Difference between revisions of "ANAT2341 Lab 12"

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{{ANAT2341Lab12}}
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=QUIZ=
  
==Individual Assessment Lab 12 - Stem Cells==
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=Stem Cell Paper Presentation=
  
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As part of the assessment for this course, your group will give a 15 minutes journal club presentation (including 3 minutes question time) in the final lab 12 on 23 October.
  
As part of the assessment for this course, you will give a 10 minutes journal club presentation in lab 12 (28 October 11-1). For this you will have to prepare a powerpoint show as a group to discuss a recent (published after 2010) original research article (not a review!) on stem cell biology or technology. There are lots of interesting articles out there. Please find them on PubMed. Articles published in Nature, Science, Cell or PNAS are usually spectacular pieces of research!
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This assignment will allow you to apply the knowledge that your acquired in the stem cell lecture, and it will teach you to search journal databases, to become familiar with the research field of stem cell biology, and to improve your presentation skills.
  
Each group sends PDFs of 2-3 selected articles to me (Annemiek) by 5 pm on Monday 20 October. I will select which of the chosen articles you will present, and inform you asap, and by Friday 24 October latest.  
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You will discuss a recent (published after 2013) original research article (not a review!) on stem cell biology or technology.
  
Please note that we will have 8 groups presenting. This means your presentations have to be very concise, and that we will have to stop you if you go over time. As a guideline, each one slide takes about 1 minute to talk through. So do not use more than 10-12 slides total. It works best if one student presents introduction, a second student the results, and a third the discussion. Please read through attached document for tips for presentations.
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Please send the PDFs of 2-3 articles to Annemiek (A.Beverdam@unsw.edu.au) by 5 pm on Tuesday 16 October. She will judge suitability and select the best article for the journal club.
  
You will receive a group mark based on presentation content, insight and comprehension, and presentation and slide style. We will penalise for going over time.
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Please note that the best articles are found in journals with the highest impact factors: Nature, Science, Cell, Cell Stem Cell, Stem Cell Reports, etc). Please contact Annemiek in case you are at a loss, and she will help you find one.
  
Good luck, and looking forward to seeing you again in my stem cell lecture on 27 October!
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During the presentation, it works best if one student discusses the introduction, the second the results section, and the third the discussion section. Please note that one slide takes about 1 minute to talk through. So do not use more than 15 to 20 slides total. Please read through the tips below on how to prepare a good presentation.
  
==Assessment==
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Each other group will ask at least one question following a journal club presentation.
===General===
 
Overall a really good effort to present complex research data by students who have not yet been exposed to research very often. Most student group had put a lot of effort in putting together a presentation, and usually presentations were well structured. Most presentations were within time. Slide lay out was okay, but could be improved. The students depended too much on text on the slides. The text was often read out. This does not demonstrate or aid comprehension.  Images were not used effectively; result panels should be talked through carefully. Always incorporate discussion of methods in description of relevant results section. Do not discuss as a separate section.
 
  
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Your group will receive the same mark, which will contribute to your individual assessment. This mark will be based on:
  
Think of the following when presenting a journal club in the future:
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- insight and comprehension,
* Use lots of images or figure panels, and very little text, on your slides.
 
* Understand the article and the experiments in depth, and know the main messages of each of your slides by heart.
 
* Talk through each results panel very carefully.
 
* Do only use images if you talk about them.
 
* Rehearse presentation, as improvisation is very very hard, especially with limited time that usually is available.
 
  
'''Introduction''' should give all necessary background to understand the biology of the study, and why the study is important. Do not summarize experimental outcomes as even though this is usually summarized in the very last introduction section. The outcomes will be discussed subsequently in results section, and summarized at the start of the discussion.
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- presentation and slide style,
  
'''Results''' when talking through start with formulating the aim of experiment 1, then discuss technical approach of exp1 shortly (not too much detail!), discuss the results of exp1: what are outcomes in test vs control groups, what is the conclusion of experiment1. Then make a link to next experiment if you can. Then repeat sequence for exp 2, 3, 4, etc.
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- engagement in question time and discussion,  
  
'''Discussion''' start with quick summary of all experimental results. Then place in larger context. What do we learn from data. How is this of benefit for human health.
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- keeping within time.
  
  
{|
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All students of the group are required to contribute to developing and/or presenting the group presentation. If a student fails to to so, this will result in a penalty of the final mark. Please contact Annemiek per email if you feel that a group member did not contribute. She will deal with this confidentially.
! Group
 
! Comment
 
! Mark (10)
 
|-bgcolor="F5FAFF"
 
| 1/8
 
|
 
* Lots of effort to place article in larger context
 
* Slide lay out could be improved: lots of empty space, use larger images and talk through them
 
* Results presentation a bit convoluted. Try to finish discussion of each experiment with a clear conclusion.
 
