk. Hosp. Bull. 32: 78.

Corner GW. Abnormalities of the mammalian embryo occurring before implantation. (1922) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 60, : 61-66.

Corner GW. The morphological theory of monochorionic twins as illustrated by a series of supposed early twin embryos of the pig. (1922) Johns Hopkins Hospital Bulletin 33: .

Corner GW. Ovulation and menstruation in Macacus rhesus. (1923) Contributions to Embryology, vol. 15, Carnegie Inst. Washington Pub. no. 332, 75-101.

Corner GW. A well-preserved human embryo of 10 somites. (1929) Carnegie Instn. Wash. Publ. 394, Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. 20: 81-102.

Corner GW. The hormone of the corpus luteum. (1937) Trans Edinb Obstet Soc. 57: 61-80. PMID 29612342

Corner GW. The events of the primate ovarian cycle. (1952) Br Med J. 2(4781): 403-409.PMID 14944840

Corner GW. The observed embryology of human single-ovum twins and other multiple births. (1955) Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol., 70(5); 933-51 PMID 13258680

Ramsey EM. Corner GW. Jr. Donner MW. and Stran HM. Radioangiographic studies of circulation in the maternal placenta of the rhesus monkey: preliminary report. (1960) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 46(7): 1003-8 PMID 16590693

PubMed Bibliography

Search Pubmed: GW (Author)

CORNER GW. (1955). The observed embryology of human single-ovum twins and other multiple births. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 70, 933-51. PMID: 13258680

CORNER GW & NESBITT RE. (1954). Pregnancy and pulmonary resection. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 68, 903-15. PMID: 13188923

NESBITT RE & CORNER GW. (1956). Torsion of the human pregnant uterus. Obstet Gynecol Surv , 11, 311-32. PMID: 13335050

CORNER GW & STRAN HM. (1957). A fetal heart ratemeter. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 73, 190-5. PMID: 13381811

CORNER GW & STRAN HM. (1957). A recording sphygmomanometer. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 73, 196-9. PMID: 13381812

CORNER GW, KISTNER RW & WALL RL. (1951). The relationship of prolonged labor to fetal mortality. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 62, 1086-92. PMID: 14885290

RAMSEY EM, CORNER GW, LONG WN & STRAN HM. (1959). Studies of amniotic fluid and intervillous space pressures in the rhesus monkey. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 77, 1016-27. PMID: 13649772

CORNER GW, RAMSEY EM & STRAN H. (1963). Patterns of myometrial activity in the rhesus monkey in pregnancy. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 85, 179-85. PMID: 14023069

RAMSEY EM, CORNER GW & DONNER MW. (1963). Serial and cineradioangiographic visualization of maternal circulation in the primate (hemochorial) placenta. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 86, 213-25. PMID: 13990708

RAMSEY EM, CORNER GW & DONNER MW. (1963). CINERADIOANGIOGRAPHIC VISUALIZATION OF THE VENOUS DRAINAGE OF THE PRIMATE PLACENTA IN VIVO. Science , 141, 909-10. PMID: 14043333

CORNER GW. (1963). Exploring the placental maze. The development of our knowledge of the relation between the bloodstreams of mother and infant in utero. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 86, 408-18. PMID: 14040479

CORNER GW. (1963). The fetal and maternal circulation of the placenta. Clin Obstet Gynecol , 6, 17-25. PMID: 14023070

DONNER MW, RAMSEY EM & CORNER GW. (1963). MATERNAL CIRCULATION IN THE PLACENTA OF THE RHESUS MONKEY; A RADIOANGIOGRAPHIC STUDY. Am J Roentgenol Radium Ther Nucl Med , 90, 638-49. PMID: 14076056

CORNER GW, FARRIS EJ & CORNER GW. (1950). The dating of ovulation and other ovarian crises by histological examination in comparison with the Farris test. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 59, 514-28. PMID: 15410346

CORNER GW, FARRIS EJ & CORNER GW. (1950). The dating of ovulation and other ovarian crises by histological examination in comparison with the Farris test. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 59, 514-28. PMID: 15410346

BOWYER TS & CORNER GW. (1947). Premature quadruplets. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 54, 1033-7. PMID: 20272310

CORNER GW. (1959). Endocrine factors in the etiology of spontaneous abortion. Clin Obstet Gynecol , 2, 36-44. PMID: 13639313

Corner GW & Allen WM. (2005). Physiology of the corpus luteum. 1929. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 193, 1574; discussion 1575. PMID: 16202759 DOI.

