Embryology History - Warren Lewis

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Introduction

Warren H Lewis
Warren H Lewis (I870 - 1964)

Warren Harmon Lewis (June 17, I870 - July 3, 1964)

See the 1964 Corner biography[1] from which some excerpts have been included below.

In 1910 he contributed a book chapter on muscular development to the two volume Keibel and Mall embryology textbook.[2] Later in 1921 along with Mall published a review of abnormal human embryo development.[3]

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., U. S. A.

Embryologists: William Hunter | Wilhelm Roux | Caspar Wolff | Wilhelm His | Julius Kollmann | Hans Spemann | Charles Minot | Ambrosius Hubrecht | Charles Bardeen | Franz Keibel | Franklin Mall | Florence Sabin | George Streeter | George Corner | James Hill | Jan Florian | Thomas Bryce | Thomas Morgan | Ernest Frazer | Francisco Orts-Llorca | José Doménech Mateu | Frederic Lewis | Arthur Meyer | Erich Blechschmidt | Klaus Hinrichsen | Hideo Nishimura | Arthur Hertig | John Rock | Viktor Hamburger | Mary Lyon | Nicole Le Douarin | Robert Winston | Fabiola Müller | Ronan O'Rahilly | Robert Edwards | John Gurdon | Shinya Yamanaka | Embryology History | Category:People
Related Histology Researchers  
Santiago Ramón y Cajal | Camillo Golgi

Biography Excerpts

In the fall of 1896 Lewis entered the Medical School of The Johns Hopkins University, as a member of the fourth class to study at that young school which was drawing many students of great promise from all parts of the country. His professors were of the highest distinction: the famous “Four Doctors” of Sargent’s painting, Welch, Halsted, Osler, and Kelly; and even more important for a student with scientific interests, John J. Abel, William H. Howell, and, in anatomy, Franklin P. Mall. Lewis was strongly attracted to Mall’s department, of which Charles R. Bardeen and Ross G. Harrison were then senior members. When Lewis, immediately after his graduation in medicine, in 1900, joined the department as assistant in anatomy, his medical classmates Florence R. Sabin and John Bruce MacCallum also became assistants in the same department. All these young anatomists (Mall himself was only thirty—four years of age when Lewis became his pupil) attained renown in American science. Every one of them (except the brilliant MacCallum, who died early) became in later years presidents of the American Association of Anatomists, and four of them were elected to the National Academy of Sciences.


Mall had assembled in his laboratory the largest collection of human embryos in America, and had made the study of human development a principal interest of his department. In that field Lewis undertook his first research, in collaboration with Bardeen, who was studying the embryological development of the human muscular system. In 1901 Lewis published in the Bulletin of the johns Hopkins Hospital his first paper, a description of the pectoralis major muscle and some of its variations. When, in the same year, the American joumal of Anatomy was launched from Mall’s laboratory, the first article in the first number was a joint paper by Bardeen and Lewis on the development of the muscles of the limbs and trunk. Based on skillful dissections and reconstructions, and handsomely illustrated, this report was far in advance of previous work in the field and remains the classical monograph on the subject. A year later Lewis published a detailed paper of his own, of equal excellence, on the development of the musculature of the arm.


About 1902 Lewis visited Europe and worked for a time in the laboratory of Moritz Nussbaum at Bonn, where at the professor’s suggestion he looked into the origin of the ciliary muscle of the eye. Nussbaum’s recent discovery (1901) that the sphincter pupillae and retractor lentis muscles, unlike most others, originate from ectodermal epithelium rather than mesenchyme had weakened the doctrine of rigid specificity of the outer germ layer. Nussbaum suspected that the ciliary muscle also is derived from ectoderm. Lewis, working with chick embryos, found no evidence for this supposition, but in the course of his study observed that wandering pigment cells which ultimately enter the iris originate from ectodermal tissue in the optic cup. This observation, published in 1903, was completely new. As the first evidence that pigment cells in the connective tissues may have originated in ectoderm, it considerably increased the embryologists’ growing doubts of the specificity of the germ layers. The great potentialities of the ectoderm, as of the other germ layers, have since been abundantly demonstrated.