* Repetition of information towards the end
 
* One presenter had an unprofessional style of presentation
 
| 7
 
|-
 
| 2
 
|
 
* Good well-structured presentation
 
* Good introduction
 
* Methods discussed separately. Try to avoid this, and incorporate in discussion of experiments. Not sure if technology was understood very well.
 
| 7.5
 
|-bgcolor="F5FAFF"
 
| 3
 
|
 
* Good well-structured presentation
 
* Do not discuss methods as a separate section
 
* Discussion of results not always very clear, comprehension?
 
| 7.5
 
|-
 
| 4
 
|
 
* Good well-structured presentation
 
* Lots of text on slides, improve talking through images, blow up images
 
* Good discussion
 
| 8.5
 
|-bgcolor="F5FAFF"
 
| 5
 
|
 
* Good well-structured presentation, amount of text on slides relatively good.
 
* Figures too small, discussion bit convoluted
 
* Slightly over time
 
| 8.5
 
|-
 
| 6
 
|
 
* Good comprehension and well-structured presentation.
 
* Too much text on slides
 
* Experiments discussed in a lot of detail. Try to be more concise and discuss aim of experiment, approach, summarize results, conclude.
 
* No talking through figures
 
| 8.5
 
|-bgcolor="F5FAFF"
 
| 7
 
|
 
* Good well-structured presentation, great introduction, inclusion of images in presentation done relatively well.
 
* Methods discussed separately. Incorporate methods in discussion of the experiments in the results section.
 
* Try not to depend too much on text on your slides
 
* Talking through results images was not very clear, comprehension?
 
| 7.5
 
|}
 
  
----
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Good luck and have fun!
{{2014ANAT2341}}
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=Presentation Hints for Student=
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1. Keep your presentation short and concise. Not every detail of the article needs to be discussed in the presentation, but limit it to the bare minimum that is required to get the main message of the article across. For instance, do not go into too much detail in method sections. Not all nitty-gritty detail of the results needs to be discussed. The less info your audience has to take in, the higher the chance that they will understand your story.
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 +
2. Split the presentation up in three parts: introduction, Results and Discussion. Do not talk through the Material and Methods Sections separately!
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- '''Introduction''' equips the audience with the information required to understand the the research, and supports the research hypothesis and research questions addressed in the article.
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- The '''results''' sections consists of multiple sections. Talk through each of these sections in the following sequence: 1. research question asked, 2. assays and methods used to address this question, 3. experimental outcomes, 4. conclusions.
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- The '''discussion''' summarizes and interprets the outcomes, discusses the shortfalls, places the results in the larger context of the research fields, discusses the implications of the data for human disease, and issues raised by the findings and future experiments that will may resolve these questions.
 +
 
 +
3. Use mostly figures and very limited text on your slides. Make sure that you know and understand what you want to get across. Do not use cheat sheets and do not learn your presentation literally by heart. Explain carefully. Use your slides as cheat sheets. Make eye contact with your audience and get a feel for whether they understand your story.
 +
 
 +
4. Talk your audience carefully through each of the slides and engage with the slides and with your audience to gauge their understanding. Slides are an indispensable part of the presentation. Each item on your slides should be relevant and addressed and highlighted with pointer, fingers, stick. Slide shows are indispensable for a presentation, as is the presenter. They should support and enhance a presentation, they should aid your audience in understanding.
 +
 
 +
5. Talk your audience through each of the figures on your slides. Figures may be obvious to you, but not to your audience unless you explain them carefully. So explain what experiment has been carried out, and what is displayed in the figure:
 +
        on the X and Y-axes
 +
        what the bars represent in diagrams
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        the tissues/cell types displayed
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        the bands on Western blot, RNA and DNA gels,
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        What colors represent colors in immunostainings, etc etc.
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 +
6. Please note that you only need to highlight this experimental detail that is necessary to get the main message of the figure across.
 +
 
 +
7. Annotate the figures in your presentation carefully but sparingly. Label panels, axes, images etc so that figures are self-explicatory.
 +
 
 +
8. To stay in control the presenter should flick through the slide show. Not another member of the team.
 +
 
 +
9. If you didn’t understand the articles in depth, read a recent review or even go back to text books to acquire the basic knowledge. Also, if you discuss results of a crucial experiment but do not understand the technology. Please go back to the original references or your text books to read up on this technology. You should be on top of everything you say or write up in your slides.
 +
 
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10. Stick to your time. Don’t make too many slides. Each slide should take about a minute on average to talk through. Try to avoid acronyms and abbreviation.
 +
 
 +
 
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<br>
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{{2018ANAT2341}}

Latest revision as of 08:33, 10 October 2018

QUIZ

Stem Cell Paper Presentation

As part of the assessment for this course, your group will give a 15 minutes journal club presentation (including 3 minutes question time) in the final lab 12 on 23 October.

This assignment will allow you to apply the knowledge that your acquired in the stem cell lecture, and it will teach you to search journal databases, to become familiar with the research field of stem cell biology, and to improve your presentation skills.

You will discuss a recent (published after 2013) original research article (not a review!) on stem cell biology or technology.