Corner GW & Harris BA. (1979). Sterilization by mini-laparotomy. Female Patient , 4, 51-3. PMID: 12261211

Corner GW. (1974). Herbert McLean Evans. Biogr Mem Natl Acad Sci , 45, 153-92. PMID: 11615647

Amoroso EC & Corner GW. (1972). Herbert McLean Evans, 1882-1971. Biogr Mem Fellows R Soc , 18, 83-186. PMID: 11615755

CORNER GW. (1965). THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE OESTROGENIC HORMONES. J. Endocrinol. , 31, III-XVII. PMID: 14241740

CORNER GW. (1963). GEORGE HOYT WHIPPLE, NOBEL PRIZE PATHOLOGIST. Trans Stud Coll Physicians Phila , 31, 40-1. PMID: 14044626

CORNER GW. (1962). [The hospital of the Rockefeller Institute]. Scalpel (Brux) , 115, 18-21. PMID: 13881387

CORNER GW. (1960). The past of anatomy in the United States. Anat. Rec. , 137, 179-82. PMID: 13812017

CORNER GW. (1958). The role of anatomy in medical education. J Med Educ , 33, 1-9. PMID: 13491981

Hoffmann D, Adams JD, Lisk D, Fisenne I & Brunnemann KD. (1987). Toxic and carcinogenic agents in dry and moist snuff. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. , 79, 1281-6. PMID: 3480379

CORNER GW. (1956). The histological dating of the human corpus luteum of menstruation. Am. J. Anat. , 98, 377-401. PMID: 13362120 DOI.

CORNER GW. (1954). Anatomical terminology. Science , 120, 124-5. PMID: 13178670

PALLIE W, CORNER GW & WEDDELL G. (1954). Nerve terminations in the myometrium of the rabbit. Anat. Rec. , 118, 789-811. PMID: 13158877

CORNER GW & GOODWIN WE. (1953). Benjamin Franklin's bladder stone. J Hist Med Allied Sci , 8, 359-77. PMID: 13109181

CORNER GW & CSAPO A. (1953). Action of the ovarian hormones on uterine muscle. Br Med J , 1, 687-93. PMID: 13032456

CSAPO AI & CORNER GW. (1953). The effect of estrogen on the isometric tension of rabbit uterine strips. Science , 117, 162-4. PMID: 13038473

CORNER GW. (1953). The discovery of smooth muscle in the uterus. Acta Physiol Lat Am , 3, 67-70. PMID: 13138239

CSAPO AI & CORNER GW. (1952). The antagonistic effects of estrogen and progesterone on the staircase phenomenon in uterine muscle. Endocrinology , 51, 378-85. PMID: 13010191 DOI.

CORNER GW. (1952). The events of the primate ovarian cycle. Br Med J , 2, 403-9. PMID: 14944840

CSAPO A & CORNER GW. (1951). Shortening of uterine muscle at different temperatures. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. , 78, 266-9. PMID: 14891987

CSAPO A & CORNER GW. (1951). In vitro contraception of pseudopregnant uterine muscle contrasted with estrous motility. Endocrinology , 49, 349-68. PMID: 14887648 DOI.

CORNER GW. (1951). Our knowledge of the menstrual cycle, 1910-1950. Lancet , 1, 919-23. PMID: 14825858

CORNER GW. (1950). The relation of the ovary to the menstrual cycle; notes on the history of a belated discovery. An Fac Med Univ Repub Montev Urug , 35, 758-66. PMID: 14771519

CHAPMAN EM & CORNER GW. (1948). The collection of radioactive iodine by the human fetal thyroid. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. , 8, 717-20. PMID: 18880940 DOI.