In 1907 Lewis reported another set of embryological experiments of a kind never previously attempted. Following up hints from Wilhelm Roux and Thomas Hunt Morgan that the dorsal lip of the blastopore of the amphibian gastrula constitutes in some way a center of directive influence for the differentiation of organs and special tissues, Lewis transplanted small pieces of tissue from the lips of the blastopore (in the late gastrula stage) to other parts of the embryo and found that as expected they differentiated into structures characteristic of the embryonic axis. In one of these experiments he noted that the ectoderm under which he had placed one of the bits containing notochordal tissue was converted into the beginnings of a neural tube; but assuming, like Roux and Morgan, that the rim of the blastopore is self-differentiated, Lewis did not from this single case interpret the result as did Spemann, who from similar experiments a few years later developed the general organizer theory.


Although Lewis completed his models of Carnegie No. 460, he was too much involved, after 1911, in the pioneering work on tissue culture, which will be described a little later, to publish all the findings of the reconstruction. He wrote, in fact, only one paper on this embryo, a monograph of 1920 in the Carnegie Contributions to Embryology, describing the cartilaginous skull, which in this embryo was at a specially instructive stage of development.

Bibliography

  • Am. Anat. : American Journal of Anatomy
  • Am. J. Cancer : American Journal of Cancer
  • Am. Physiol. = American Journal of Physiology
  • Anat. Record = Anatomical Record
  • Arch. exp. Zellforsch. bes. Gewebeziicht. = Archiv fiir experimentelle Zellforschung besonders Gewebeziichtung
  • Biol. Bull. : Biological Bulletin
  • Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. = Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins Hos ital Calinegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol. : Carnegie Institution of
  • Washington Contributions to Embryology Carnegie Inst. Wash. News Service Bull. = Carnegie Institution of
  • Washington News Service Bulletin J. Exp. Med. — Journal of Experimental Medicine


1901

Observations on the pectoralis major muscle in man. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 12: 172-77.

Bardeen CR. and Lewis WH. The development of the limbs, body-wall and back. (1901) Amer. J Anat. 1: 1-36.

1902

With Jacques Loeb. On the prolongation of the life of the unfertilized eggs of sea urchins by potassium cyanide. Am. Physiol., 6:305-17.

Lewis WH. The development of the arm in man. (1902) Amer. J Anat. 1(2): 145-184.

1903

Wandering pigmented cells arising from the epithelium of the optic cup, with observations on the origin of the M. sphincter pupillae in the chick. Am. J. Anat., 2:405-16.

Experimental studies on the development of the eye in amphibia (abstract). Am. Anat. Suppl., 3:xiii-xv.

Experimental studies on the development of the eye in amphibia. I. On the origin of the lens. Rana palustris. Am. Anat., 3:505-36.

Development of foetus. In: Reference Handbook of the Medical

Sciences, ed. by Albert H. Buck, pp. 450-57. 2d ed., Vol. 8. New York, William Wood 8c Co.

1905

Experimental studies on the development of the eye in amphibia. II. On the cornea. Journal of Experimental Zoology, 2:43l—46.

1906

Experimental evidence in support of the outgrowth theory of the axis cylinder (abstract). Am. Anat. Suppl., 5:x-xi.

Experiments on the regeneration and dilferentiation of the central nervous system in amphibia (abstract), Am. J. Anat. Suppl., 5:xi.

1907

Experimental evidence in support of the theory of the outgrowth of the axis cylinder. Am. J. Anat., 6:461-71.

Experimental studies on the development of the eye in amphibia. III. On the origin and differentiation of the lens. Am. Anat., 6:/173-509.

Transplantation of the lips of the blastopore in Rana palustris. Am. J. Anat., 7:137-43.

On the origin and dilferentiation of the otic vesicle in amphibian embryos. Anat. Record, 1:141-44.

