Talk:Terminologia Embryologica

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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, November 19) Embryology Terminologia Embryologica. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Talk:Terminologia_Embryologica

2019

1. FIPAT. 2013. Terminologia Embryologica. Stuttgart: Thieme.

2. Carey JC. 2009. Editorial comment: Editor’s foreword to a special issue ‘Elements of Morphology: Standard terminology’. Am J Med Genet Part A 149A:1

3. Allanson JE, Biesecker LG, Carey JC, Hennekam RCM. 2009. Elements of morphology: Introduction. Am J Med Genet Part A 149A:2-5.

5. Hall BD, Graham JM Jr., Cassidy SB, Opitz JM. 2009. Elements of morphology: Standard terminology for the periorbital region. Am J Med Genet Part A 149A:29-39.

6. Hunter A, Frias J, Gillessen-Kaesbach G, Hughes H, Jones K, Wilson L. 2009. Elements of morphology: Standard terminology for the ear. Am J Med Genet Part A 149A:40-60.

8. Carey JC, Cohen MM Jr., Curry CJR, Devriendt K, Holmes LB, Verloes A. 2009. Elements of morphology: Standard terminology for the lips, mouth and oral region. Am J Med Genet Part A 147A:77-92.

9. Biesecker LG, Aase JM, Clericuzio C, Gurrieri F, Temple IK, Toriello H. 2009. Elements of morphology: Standard terminology for the hands and feet. Am J Med Genet Part A 147A:93-127.

10. Reardon W. 2015. The Bedside Dysmorphologist, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press.

11. Gripp KW, Slavotinek AM, Hall JG, Allanson JE. 2007. Handbook of Physical Measurements. 2nd ed. Oxford University Press.


2018

The Terminologia Histologica after 10years: Inconsistencies, mistakes, and new proposals

Ann Anat. 2018 Sep;219:65-75. doi: 10.1016/j.aanat.2018.05.005. Epub 2018 Jun 6.

Varga I1, Blankova A2, Konarik M2, Baca V3, Dvorakova V4, Musil V5. Author information Abstract This article details our experience with the Terminologia Histologica (TH) and its utility in the teaching of histology, cytology, and clinical medicine (e.g., pathology and hematology). Latin histological nomenclature has been used for 43years, and the latest version of the TH has been in use for 15years (although it was only issued publicly within the past 10years). The following findings and ensuing proposals allow us to discuss key points pertaining to the TH and make important suggestions for potential changes to the TH (such as the exclusion and inclusion of various terms). We classify these changes into six groups: 1.) mistakes in the TH, 2.) discrepancies among various Terminologiae, 3.) discrepancies within the TH, 4.) the repetition of terms, 5.) synonyms in the TH, and 6.) missing terms in the TH. Surprisingly, unlike the anatomical nomenclature, the histological nomenclature has been neglected in the literature. This article addresses this problem by reviewing and summarizing the state of this field, pointing out key discrepancies, offering solutions, and highlighting topics for further discussion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved. KEYWORDS: Histological nomenclature; Histological terminology; Histology; Nomenclature; Terminologia Histologica; Terminology PMID: 29885444 DOI: 10.1016/j.aanat.2018.05.005

2017

Towards a Terminologia Neuroanatomica

Clin Anat. 2017 Mar;30(2):145-155. doi: 10.1002/ca.22809. Epub 2016 Dec 2.

Ten Donkelaar HJ1, Broman J2, Neumann PE3, Puelles L4, Riva A5, Tubbs RS6, Kachlik D7.

Abstract

This article deals with a recent revision of the terminology of the Sections Central Nervous System (CNS; Systema nervosum centrale) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS; Systema nervosum periphericum) of the Terminologia Anatomica (TA, 1998) and the Terminologia Histologica (TH, 2008). These sections were extensively updated by the Federative International Programme for Anatomical Terminology (FIPAT) Working Group Neuroanatomy of the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists (IFAA). After extensive discussions by FIPAT, and consultation with the IFAA Member Societies, these parts were merged to form a Terminologia Neuroanatomica (TNA). After validation at the IFAA Executive Meeting, September 22, 2016, the TNA has been placed on the open part of the FIPAT website (http://FIPAT.library.dal.ca) as the official FIPAT Terminology. This article outlines the major differences between the TNA and the TA. Clin. Anat. 30:145-155, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. KEYWORDS: anatomy; embryology; neuroanatomy; terminology PMID: 27910135 DOI: 10.1002/ca.22809


