Book - Uterine and tubal gestation (1903) 1-11

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A personal message from Dr Mark Hill (May 2020)  
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I have decided to take early retirement in September 2020. During the many years online I have received wonderful feedback from many readers, researchers and students interested in human embryology. I especially thank my research collaborators and contributors to the site. The good news is Embryology will remain online and I will continue my association with UNSW Australia. I look forward to updating and including the many exciting new discoveries in Embryology!

Bandler SW. Uterine and tubal gestation. (1903) William Wood & Company, New York.

Uterine and Tubal Gestation (1903): Part I. The Essentials of Uterine Gestation I. The Processes Antedating Uterine Gestation | II. The Embedding of the Ovum in the Guinea-Pig | III. The Embedding of the Human Ovum | IV. The Early Development of the Human Ovum | V. The Trophoblast in the Ova of Animals | VI. The Trophoblast of the Human Ovum | VII. The Further Development of the Human Ovum | VIII. The Chorionic Villi | IX. The Membrana Chorii | X. The Blood-Forming Function of the Trophoblast | XI. The Further Development of the Uterine Placenta | XII. The Placenta | XIII. The Umbilical Vessels and Cord | XIV. Gross Anatomy of the Placenta Part II. The Essentials of Tubal Gestation I. Processes Antedating Gestation in the Tube | II. Varying Views Concerning the Histology of Tubal Gestation | III. Embedding of the Ovum and the Development of Extra-Embryonal structures | Part III. Ovarian and Placental Secretion
Online Editor 
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This early historic 1903 textbook by Samuel Wyllis Bandler (1869-1932) described the understanding of human normal and abnormal implantation at that time. Some of these historic theories described in this textbook have now proved inaccurate or incorrect. Note that all early human developmental stages were still described as the "ovum", today this would be described as the zygote, morula, and blastocyst stages with implantation occurring in week 2.


PDF | Internet Archive

Also by this author: The Endocrines (1921)

Modern Notes: implantation | placenta | ectopic pregnancy | Week 2 | blastocyst

Search PubMed: embryo implantation

Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
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Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Part I. The Essentials of Uterine Gestation

Chapter XI. The Further Development of the Uterine Placenta

Just as during the early weeks the trophoblast invades the trophospongia or Template:Decidua, so after the formation of villi is the further course of the ectodermal trophobast and syncytial cells of a destructive character, so far as the decidua is concerned. Fig. 39 presents a fetal sac in situ in the sixth or seventh week of uterine gestation. The specimen from which the drawing was constructed was unfortunately distorted, yet the important relations are very clear.


Fig. 39. — Uterus and fetal sac in situ — 7 weeks — two-thirds the size of the specimen when mounted, and one-half the size of the specimen before hardening. y, decidua vera with numerous glands, i.e., well-marked spongiosa ; x, decidua vera with compacta compressed through pressure of the sac, and evidencing few flattened glands in the spongiosa.


The capsularis, to which villi are attached, is full of darkly-staining trophoblast cells, between which and through which are blood spaces and blood extravasations. Opposite it, but not yet in contact, is the decidua vera, flattened by pressure of the growing sac, and composed of pure decidua divided into a superficial layer, the compacta, and a deeper layer of flattened glands, the spongiosa (Fig. 40). Where the decidua vera is not compressed, as at the areas where decidua vera, reflexa, and serotina join (Fig. 39), the decidua retains in its deeper layer the typical character of the spongiosa, evidencing numerous glands of all sizes and lined by preserved epithelium of a "syncytial" character (Fig. 14b).


Fig. 40. — High-power drawing of decidua vera (compressed) of Fig. 39.


The decidua serotina evidences in the deeper layers few flattened glands. The superficial layers are greatly changed. Where the villi come in contact with decidua the syncytium disappears and the cell groups enter the maternal tissue and mingle with it (Fig. 41). This process is carried on, then, by all the attached villi also, so that the resulting "decidua" is of the same character as the cell groups. This resulting tissue resembles the decidua, but its nuclei take a deeper stain and it evidences no small-celled infiltration. In it are found cells composed of a structureless mass enclosing one or more cell nuclei or groups of nuclei. They resemble syncytium and are simply changed fetal cells. Without the aid of these syncytial cells, which infiltrate the maternal tissue very thoroughly and in all directions and quite deeply, it is difficult, with the exception of the darker staining, to mention characteristics which to the beginner would differentiate fetal cells from the decidua. It is this fact which has made the various questions depending on this differentiation difficult of solution.


Fig. 41. — Cell groups of villi entering maternal tissue. Taken from the serotinal or placental area of Fig. 39.


Fig. 42. — Dark syncytial cells infiltrating decidua serotina of Fig. 39.


The boundary between fetal and decidua cells shows degenerative changes; the superficial glands are pushed aside and destroyed, while the deeper glands grow, their epithelium swells, unites and forms so-called syncytial changes. These masses fall off and finally degenerate. The fetal cells at all periods infiltrate the decidua and bring it to destruction. The advancing ectoblastic and syncytial cells have an erosive action on the vessels which prepares them and the capillaries for bursting. In this way new lacunas and areas of degeneration result, and the blood from these open vessels changes the fetal cells to syncytium and to villi and constantly increases the extent of the intervillous space.

The cell groups of the villi later diminish and disappear. The villi increase in number and are closely grouped. Their stroma consists of star-shaped cells, between which are cells resembling those of Langhans. The rest of the stroma is filled out with numerous capillaries, and finally the syncytium is reduced to a thin substance containing nuclei (Fig. 44).




Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
Uterine and Tubal Gestation (1903): Part I. The Essentials of Uterine Gestation I. The Processes Antedating Uterine Gestation | II. The Embedding of the Ovum in the Guinea-Pig | III. The Embedding of the Human Ovum | IV. The Early Development of the Human Ovum | V. The Trophoblast in the Ova of Animals | VI. The Trophoblast of the Human Ovum | VII. The Further Development of the Human Ovum | VIII. The Chorionic Villi | IX. The Membrana Chorii | X. The Blood-Forming Function of the Trophoblast | XI. The Further Development of the Uterine Placenta | XII. The Placenta | XIII. The Umbilical Vessels and Cord | XIV. Gross Anatomy of the Placenta Part II. The Essentials of Tubal Gestation I. Processes Antedating Gestation in the Tube | II. Varying Views Concerning the Histology of Tubal Gestation | III. Embedding of the Ovum and the Development of Extra-Embryonal structures | Part III. Ovarian and Placental Secretion


Reference: Bandler SW. Uterine and tubal gestation. (1903) William Wood & Company, New York.


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2020, August 8) Embryology Book - Uterine and tubal gestation (1903) 1-11. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_Uterine_and_tubal_gestation_(1903)_1-11

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