Book - An Introduction to the Study of Embryology

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Haddon An Introduction to the Study of Embryology. (1887) P. Blakiston, Son & Co., Philadelphia.
Haddon 1887: Chapter I. Maturation and Fertilisation of Ovum | Chapter II. Segmentation and Gastrulation | Chapter III. Formation of Mesoblast | Chapter IV. General Formation of the Body and Appendages | Chapter V. Organs from Epiblast | Chapter VI Organs from Hypoblast | Chapter VII. Organs from Mesoblast | Chapter VIII. General Considerations | Appendix A | Appendix B

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This historic 1887 embryology textbook by Haddon was designed as an introduction to the topic. Currently only the text has been made available online, figures will be added at a later date. My thanks to the Internet Archive for making the original scanned book available.
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Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

An Introduction to the Study of Embryology

By

Alfred C. Haddon, M.A. (Cantab.), M.R.I.A.

Professor Of Zoology In The Royal College Of Science, Dublin.


Philadelphia : P. Blakiston, Son & Co., 1012 Walnut Street. 1887.

To the memory of

his beloved master and friend,

Francis Maitland Balfour


This Book is dedicated by the Author.

Francis Balfour (1851-1882)
Francis Balfour (1851-1882)


Preface

Although there are at the present time, in addition to the special accounts in various text-books of Human and Comparative Anatomy, two Students - Manuals in the English language solely devoted to the study of Embryology, it has appeared to me that a relatively small work, giving a general review of the subject, might prove of use to students.

A knowledge of the main facts of Comparative Anatomy and Systematic Zoology has been assumed for the reader, the book being especially designed for Medical Students, or for those who already possess a general acquaintance with the Animal Kingdom.

It will be noticed that many of the more difficult problems of Ontology and Phylogeny and special modes of development have either been merely alluded to or entirely ignored - as, for instance, the segmentation of the ovum and the formation of the germinal layers in Insecta and Teleostei. This has been of set purpose, as my main object in writing this book has been to give a brief connected account of the principal organs, omitting or barely mentioning structures and phenomena, which may be regarded as of secondary importance.

The facts of development have been largely supplemented by hypotheses; and an endeavour has been made so to present the latter, that the student could not mistake them for the former.

It is inevitable that, in compiling such an introductory textbook as this, many subjects must be treated in a manner similar to that in which they have been dealt with by previous authors ; and therefore I have not hesitated to borrow from them when occasion required.

In order to facilitate references, very recent, important, or doubtful observations have been associated in many cases with the investigator -s name. It must be distinctly understood that I do not necessarily personally adopt statements or views which have been incorporated in the book; they are merely put forward for what they are worth.

The beginner is advised to pay attention only to the large type in the first reading, as purely theoretical subjects or matters of detail are printed in the smaller type. Most of the figures have been so drawn as to admit of their being coloured ; and the student is recommended to tint each germinal layer and the organs derived from it in a uniform manner throughout the book : thus the epiblast and its derivatives might be coloured pink, and the hypoblast tinted blue. A uniform system of colouration will be found to be of great assistance to the memory.

The sources from which the figures have been taken are in all cases acknowledged, and in the cases where no source is given the illustrations are original. Figs. 40, 41, 44, 45, 80, 81, and 178* have appeared previously in the Proceedings of the Eoyal Dublin Society.

The classification adopted will be found in an Appendix. All the genera mentioned in the text have been inserted, in order that their systematic position may be seen at a glance.


A Bibliography has also been appended, which is designed to serve simply as a guide to the more recent literature, and no attempt has been made to render the list exhaustive. It will be noticed that most of the Memoirs cited are of later date than the year 1880. The more important earlier papers are recorded in the late Professor Balfour -s “Treatise of Comparative Embryology.- As any student who seriously studies Embryology must consult that invaluable work, I have considered it superfluous to repeat the Bibliography given by Balfour. The prevalent custom of authors of giving references to the literature of the subject under discussion renders it comparatively easy to discover what has already been written thereon.

Finally, I would here express my warmest thanks to my friend Professor G. B. Howes, of the Normal School of Science, South Kensington, for his kindness in reading the proofs and in making many valuable suggestions.

Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Haddon 1887: Chapter I. Maturation and Fertilisation of Ovum | Chapter II. Segmentation and Gastrulation | Chapter III. Formation of Mesoblast | Chapter IV. General Formation of the Body and Appendages | Chapter V. Organs from Epiblast | Chapter VI Organs from Hypoblast | Chapter VII. Organs from Mesoblast | Chapter VIII. General Considerations | Appendix A | Appendix B


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, September 18) Embryology Book - An Introduction to the Study of Embryology. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_An_Introduction_to_the_Study_of_Embryology

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