Lens formation from strange ectoderm in Rana sylvatica. Am. J. Anat., 7 :145-69.

Experiments on the origin and differentiation of the optic vesicle in amphibia. Am. J. Anat., 7:259-77.

1908

Review of Human Anatomy, ed. by George A. Piersol. Philadelphia, Lippincott, 1907. Anat. Record, 2:284-87.

The experimental production of cyclopia in the fish embryo (Fundulus heteroclitus). Anat. Record, 3:175—8l.

1910

The relation of the myotomes to the ventrolateral musculature and to the anterior limbs in amblystoma. Anat. Record, 4:183-90.

Localization and regeneration in the neural plate of amphibian embryos. Anat. Record, 4: 191-98.

Die Entwickelung des Muskelsystems. Kap. XII in: Handbuch der Entwickelungsgeschichte, redigt. von Franz Keibel u. F. P. Mall, 1:457-526. Leipzig, S. Hirzel.

Lewis WH. XII. The development of the muscular system pp 454-522 in Keibel F. and Mall FP. Manual of Human Embryology I. (1910) J. B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia.

With Margaret R. Lewis. The growth of embryonic chick tissues in artificial media, agar and bouillon. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 222126-27.

With Margaret R. Lewis. The cultivation of tissues from chick embryos in solutions of NaCl, CaCl2, KC], and NaHCO3. Anat. Record, 5:277-93.

With Margaret R. Lewis. The cultivation of tissues in salt solutions. Journal of the American Medical Association, 56:l79596.

1912

With Margaret R. Lewis. The cultivation of sympathetic nerves from the intestine of chick embryos in saline solutions. Anat. Record, 6:7-31.

Experiments on localization in the eggs of a teleost fish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Anat. Record, 6:1-6.

With Margaret R. Lewis. The cultivation of chick tissue in media of known chemical constitution. Anat. Record, 6:207-1 1.

With Margaret R. Lewis. Membrane formations from tisssue transplanted into artificial media. Anat. Record, 6:195-205.

Experiments on localization and regeneration in the embryonic shield and germ ring of a teleost fish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Anat. Record, 6:325-33.

1914

With Margaret R. Lewis. Mitochondria in tissue culture. Science, 39:330—33.

Development of the fetus. In: Reference Handbook of the Medical Sciences, ed. by T. L. Stedrnan, pp. 373-84. 3d ed., Vol. 4. New York, William Wood 8c Co.

1915

With Margaret R. Lewis. Mitochondria (and other cytoplasmic structures) in tissue cultures. Am. J. Anat., 17:339-401.

The use of guide planes and plaster of Paris for reconstructions from serial sections; some points on reconstruction. Anat. Rec ord, 9:719-29.

1917

With Margaret R. Lewis. The contraction of smooth muscle cells in tissue cultures. Am. J. Physiol., 44:67-74.

With Margaret R. Lewis. Behavior of cross striated muscle in tissue cultures. Am. J. Anat., 22: 169-94. With Margaret R. Lewis. The duration of the various phases of mitosis in the mesenchyme cells of tissue cultures. Anat. Record, 13:35!)-67.

1918

Editor. Anatomy of the Human Body, by Henry Gray. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Lea and Febiger. 1,396 pp.

1919

Degeneration granules and vacuoles in the fibroblasts of chick embryos cultivated in vitro. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 30:81-91.

The centriole and centrosphere in degenerating fibroblasts of tissue cultures (abstract). Anat. Record, 16:155.

The behavior of the centriole and the centrosphere in the degenerating fibroblasts of tissue cultures (abstract). Am. J. Physiol., 49:123.

1920

Giant centrospheres in degenerating mesenchyme cells of tissue cultures. J. Exp. Med., 31:275-92.

The action of potassium permanganate on the mesenchyme cells in tissue cultures (abstract). Anat., Record, 18:240.

The cartilaginous skull of a human embryo twenty-one millimeters in length. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol., 9:299-324.

