Hamster Development

From Embryology
Embryology - 23 Mar 2017    Facebook link Pinterest link Twitter link  Expand to Translate  
Google Translate - select your language from the list shown below (this will open a new external page)

العربية | català | 中文 | 中國傳統的 | français | Deutsche | עִברִית | हिंदी | bahasa Indonesia | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | မြန်မာ | Pilipino | Polskie | português | ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਦੇ | Română | русский | Español | Swahili | Svensk | ไทย | Türkçe | اردو | ייִדיש | Tiếng Việt    These external translations are automated and may not be accurate. (More? About Translations)

Introduction

Adult hamster

These rodents belonging to the subfamily Cricetinae. Sexual maturity occurs at about 4 to 6 weeks and hamsters are seasonal breeders (April to October in the northern hemisphere) with several litters of 1 to 13 pups after a gestation period of between 16 to 23 days. The Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus) ovary (CHO) cells have been used widely in research as a host for protein production.

This animal model also demonstrates neural tube defects when exposed prenatally to hyperthermia.

Links: Hyperthermia | Neural | Category:Hamster

Animal Development: Axolotl | Bat | Cat | Chicken | Cow | Dog | Dolphin | Echidna | Fly | Frog | Grasshopper | Guinea Pig | Hamster | Kangaroo | Koala | Lizard | Medaka | Mouse | Pig | Platypus | Rabbit | Rat | Sea Squirt | Sea Urchin | Sheep | Worm | Zebrafish | Life Cycles | Development Timetable | K12
Historic Embryology  
1897 Pig | 1900 Chicken | 1901 Lungfish | 1904 Sand Lizard | 1905 Rabbit | 1906 Deer | 1907 Tarsiers | 1908 Human | 1909 Northern Lapwing | 1909 South American and African Lungfish | 1910 Salamander | 1951 Frog | Embryology History | Historic Disclaimer

Some Recent Findings

  • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) acts as a tumor promoter on Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells[1] "Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (C(8)F(17)SO(3)) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) (C(8)HF(15)O(2)) are synthetic chemicals widely used in industrial applications for their hydrophobic and oleophobic properties. They are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic to mammalian species. Their widespread distribution on earth and contamination of human serum raised concerns about long-term side effects. They are suspected to be carcinogenic through a nongenotoxic mode of action, a mechanism supported by recent findings that PFOS induced cell transformation but no genotoxicity in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. ...The whole results showed that PFOA acts as a tumor promoter and a nongenotoxic carcinogen. Cell transformation in initiated cells was observed at concentrations equivalent to the ones found in human serum of nonoccupationally and occupationally exposed populations. An involvement of PFOA in increased incidence of cancer recorded in occupationally exposed population cannot be ruled out."
  • Hyperthermia induces upregulation of Connexin43 in the golden hamster neural tube[2] "During early embryonic development, maternal exposure to hyperthermia induces neural tube defects (NTDs). Connexins are essential for the formation of gap junctions and Connexin43 (Cx43) is crucially involved in neural tube development. ...Our data provide the first evidence that hyperthermia induces upregulation of Cx43 in the golden hamster neural tube. NTDs caused by hyperthermia may be intimately related with the overexpression of Cx43."
  • Biosynthesis of hamster zona pellucida is restricted to the oocyte[3] "We recently described the expression of four ZP proteins in the hamster ovary. By means of the complete set of the hamster ZP cDNAs, we undertook the study of the origin and expression pattern of the four ZP genes. In the present work, the expression of ZP1, ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4 is carefully analyzed by in situ hybridization (ISH) in hamster ovaries. Our data suggest that the four hamster ZP genes are expressed in a coordinate and oocyte-specific manner during folliculogenesis. Furthermore, this expression is maximal during the first stages of the oocyte development and declines in oocytes from later development stages, particularly within large antral follicles."
More recent papers
Mark Hill.jpg
PubMed logo.gif

This table shows an automated computer PubMed search using the listed sub-heading term.

  • Therefore the list of references do not reflect any editorial selection of material based on content or relevance.
  • References appear in this list based upon the date of the actual page viewing.

References listed on the rest of the content page and the associated discussion page (listed under the publication year sub-headings) do include some editorial selection based upon both relevance and availability.

Links: References | Discussion Page | Pubmed Most Recent | Journal Searches


Search term: Hamster Embryology

Christoph Bode, Franziska Richter, Christine Spröte, Tanja Brigadski, Anne Bauer, Simone Fietz, Jean-Marc Fritschy, Angelika Richter Altered postnatal maturation of striatal GABAergic interneurons in a phenotypic animal model of dystonia. Exp. Neurol.: 2016; PubMed 27780732

Quan Zhang, Chenyang Ji, Lu Yan, Meiya Lu, Chensheng Lu, Meirong Zhao The identification of the metabolites of chlorothalonil in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and their embryo toxicity and endocrine effects at environmentally relevant levels. Environ. Pollut.: 2016, 218;8-15 PubMed 27541960

Katharina Fleck, Georg Erhardt, Gesine Lühken From single nucleotide substitutions up to chromosomal deletions: genetic pause of leucism-associated disorders in animals. Berl. Munch. Tierarztl. Wochenschr.: 2016, 129(7-8);269-81 PubMed 27529988