CORNER GW. (1947). Medical treasures in the library of the American Philosophical Society. Science , 106, 120. PMID: 20344397

HARTMAN CG & CORNER GW. (1947). Removal of the corpus luteum and of the ovaries of the rhesus monkey during pregnancy; observations and cautions. Anat. Rec. , 98, 539-46. PMID: 20255047

BARTELMEZ GW, CORNER GW & HARTMAN CG. (1946). Phases of the menstrual cycle in the macaque monkey. Anat. Rec. , 94, 512. PMID: 21020638

Corner GW. (1944). ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE IN THE OVARIAN FOLLICLES AND CORPORA LUTEA. Science , 100, 270-1. PMID: 17746133 DOI.

Corner GW. (1943). SPELLING OF THE ADJECTIVE "HYPOPHYSEAL". Science , 97, 67-8. PMID: 17799311 DOI.

Boyden EA, Clark SL, Danforth CH, Greulich WW & Corner GW. (1942). COMMITTEE ON ANATOMICAL NOMENCLATURE. Science , 96, 116. PMID: 17809984 DOI.

Lewis FT & Corner GW. (1938). THE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ANATOMISTS 1888-1938. Science , 87, 531-4. PMID: 17746961 DOI.

Corner GW. (1937). ANATOMICAL NOMENCLATURE. Science , 85, 428. PMID: 17814219 DOI.

Corner GW. (1937). ETYMOLOGY AND PRONUNCIATION OF THE WORD "OESTRUS" AND ITS DERIVATIVES. Science , 85, 197-8. PMID: 17844622 DOI.

Allen WM, Butenandt A, Corner GW & Slotta KH. (1935). NOMENCLATURE OF CORPUS LUTEUM HORMONE. Science , 82, 153. PMID: 17811944 DOI.

Corner GW. (1921). THE OVARIAN CYCLE OF SWINE. Science , 53, 420-1. PMID: 17773390 DOI.


George Corner Reference List 
Embryology References

Corner GW. Maturation of the ovum in swine . (1917) Anat. Rec. 13(2): 109-112.

Corner GW. Cyclic changes in the ovaries and uterus of swine, and their relations to the mechanism of implantation. (1921) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 394, :117-146.

Corner GW. Ovulation and menstruation in Macacus rhesus. (1923) Contributions to Embryology, vol. 15, Carnegie Inst. Washington Pub. no. 332, 75-101.

Corner GW. A well-preserved human embryo of 10 somites. (1929) Carnegie Instn. Wash. Publ. 394, Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. 20: 81-102.

Corner GW. The hormone of the corpus luteum. (1937) Trans Edinb Obstet Soc. 57: 61-80. PMID 29612342

Corner GW. Etymology and pronunciation of the word "oestrus" and its derivatives. (1937) Science. 85(2199):197-198. PMID 17844622

Corner GW. The events of the primate ovarian cycle. (1952) Br Med J. 2(4781): 403-409.PMID 14944840

Corner GW. The observed embryology of human single-ovum twins and other multiple births. (1955) Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol., 70(5); 933-51 PMID 13258680

Ramsey EM. Corner GW. Jr. Donner MW. and Stran HM. Radioangiographic studies of circulation in the maternal placenta of the rhesus monkey: preliminary report. (1960) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 46(7): 1003-8 PMID 16590693

PubMed References

CORNER GW. (1955). The observed embryology of human single-ovum twins and other multiple births. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 70, 933-51. PMID: 13258680

CORNER GW & NESBITT RE. (1954). Pregnancy and pulmonary resection. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 68, 903-15. PMID: 13188923

NESBITT RE & CORNER GW. (1956). Torsion of the human pregnant uterus. Obstet Gynecol Surv , 11, 311-32. PMID: 13335050

CORNER GW & STRAN HM. (1957). A fetal heart ratemeter. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 73, 190-5. PMID: 13381811

CORNER GW & STRAN HM. (1957). A recording sphygmomanometer. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 73, 196-9. PMID: 13381812

CORNER GW, KISTNER RW & WALL RL. (1951). The relationship of prolonged labor to fetal mortality. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 62, 1086-92. PMID: 14885290

RAMSEY EM, CORNER GW, LONG WN & STRAN HM. (1959). Studies of amniotic fluid and intervillous space pressures in the rhesus monkey. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 77, 1016-27. PMID: 13649772