1921

With Leslie T. Webster. Migration of lymphocytes in plasma cultures of human lymph nodes. Exp. Med., 33:26l—69.

With Leslie T. Webster. Giant cells in cultures from human lymph nodes. J. exp. Med., 33:349-60.

The effect of potassium permanganate on the mesenchyme cells of tissue cultures. Am. ]. Anat., 28:43]-45. The characteristics of the various types of cells found in tissue cul tures from chick embryos (abstract). Anat. Record, 21:71-72.

Smooth muscle and endothelium in tissue cultures (abstract). Anat. Record, 21:72.

With Leslie T. Webster. Wandering cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts in cultures from human lymph nodes. J. Exp. Med., 34:397-405.

1922

Endothelium in tissue cultures. Am. J. Anat., 30:89-59.

Is mesenchyme or smooth muscle a syncytium or an adherent reticulum? (Abstract.) Anat. Record, 23:26.

With Charles C. McCoy. Survival of cells after the death of the animal (abstract). Anat. Record, 23:27.

Is mesenchyme a syncytiumP Anat. Record, 23: 177-84.

The adhesive quality of cells. Anat. Record, 23:387-92.

With Charles C. McCoy. The survival of cells after the death of the organism. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 33:284-93.

The transformation of mesenchyme into mesothelium in tissue cultures (abstract). Anat. Record, 25:111.

Cultivation of heart muscle from chick embryos (four to eleven days old) in Locke-bouillon-dextrose medium (abstract). Anat. Record, 25: l 1 1.

Observations on cells in tissue-cultures with dark-field illumination. Anat. Record, 26: 15-29.

Mesenchyme and mesothelium. J. Exp. Med., 38:257-62.

Pathological changes in the cells of tissue cultures. Annual Gross Lecture (abstract). Proceedings of the Pathological Society of Philadelphia, 25:76-80.

Amniotic ectoderm in tissue-cultures. Anat. Record, 26:97-117.

With George 0. Gey. Clasmatocytes and tumor cells in cultures of mouse sarcoma. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 342369-71.

1924

Hofbauer cells (clasmatocytes) of the human chorionic villus. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 35:l83—85.

The influence of temperature on the rhythm of the isolated heart of the young chick embryo. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 35:25257.

Editor. Anatomy of the Human Body, by Henry Gray. 21st ed. Philadelphia, Lea and Febiger. 1,417 pp.

With Margaret R. Lewis. Behavior of cells in tissue culture. Section VII in: General Cytology, ed. by E. V. Cowdry, pp. 383447. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.

1925

With Margaret R. Lewis and Henry S. Willis. The epithelioid cells of tuberculous lesions. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 36: 175-84; also in Tubercle, 6:329-35.

With Margaret R. Lewis. Monocytes, macrophages, epithelioid cells, and giant cells (abstract). Anat. Record, 29:391.

Cell inclusions, vital dyes, and the so—called “segregation apparatus" (abstract). Anat. Record, 29:391.

With Margaret R. Lewis. The transformation of leucocytes into macrophages, epithelioid cells and giant cells in cultures of pure blood (abstract). Am. J. Physiol., 72:196.

With Margaret R. Lewis. The transformation of white blood cells into dasmatocytes (macrophages), epithelioid cells, and giant cells. Journal of the American Medical Association, 84:798-99.

The engulfment of living blood cells by others of the same type. Anat. Record, 31:43-47.

1926

Macrophages in sterile inflammation of the deep fascia of the rat (abstract). Anat. Record, 32:215.

Macrophages of the deep fascia of the thigh of the rat in spreads supravitally stained with neutral red and with janus green (abstract). Anat. Record, 32:215.

On the possibility of the transformation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes into mononuclears, epithelioid cells, and macrophages in cultures of the bully coat of the blood of the rat (abstract). Anat. Record, 32:216.

With B. E. Briide. A modified white-blood-cell tumor of the rat. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 38:376-78.

Cultivation of embryonic heart-muscle. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol., 18:1-21.

