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From Embryology

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Fig. 1013. The Mouth Cavity

The apex of the tongue is turned upward, and on the right side a superficial dissection of its under surface has been made.

The tongue (lingua) is the principal organ of the sense of taste, and an important organ of speech; it also assists in the mastication and deglutition of the food. It is situated in the floor of the mouth, within the curve of the body of the mandible.

The tongue inferior surface (facies inferior linguæ under surface) (Fig. 1013) is connected with the mandible by the Genioglossi; the mucous membrane is reflected from it to the lingual surface of the gum and on to the floor of the mouth, where, in the middle line, it is elevated into a distinct vertical fold, the frenulum linguæ. On either side lateral to the frenulum is a slight fold of the mucous membrane, the plica fimbriata, the free edge of which occasionally exhibits a series of fringe-like processes. The apex of the tongue, part of the inferior surface, the sides, and dorsum are free.

Glands of the Tongue

  • Mucous glands are similar in structure to the labial and buccal glands. They are found especially at the back part behind the vallate papillæ, but are also present at the apex and marginal parts. In this connection the anterior lingual glands (Blandin or Nuhn) require special notice. They are situated on the under surface of the apex of the tongue (Fig. 1013), one on either side of the frenulum, where they are covered by a fasciculus of muscular fibers derived from the Styloglossus and Longitudinalis inferior. They are from 12 to 25 mm. long, and about 8 mm. broad, and each opens by three or four ducts on the under surface of the apex.
  • Serous glands occur only at the back of the tongue in the neighborhood of the taste-buds, their ducts opening for the most part into the fossæ of the vallate papillæ. These glands are racemose (clustered), the duct of each branching into several minute ducts, which end in alveoli, lined by a single layer of more or less columnar epithelium. Their secretion is of a watery nature, and probably assists in the distribution of the substance to be tasted over the taste area. (Ebner.)


Links: Tongue Development | Salivary Gland Development | Head Development | Musculoskeletal System Development |



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Reference

Gray H. Anatomy of the human body. (1918) Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2024, June 17) Embryology Gray1013.jpg. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/File:Gray1013.jpg

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current08:00, 11 May 2014Thumbnail for version as of 08:00, 11 May 2014562 × 500 (56 KB)Z8600021 (talk | contribs) ==Fig. 1013. The mouth cavity== The apex of the tongue is turned upward, and on the right side a superficial dissection of its under surface has been made. The tongue inferior surface (facies inferior linguæ under surface) (Fig. 1013) is connecte...

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