Azadeh Sadat Azadbakhsh, Mohammad Reza Sam, Farrah Farokhi Bioengineering of differentiated hepatocytes with human factor IX-expressing plasmids in vitro. Bioengineered: 2016, 7(6);497-503 PubMed 27458870

Seda Rençber, Sinem Yaprak Karavana, Fethiye Ferda Yılmaz, Bayri Eraç, Merve Nenni, Seda Özbal, Çetin Pekçetin, Hande Gurer-Orhan, Mine Hoşgör-Limoncu, Pelin Güneri, Gökhan Ertan Development, characterization, and in vivo assessment of mucoadhesive nanoparticles containing fluconazole for the local treatment of oral candidiasis. Int J Nanomedicine: 2016, 11;2641-53 PubMed 27358561

Taxon

Lineage: Eukaryota; Metazoa; Chordata; Craniata; Vertebrata; Euteleostomi; Mammalia; Eutheria; Euarchontoglires; Glires; Rodentia; Sciurognathi; Muroidea; Cricetidae; Cricetinae;

  • Chinese Hamster
  • Dwarf Hamster
  • Dwarf Campbells Russian Hamster
  • European Hamster
  • Golden Hamster
  • Mouse-Like Hamster
  • Pearl Winter White Dwarf Russian Hamster
  • Roborovski Hamster
  • Standard Hamster
  • Syrian Hamster


Hamster Development

  • Estrus (for mating) is usually about 12 hours.
  • Gestation period varies by type ranging between 18 to 22 days.
    • Syrian Hamster 16 days, Dwarf Winter White Russian Hamster, Campbell’s and Chinese Hamster 18 to 21 days, Roborovski Hamster 23 to 30 days.
  • litter size is usually between 4 to 6.

References

  1. N Jacquet, M A Maire, C Rast, M Bonnard, P Vasseur Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) acts as a tumor promoter on Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int: 2011, 19(7);2537-49 PubMed 22828883
  2. Jing Zhang, Feng-Zhe Chen, Qing Gao, Jin-Hao Sun, Guang-Ping Tian, Ying-Mao Gao Hyperthermia induces upregulation of connexin43 in the golden hamster neural tube. Birth Defects Res. Part A Clin. Mol. Teratol.: 2012, 94(1);16-21 PubMed 21954174
  3. M J Izquierdo-Rico, L Gimeno, C Jiménez-Cervantes, J Ballesta, M Avilés Biosynthesis of hamster zona pellucida is restricted to the oocyte. Theriogenology: 2011, 75(3);463-72 PubMed 21074836

Reviews

Jeff Reese, Hehai Wang, Tianbing Ding, B C Paria The hamster as a model for embryo implantation: insights into a multifaceted process. Semin. Cell Dev. Biol.: 2008, 19(2);194-203 PubMed 18178492


Articles

Tianbing Ding, Haengseok Song, Xiaohong Wang, Atanu Khatua, Bibhash C Paria Leukemia inhibitory factor ligand-receptor signaling is important for uterine receptivity and implantation in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Reproduction: 2008, 135(1);41-53 PubMed 18159082

G V Sireesha, R W Mason, M Hassanein, S Tonack, A Navarrete Santos, B Fischer, P B Seshagiri Role of cathepsins in blastocyst hatching in the golden hamster. Mol. Hum. Reprod.: 2008, 14(6);337-46 PubMed 18463158

B Wlodarczyk, B Biernacki, M Minta, J Zmudzki Postimplantation whole embryo culture assay for hamsters: an alternative to rat and mouse. ScientificWorldJournal: 2001, 1;227-34 PubMed 12806092

A Mishra, P B Seshagiri Evidence for the involvement of a species-specific embryonic protease in zona escape of hamster blastocysts. Mol. Hum. Reprod.: 2000, 6(11);1005-12 PubMed 11044463

M T Ebron-McCoy, P E Beyer, L A Oglesby, R J Kavlock In vitro culture of postimplantation hamster embryos. Reprod. Toxicol.: 1988, 2(1);31-6 PubMed 2980399


Search Pubmed

Search Pubmed: hamster embryo development | hamster development

External Links

External Links Notice - The dynamic nature of the internet may mean that some of these listed links may no longer function. If the link no longer works search the web with the link text or name. Links to any external commercial sites are provided for information purposes only and should never be considered an endorsement. UNSW Embryology is provided as an educational resource with no clinical information or commercial affiliation.


Animal Development: Axolotl | Bat | Cat | Chicken | Cow | Dog | Dolphin | Echidna | Fly | Frog | Grasshopper | Guinea Pig | Hamster | Kangaroo | Koala | Lizard | Medaka | Mouse | Pig | Platypus | Rabbit | Rat | Sea Squirt | Sea Urchin | Sheep | Worm | Zebrafish | Life Cycles | Development Timetable | K12
Historic Embryology  
1897 Pig | 1900 Chicken | 1901 Lungfish | 1904 Sand Lizard | 1905 Rabbit | 1906 Deer | 1907 Tarsiers | 1908 Human | 1909 Northern Lapwing | 1909 South American and African Lungfish | 1910 Salamander | 1951 Frog | Embryology History | Historic Disclaimer

Glossary Links

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Numbers | Symbols

Cite this page: Hill, M.A. 2017 Embryology Hamster Development. Retrieved March 23, 2017, from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Hamster_Development

What Links Here?
© Dr Mark Hill 2017, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G