With Margaret R. Lewis. Transformation of mononuclear blood cells into macrophages, epithelioid cells and giant cells in hanging—drop blood cultures from lower vertebrates. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol., 18:95-120.

The transformation of mononuclear blood cells into macrophages, epithelioid cells, and giant cells. Harvey Lectures, 21:77-112.

Formation of giant cells in tissue cultures (abstract). Transactions of the National Tuberculosis Association, 22 :260-64.

1927

The formation of giant cells in tissue cultures and their similarity to those in tuberculous lesions. American Review of Tuberculosis, l5:6l6-28.

Migration of neutrophilic leucocytes. Arch. exp. Zellforsch. bes. Gewebeziicht, 4:442-43.

The vascular patterns of tumors. Bull. johns Hopkins Hosp., 41:l56-62.

Sarcoma cells. Arch. exp. Zellforsch. bes. Gewebeziicht., 5:143-56.

Binudeate cells and giant cells in tissue cultures and the similarity of the latter to the giant cells of tuberculous lesions. Tubercle, 8:317-30.

1928

The transformation of mononuclear blood cells into macrophages, epithelioid cells, and giant cells. Arch. exp. Zellforsch. bes. Gewebeziicht., 6:253-59.

Comparative study of fish blood. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Year Book No. 27:279-80.

1929

The effect of various solutions and salts on the pulsation rate of isolated hearts from young chick embryos. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol., 20: 173-92.

Macrophages and other cells of the deep fascia of the thigh of the rat. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol., 20:193-212.

With Paul W. Gregory. Cinematographs of living developing rabbit eggs. Science, 692226-29.

Review of Special Cytology, ed. by Edmund V. Cowdry. New York, Hoeber. Science, 69:250.

Some contributions of tissue cultures to pathology. Archives of Pathology, 8:873-77.

1930

Moving pictures of normal cells (abstract). Anat. Record, 45:229.

Indications of secretory activity of the glomerular epithelium of the rat kidney (abstract). Anat. Record, 45:269.

Editor. Anatomy of the Human Body, by Henry Gray. 22d ed. Philadelphia, Lea and Febiger. 1,391 pp.

With Carl. G. Hartman, Fred W. Miller, and Walter W. Swett. first findings of tubal ova in the cow, together with notes on oestrus. Anat. Record, 48:267-75.

An unfertilized human tubal egg (abstract). Anat. Record Suppl., 48:52.

Living mouse eggs (abstract). Anat. Record Suppl., 48:52.

On the locomotion of lymphocytes. Anat. Record Suppl., 48:52-53.

With Carl G. Hartman. Three living monkey eggs in cleavage, with motion pictures of one. Anat. Record Suppl., 48:53.

The outgrowth of endothelium and capillaries in tissue culture. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 48:242-53.

A human egg, unfertilized. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 48:368-72.

Pinocytosis. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 49: 17-26.

Locomotion of lymphocytes. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 49: 29-36.

With Fred W. Miller, Walter W. Swett, and Carl G. Hartman. A study of ova from the fallopian tubes of dairy cows, with a genital history of the cows. Journal of Agricultural Research, 43:627-36.

1932

Motion pictures of dividing bipolar and tripolar sarcoma cells (abstract). Anat. Record Suppl., 52:23.

The locomotion rate of rat lymphocytes in plasma cultures (abstract). Anat. Record Suppl., 52:65.

With Margaret R. Lewis. Further studies on the inactivation of tumor-producing viruses by means of dyes. Am. Cancer, 16: 333-44.

With Margaret R. Lewis. The malignant cells of Walker rat sarcoma No. 338. Am. J. Cancer, l6:1153-83.

With Mitchell I. Rubin. Changes in neutrophiles and monocytes in cultures of the buflfy coat of human blood in serum. Anat. Record, 53:249-54.

Motion pictures of dividing bipolar and tripolar sarcoma cells (abstract). Proceedings of the 6th International Genetics Congress, 1—2:399.

