Q

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Q

Chromosome structure
Chromosome structure

q

q (Q) used as a single letter code for the amino acid Glutamine, one of the 20 common amino acids that form protein and also represented by the 3 letter code "Gln".
q used to identify the chromosome long arm (possibly French, tall), the next letter in alphabet after p, and used along with chromosome and band number to indicate genes located on this arm of the chromosome. The chromosome short arm is identified as p (possibly French, petit). These chromosomal arms are only seen when the chromosome is folded for cell division.
(More? Molecular Development | Genetics | Mitosis | Meiosis)

Q-banding

A genetics term used to describe a technique for staining chromosomes during metaphase. The resulting banding pattern is seen by treating with a fluorochrome or the fluorescent dye quinacrin. There are several other chromosome staining techniques, including G-banding, R-banding and C-banding.
(More? Molecular Development - Genetics)

Q fever

Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii), a species of bacteria that is distributed globally. In 1999, Q fever became a notifiable disease in the United States but reporting is not required in many other countries. Because the disease is underreported, scientists cannot reliably assess how many cases of Q fever have actually occurred worldwide.  Many human infections are inapparent. Cattle, sheep, and goats are the primary reservoirs of Coxiella burnetii.  Infection has been noted in a wide variety of other animals, including other species of livestock and in domesticated pets.  Coxiella burnetii does not usually cause clinical disease in these animals, although abortion in goats and sheep has been linked to C. burnetii infection.  Organisms are excreted in milk, urine, and feces of infected animals.(text modified from CDC USA)
(More? Image - Coxiella burnetii | Zoonotic Infection | The Australian Q Fever Register | CDC (USA) Q Fever

QF-PCR

acronym for Quantitative Fluorescent Polymerase Chain Reaction. A molecular biology DNA amplification technique that incorporates a flourescent marker into synthesized at a quantifiable rate. Technique is also being developed as a prenatal diagnostic technique for chromosomal anomalies and aneuploidies (chromosomes 13, 18 and 21, and X and Y).
(More? Prenatal Diagnosis)

quail

A small bird used in embryo transplant experiments with chicken. Quail cells have a distinctive nucleolus allowing transplanted cells to be easily identified using histological stains and have therefore been used in studies of neural crest and limb development.
(More? Chicken Development | Neural Crest Development | Embryology History - Nicole Le Douarin)

quantitative fluorescent PCR

A molecular biology DNA amplification technique that incorporates a flourescent marker into synthesized at a quantifiable rate. Technique is also being developed as a prenatal diagnostic technique for chromosomal anomalies and aneuploidies (chromosomes 13, 18 and 21, and X and Y).
(More? Prenatal Diagnosis)

quiet embryo hypothesis

A hypothesis that suggests viable embryos have a "quieter" metabolism than those which arrest. Based on experimental data on the net depletion or release of nutrients (pyruvate, glucose, lactate and amino acids) and on oxygen consumption.
(More? PMID 19019836)


Glossary Comments

Use this page to access brief definitions of specific embryology terms. Additional information can be accessed from links listed at the end of each definition. Glossary from the UNSW Embryology program compiled and written by Dr Mark Hill. Reference material used in preparing this glossary list includes: texts listed on page 1 "Reading" of each notes section, Department of Anatomy Publications, WWW resources from NCBI, NIH, OMIM, NHMRC (Australia), AMA (USA), Office of Rare Diseases (USA), PubMed Medline Dictionaries, MSDS, Merck Manual home edn. and WHO ART terminology (2009).

These notes are for Educational Purposes Only Please email Dr Mark Hill if you wish to make a comment about this current project.


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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. 2017 Embryology Q. Retrieved September 25, 2017, from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Q

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© Dr Mark Hill 2017, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G