Please send the PDFs of 2-3 articles to Annemiek (A.Beverdam@unsw.edu.au) by 5 pm on Tuesday 16 October. She will judge suitability and select the best article for the journal club.

Please note that the best articles are found in journals with the highest impact factors: Nature, Science, Cell, Cell Stem Cell, Stem Cell Reports, etc). Please contact Annemiek in case you are at a loss, and she will help you find one.

During the presentation, it works best if one student discusses the introduction, the second the results section, and the third the discussion section. Please note that one slide takes about 1 minute to talk through. So do not use more than 15 to 20 slides total. Please read through the tips below on how to prepare a good presentation.

Each other group will ask at least one question following a journal club presentation.

Your group will receive the same mark, which will contribute to your individual assessment. This mark will be based on:

- insight and comprehension,

- presentation and slide style,

- engagement in question time and discussion,

- keeping within time.


All students of the group are required to contribute to developing and/or presenting the group presentation. If a student fails to to so, this will result in a penalty of the final mark. Please contact Annemiek per email if you feel that a group member did not contribute. She will deal with this confidentially.

Good luck and have fun!


Presentation Hints for Student

1. Keep your presentation short and concise. Not every detail of the article needs to be discussed in the presentation, but limit it to the bare minimum that is required to get the main message of the article across. For instance, do not go into too much detail in method sections. Not all nitty-gritty detail of the results needs to be discussed. The less info your audience has to take in, the higher the chance that they will understand your story.

2. Split the presentation up in three parts: introduction, Results and Discussion. Do not talk through the Material and Methods Sections separately!

- Introduction equips the audience with the information required to understand the the research, and supports the research hypothesis and research questions addressed in the article. - The results sections consists of multiple sections. Talk through each of these sections in the following sequence: 1. research question asked, 2. assays and methods used to address this question, 3. experimental outcomes, 4. conclusions. - The discussion summarizes and interprets the outcomes, discusses the shortfalls, places the results in the larger context of the research fields, discusses the implications of the data for human disease, and issues raised by the findings and future experiments that will may resolve these questions.

3. Use mostly figures and very limited text on your slides. Make sure that you know and understand what you want to get across. Do not use cheat sheets and do not learn your presentation literally by heart. Explain carefully. Use your slides as cheat sheets. Make eye contact with your audience and get a feel for whether they understand your story.

4. Talk your audience carefully through each of the slides and engage with the slides and with your audience to gauge their understanding. Slides are an indispensable part of the presentation. Each item on your slides should be relevant and addressed and highlighted with pointer, fingers, stick. Slide shows are indispensable for a presentation, as is the presenter. They should support and enhance a presentation, they should aid your audience in understanding.

5. Talk your audience through each of the figures on your slides. Figures may be obvious to you, but not to your audience unless you explain them carefully. So explain what experiment has been carried out, and what is displayed in the figure:

       on the X and Y-axes
       what the bars represent in diagrams
       the tissues/cell types displayed
       the bands on Western blot, RNA and DNA gels,
       What colors represent colors in immunostainings, etc etc.

6. Please note that you only need to highlight this experimental detail that is necessary to get the main message of the figure across.

7. Annotate the figures in your presentation carefully but sparingly. Label panels, axes, images etc so that figures are self-explicatory.

8. To stay in control the presenter should flick through the slide show. Not another member of the team.

9. If you didn’t understand the articles in depth, read a recent review or even go back to text books to acquire the basic knowledge. Also, if you discuss results of a crucial experiment but do not understand the technology. Please go back to the original references or your text books to read up on this technology. You should be on top of everything you say or write up in your slides.

10. Stick to your time. Don’t make too many slides. Each slide should take about a minute on average to talk through. Try to avoid acronyms and abbreviation.



 2018 ANAT2341 - Timetable | Course Outline | Moodle | Tutorial 1 | Tutorial 2 | Tutorial 3

Labs: 1 Preimplantation and Implantation | 2 Reproductive Technology Revolution | 3 Group Projects | 4 GM manipulation mouse embryos | 5 Early chicken eggs | 6 Female reproductive tract | 7 Skin regeneration | 8 Vertebral development | 9 Organogenesis Lab | 10 Cardiac development | 11 Group projects | 12 Stem Cell Journal Club

Lectures: 1 Introduction | 2 Fertilization | 3 Week 1/2 | 4 Week 3 | 5 Ectoderm | 6 Placenta | 7 Mesoderm | 8 Endoderm | 9 Research Technology | 10 Cardiovascular | 11 Respiratory | 12 Neural crest | 13 Head | 14 Musculoskeletal | 15 Limb | 16 Renal | 17 Genital | 18 Endocrine | 19 Sensory | 20 Fetal | 21 Integumentary | 22 Birth | 23 Stem cells | 24 Revision

 Student Projects: Group Projects Information Project 1 | Project 3 | Project 4 | Project 5 | 2018 Test Student | Copyright