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Human Placenta Potential Imprinted Genes

Villous trophoblasts of the human placenta grow as a branched structure, maximising exchange with maternal blood. Extravillous trophoblast invade into the maternal endometrium, and some cells colonise maternal spiral arteries, expanding them to maximise blood flow. ♂ = Paternally expressed; ♀ = maternally expressed.


Imprinted genes are important during fetal growth. Some, such as GNAS, UBE3A, and PLAGL, have physiological impact on the fetus only. Other genes may influence growth in utero via the placenta, or the fetus and placenta. The IUGR seen in SRS, and overgrowth in BWS are suggestive of a role of IGF2 in the human placenta.


Links: Molecular Development - Epigenetics | Placenta Development

Reference

Frost JM & Moore GE. (2010). The importance of imprinting in the human placenta. PLoS Genet. , 6, e1001015. PMID: 20617174 DOI.

Copyright

© 2010 Frost, Moore. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Citation: Frost JM, Moore GE (2010) The Importance of Imprinting in the Human Placenta. PLoS Genet 6(7): e1001015. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1001015


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http://www.plosgenetics.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pgen.1001015


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2024, June 21) Embryology Placenta potential imprinted genes.png. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/File:Placenta_potential_imprinted_genes.png

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File history

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current08:45, 6 August 2010Thumbnail for version as of 08:45, 6 August 2010600 × 452 (416 KB)S8600021 (talk | contribs)Figure 1. The human fetus and placenta. Villous trophoblasts of the human placenta grow as a branched structure, maximising exchange with maternal blood. Extravillous trophoblast invade into the maternal endometrium, and some cells colonise maternal spir