2013

Am J Med Genet A. 2013 Jun;161A(6):1238-63. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.35934. Epub 2013 May 6. Elements of morphology: standard terminology for the external genitalia. Hennekam RC1, Allanson JE, Biesecker LG, Carey JC, Opitz JM, Vilain E. Author information Abstract An international group of clinicians working in the field of dysmorphology has initiated the standardization of terms used to describe human morphology. The goals are to standardize these terms and reach consensus regarding their definitions. In this way, we will increase the utility of descriptions of the human phenotype and facilitate reliable comparisons of findings among patients. Discussions with other workers in dysmorphology and related fields, such as developmental biology and molecular genetics, will become more precise. Here we introduce the anatomy of the male and female genitalia, and define and illustrate the terms that describe the major characteristics of these body regions. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID: 23650202 PMCID: PMC4440541 DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.a.35934


2009

Elements of morphology: introduction

Am J Med Genet A. 2009 Jan;149A(1):2-5. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32601.

Allanson JE1, Biesecker LG, Carey JC, Hennekam RC.

Abstract

An international group of clinicians working in the field of dysmorphology has initiated the standardization of terms used to describe human morphology. The goals are to standardize these terms and reach consensus regarding their definitions. In this way, we will increase the utility of descriptions of the human phenotype and facilitate reliable comparisons of findings among patients. Discussions with other workers in dysmorphology and related fields, such as developmental biology and molecular genetics, will become more precise. Here we describe the general background of the project and the various issues we have tried to take into account in defining the terms. PMID: 19127575 PMCID: PMC2774524 DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32601

Elements of morphology: standard terminology for the head and face

Am J Med Genet A. 2009 Jan;149A(1):6-28. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32612.

Allanson JE1, Cunniff C, Hoyme HE, McGaughran J, Muenke M, Neri G. Author information Abstract An international group of clinicians working in the field of dysmorphology has initiated the standardization of terms used to describe human morphology. The goals are to standardize these terms and reach consensus regarding their definitions. In this way, we will increase the utility of descriptions of the human phenotype and facilitate reliable comparisons of findings among patients. Discussions with other workers in dysmorphology and related fields, such as developmental biology and molecular genetics, will become more precise. Here we introduce the anatomy of the craniofacies and define and illustrate the terms that describe the major characteristics of the cranium and face. PMID: 19125436 PMCID: PMC2778021 DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32612

Elements of morphology: standard terminology for the lips, mouth, and oral region

Am J Med Genet A. 2009 Jan;149A(1):77-92. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32602.

Carey JC1, Cohen MM Jr, Curry CJ, Devriendt K, Holmes LB, Verloes A. Author information Abstract An international group of clinicians and scientists working in the field of dysmorphology has initiated the standardization of terms used to describe human morphology. The goals are to standardize these terms and reach consensus regarding their definitions. In this way, we will increase the utility of descriptions of the human phenotype and facilitate reliable comparisons of findings among patients. Discussions with other workers in dysmorphology and related fields, such as developmental biology and molecular genetics, will become more precise. Here we summarize the anatomy of the oral region and define and illustrate the terms that describe the major characteristics of the lips and mouth. PMID: 19125428 DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32602

Elements of morphology: standard terminology for the nose and philtrum

Am J Med Genet A. 2009 Jan;149A(1):61-76. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32600.

Hennekam RC1, Cormier-Daire V, Hall JG, Méhes K, Patton M, Stevenson RE. Author information Abstract An international group of clinicians working in the field of dysmorphology has initiated the standardization of terms used to describe human morphology. The goals are to standardize these terms and reach consensus regarding their definitions. In this way, we will increase the utility of descriptions of the human phenotype and facilitate reliable comparisons of findings among patients. Discussions with other workers in dysmorphology and related fields, such as developmental biology and molecular genetics, will become more precise. Here we introduce the anatomy of the nose and philtrum, and define and illustrate the terms that describe the major characteristics of these body regions. PMID: 19152422 DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32600