CORNER GW, RAMSEY EM & STRAN H. (1963). Patterns of myometrial activity in the rhesus monkey in pregnancy. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 85, 179-85. PMID: 14023069

RAMSEY EM, CORNER GW & DONNER MW. (1963). Serial and cineradioangiographic visualization of maternal circulation in the primate (hemochorial) placenta. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 86, 213-25. PMID: 13990708

RAMSEY EM, CORNER GW & DONNER MW. (1963). CINERADIOANGIOGRAPHIC VISUALIZATION OF THE VENOUS DRAINAGE OF THE PRIMATE PLACENTA IN VIVO. Science , 141, 909-10. PMID: 14043333

CORNER GW. (1963). Exploring the placental maze. The development of our knowledge of the relation between the bloodstreams of mother and infant in utero. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 86, 408-18. PMID: 14040479

CORNER GW. (1963). The fetal and maternal circulation of the placenta. Clin Obstet Gynecol , 6, 17-25. PMID: 14023070

DONNER MW, RAMSEY EM & CORNER GW. (1963). MATERNAL CIRCULATION IN THE PLACENTA OF THE RHESUS MONKEY; A RADIOANGIOGRAPHIC STUDY. Am J Roentgenol Radium Ther Nucl Med , 90, 638-49. PMID: 14076056

CORNER GW, FARRIS EJ & CORNER GW. (1950). The dating of ovulation and other ovarian crises by histological examination in comparison with the Farris test. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 59, 514-28. PMID: 15410346

CORNER GW, FARRIS EJ & CORNER GW. (1950). The dating of ovulation and other ovarian crises by histological examination in comparison with the Farris test. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 59, 514-28. PMID: 15410346

BOWYER TS & CORNER GW. (1947). Premature quadruplets. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 54, 1033-7. PMID: 20272310

CORNER GW. (1959). Endocrine factors in the etiology of spontaneous abortion. Clin Obstet Gynecol , 2, 36-44. PMID: 13639313

Corner GW & Allen WM. (2005). Physiology of the corpus luteum. 1929. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. , 193, 1574; discussion 1575. PMID: 16202759 DOI.

Corner GW & Harris BA. (1979). Sterilization by mini-laparotomy. Female Patient , 4, 51-3. PMID: 12261211

Corner GW. (1974). Herbert McLean Evans. Biogr Mem Natl Acad Sci , 45, 153-92. PMID: 11615647

Amoroso EC & Corner GW. (1972). Herbert McLean Evans, 1882-1971. Biogr Mem Fellows R Soc , 18, 83-186. PMID: 11615755

CORNER GW. (1965). THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE OESTROGENIC HORMONES. J. Endocrinol. , 31, III-XVII. PMID: 14241740

CORNER GW. (1963). GEORGE HOYT WHIPPLE, NOBEL PRIZE PATHOLOGIST. Trans Stud Coll Physicians Phila , 31, 40-1. PMID: 14044626

CORNER GW. (1962). [The hospital of the Rockefeller Institute]. Scalpel (Brux) , 115, 18-21. PMID: 13881387

CORNER GW. (1960). The past of anatomy in the United States. Anat. Rec. , 137, 179-82. PMID: 13812017

CORNER GW. (1958). The role of anatomy in medical education. J Med Educ , 33, 1-9. PMID: 13491981

Hoffmann D, Adams JD, Lisk D, Fisenne I & Brunnemann KD. (1987). Toxic and carcinogenic agents in dry and moist snuff. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. , 79, 1281-6. PMID: 3480379

CORNER GW. (1956). The histological dating of the human corpus luteum of menstruation. Am. J. Anat. , 98, 377-401. PMID: 13362120 DOI.