With Mitchell 1. Rubin. The white cells in cultures of the bully coat of human blood (abstract). Bulletin of the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, l932:32.

1933

Locomotion of rat lymphocytes in tissue cultures. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 53:l47-57.

With Carl G. Hartman. Early cleavage stages of the egg of the monkey (Macacus rhesus). Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol., 24:187-201.

On the early development of the mouse egg (abstract). Bulletin of the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, l933:l7-l8.

With Margaret R. Lewis. Some characteristics of tumor cells. Carnegie Inst. Wash. News Service Bull., 3: 105-12.

1934

Malignant sarcoma cells (abstract). Anat. Record Suppl., 58:2526.

Roller tube cultures (abstract). ,Anat. Record Suppl., 58:75-76.

On the locomotion of the polymorphonuclear neutrophiles of the rat in autoplasma cultures. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 55: 273-79.

Living malignant sarcoma cells (abstract). Bulletin of the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, 1934:2627.

1935

Normal and malignant cells (presidential address, American Association of Anatomists). Science, 81 :545-53.

With Elsie Starr Wright. On the early development of the mouse egg. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol., 25: 1 13-44.

Roller tube cultures of rat tumor cells and some results (abstract). Bulletin of the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, 1935: 18-19.

Rat malignant cells in roller tube cultures and some results. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol., 25:16l-72.

Pinocytosis (abstract). Anat. Record Supp1., 64:68. Editor. Anatomy of the Human Body, by Henry Gray. 23d ed. Philadelphia, Lea and Febiger. 1,381 pp. Malignant cells. Harvey Lectures, 31 :2l4-34.

1937

With Joseph Victor. Metabolism of pure cultures of malignant cells of Walker rat sarcoma 319. Am. J. Cancer, 29:503-9.

Motion picture of pinocytosis by malignant sarcoma cells (abstract). Anat. Record Suppl., 67:64.

Pinocytosis by malignant cells. Am. J. Cancer, 29:666-79.

Malignant cells. Proceedings of the Stalf Meetings of the Mayo Clinic, l2:250-52.

The cultivation and cytology of cancer cells. Occasional Publications of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 4:119-20.

1938

Review of The Culture of Organs, by Alexis Carrel and Charles A. Lindbergh. New York, Harper 8c Brothers. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 63:205-6.

Review of Methods of Tissue Culture, by Raymond G. Parker. New York, Harper 8c Brothers. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 63:206.

With Margaret R. Lewis. Studies on white blood cells. Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ., No. 5012369-82.

Tissue culture in the study of cancer. In: Symposium on Cancer, pp. 101-13. Madison, University of Wisconsin Press.

Exhibition of motion picture film picture on locomotion of cells, on mitosis, and on pinocytosis. Biomorphosis, 1:325.

1939

On the role of a superficial plasmagel layer in division, locomotion, and changes in the form of cells (abstract). Arch. exp. Ze1lforsch. bes. Gewebez1'icht., 22:270. 356

The role of a superficial plasmagel layer in changes of form, 10comotion, and division of cells in tissue cultures. Arch. exp. Zellforsch. bes. Gewebeziicht., 23: 1-7.

Some cultural and cytological characteristics of normal and malignant cells in vitro. Arch. exp. Zellforsch. bes. Gewebez1'icht., 23:8-26.

Contorted mitosis and superficial plasmagel layer. Am. J. Cancer, 35:408-15.

Changes of viscosity and cell activity (abstract). Science, 89:400.

Dibenzanthracene mouse sarcomas; histology. Am. Cancer, 37: 521-30.

Cultural and cytological characteristics of normal and of malignant cells in vitro (abstract). Arch. exp. Zellforsch. bes. Gewebe z1'icht., 22:316. 1940

On the chromosomal nature of nucleoli. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp., 66:60-64.

Motion picture of dividing fibroblasts (abstract). Anat. Record Suppl., 76:91.

Some contributions of tissue culture to development and growth. Symposium on Development and Growth, 1939. Growth, Supplement l:l-14.