CORNER GW. (1954). Anatomical terminology. Science , 120, 124-5. PMID: 13178670

PALLIE W, CORNER GW & WEDDELL G. (1954). Nerve terminations in the myometrium of the rabbit. Anat. Rec. , 118, 789-811. PMID: 13158877

CORNER GW & GOODWIN WE. (1953). Benjamin Franklin's bladder stone. J Hist Med Allied Sci , 8, 359-77. PMID: 13109181

CORNER GW & CSAPO A. (1953). Action of the ovarian hormones on uterine muscle. Br Med J , 1, 687-93. PMID: 13032456

CSAPO AI & CORNER GW. (1953). The effect of estrogen on the isometric tension of rabbit uterine strips. Science , 117, 162-4. PMID: 13038473

CORNER GW. (1953). The discovery of smooth muscle in the uterus. Acta Physiol Lat Am , 3, 67-70. PMID: 13138239

CSAPO AI & CORNER GW. (1952). The antagonistic effects of estrogen and progesterone on the staircase phenomenon in uterine muscle. Endocrinology , 51, 378-85. PMID: 13010191 DOI.

CORNER GW. (1952). The events of the primate ovarian cycle. Br Med J , 2, 403-9. PMID: 14944840

CSAPO A & CORNER GW. (1951). Shortening of uterine muscle at different temperatures. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. , 78, 266-9. PMID: 14891987

CSAPO A & CORNER GW. (1951). In vitro contraception of pseudopregnant uterine muscle contrasted with estrous motility. Endocrinology , 49, 349-68. PMID: 14887648 DOI.

CORNER GW. (1951). Our knowledge of the menstrual cycle, 1910-1950. Lancet , 1, 919-23. PMID: 14825858

CORNER GW. (1950). The relation of the ovary to the menstrual cycle; notes on the history of a belated discovery. An Fac Med Univ Repub Montev Urug , 35, 758-66. PMID: 14771519

CHAPMAN EM & CORNER GW. (1948). The collection of radioactive iodine by the human fetal thyroid. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. , 8, 717-20. PMID: 18880940 DOI.

CORNER GW. (1947). Medical treasures in the library of the American Philosophical Society. Science , 106, 120. PMID: 20344397

HARTMAN CG & CORNER GW. (1947). Removal of the corpus luteum and of the ovaries of the rhesus monkey during pregnancy; observations and cautions. Anat. Rec. , 98, 539-46. PMID: 20255047

BARTELMEZ GW, CORNER GW & HARTMAN CG. (1946). Phases of the menstrual cycle in the macaque monkey. Anat. Rec. , 94, 512. PMID: 21020638

Corner GW. (1944). ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE IN THE OVARIAN FOLLICLES AND CORPORA LUTEA. Science , 100, 270-1. PMID: 17746133 DOI.

Corner GW. (1943). SPELLING OF THE ADJECTIVE "HYPOPHYSEAL". Science , 97, 67-8. PMID: 17799311 DOI.

Boyden EA, Clark SL, Danforth CH, Greulich WW & Corner GW. (1942). COMMITTEE ON ANATOMICAL NOMENCLATURE. Science , 96, 116. PMID: 17809984 DOI.

Lewis FT & Corner GW. (1938). THE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ANATOMISTS 1888-1938. Science , 87, 531-4. PMID: 17746961 DOI.

Corner GW. (1937). ANATOMICAL NOMENCLATURE. Science , 85, 428. PMID: 17814219 DOI.

Corner GW. (1937). ETYMOLOGY AND PRONUNCIATION OF THE WORD "OESTRUS" AND ITS DERIVATIVES. Science , 85, 197-8. PMID: 17844622 DOI.

Allen WM, Butenandt A, Corner GW & Slotta KH. (1935). NOMENCLATURE OF CORPUS LUTEUM HORMONE. Science , 82, 153. PMID: 17811944 DOI.

Corner GW. (1921). THE OVARIAN CYCLE OF SWINE. Science , 53, 420-1. PMID: 17773390 DOI.

Search Pubmed: GW (Author)
  1. Corner GW. Warren Harmon Lewis 1870-1964 A Biographical Memoir. (1964) National Academy Of Sciences 324-345. PDF
  2. Ramsey EM. Corner GW. Jr. Donner MW. and Stran HM. Radioangiographic studies of circulation in the maternal placenta of the rhesus monkey: preliminary report. (1960) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 46(7): 1003-8 PMID 16590693

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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2020, July 16) Embryology Embryology History - George Corner. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Embryology_History_-_George_Corner

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