1941

Some characteristics of malignant cells. Cause and growth of cancer. University of Pennsylvania Bicentennial Conference, pp. 41-49. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press.

With Carl G. Hartman. Tubal ova of the rhesus monkey. Car negie Inst. Wash. Contrib. Embryol., 29:7-14. 1942

Cell division. Motion picture demonstration (abstract). American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 203:467-68.

With Edward C. Roosen-Runge. The formation of the blastodisc in the egg of the zebra fish, Brachydanio rerio, illustrated with motion pictures (abstract). Anat. Record Suppl., 84:463-64.

The relation of the viscosity changes of protoplasm to ameboid locomotion and cell division. In: A Symposium on the Structure of Protoplasm, ed. by W. Seifritz, pp. 163-97. Ames, Iowa State College Press.

With others. Editor. Anatomy of the Human Body, by Henry Gray. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Lea and Febiger. 1,428 pp.

The formation of the blastodisc in the egg of the zebra fish, Brachydanio rerio (abstract). Anat. Record, 85:326.

The role of the superficial gel layer in gastrulation of the zebra fish egg (abstract). Anat. Record, 85:326.

Rhabdomyosarcoma; rat tumor 92. Institute of Cancer Research, Columbia University, New York. Cancer Research, 3:867-71.

1943

Nucleolar vacuoles in living normal and malignant fibroblasts. Cancer Research, 3:531-36.

1944

The superficial gel layer and its role in development (abstract). Biol. Bull., 87:154.

1945

Axon growth and regeneration (abstract). Anat. Record, 91:287. With Albert G. Richards, Jr. Non-toxicity of DDT on cells in culture. Science, 102: 330-31.

1947

Mechanics of invagination. Anat. Record, 97 :l39-56.

Interphase (resting) nuclei, chromosomal vacuoles, and arnitosis. Anat. Record, 97:433-55.

1948

Mitosis and cell size. Anat. Record, 100:247-54.

With Edmund Farris, Carl Bachman, and Craig W. Muckle. Follicle and corpus luteum development in the human ovary (abstract). Anat. Record, 100:766.

Mitosis of normal and malignant cells in tissue cultures (abstract). Anat. Record, 1012698-99.

Mechanics of amblystoma gastrulation (abstract). Anat. Record, 1012700.

Early development of zebra fish egg (abstract). Anat. Record, 101: 700.

1949

The superficial gel layer of cells and eggs (abstract). Anat. Record, l03:483-84.

Retardation and reversal of amblystoma gastrulation (abstract). Anat. Record, l03:550.

Gel layers of cells and eggs and their role in early development. Roscoe B. Jackson Memorial Laboratories Lecture Series, 1949: 59-77.

Superficial gel layers of cells and eggs and their role in early development. Anales del Instituto de Biologia (Universidad Nacional de Mexico), 20:44l—54.

1950

Locomotion of the giant amoeba, Chaos chaos (abstract). Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Experimental Cytology, p. 41.

Motion picture of neurons and neuroglia in tissue culture. In: Genetic Neurology, ed. by Paul Weiss, pp. 53-65. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.

1951

Cell division with special reference to cells in tissue cultures. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 5l:l287-94.

Locomotion of Chaos chaos, the giant ameba (abstract). Science, ll3:473.

1952

Gastrulation of Amblystoma punctatum. (Motion picture.) Anat. Record, ll2:473.

1955

Structure and locomotion of the ameba, Pelomyxa villosa (abstract). Anat. Record, l2l:330.

Reference

  1. Corner GW. Warren Harmon Lewis 1870-1964 A Biographical Memoir. (1964) National Academy Of Sciences 324-345. PDF
  2. Lewis WH. XII. The development of the muscular system pp 454-522 in Keibel F. and Mall FP. Manual of Human Embryology I. (1910) J. B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia.
  3. Mall FP. and Meyer AW. Studies on abortuses: a survey of pathologic ova in the Carnegie Embryological Collection. (1921) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 275, 12: 1-364.




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