Talk:Cardiovascular System - Transposition of the Great Vessels

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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, February 22) Embryology Cardiovascular System - Transposition of the Great Vessels. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Talk:Cardiovascular_System_-_Transposition_of_the_Great_Vessels

2018

Contemporary management and outcomes in congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries

Kutty S, Danford DA, Diller GP & Tutarel O. (2018). Contemporary management and outcomes in congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries. Heart , 104, 1148-1155. PMID: 29326110 DOI.

Kutty S#1, Danford DA#1, Diller GP2, Tutarel O3. Author information Abstract Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) can occur in isolation, or in combination with other structural cardiac anomalies, most commonly ventricular septal defect, pulmonary stenosis and tricuspid valve disease. Clinical recognition can be challenging, so echocardiography is often the means by which definitive diagnosis is made. The tricuspid valve and right ventricle are on the systemic arterial side of the ccTGA circulation, and are therefore subject to progressive functional deterioration. The natural history of ccTGA is also greatly influenced by the nature and severity of accompanying lesions, some of which require surgical repair. Some management strategies leave the right ventricle as the systemic arterial pump, but carry the risk of worsening heart failure. More complex 'double switch' repairs establish the left ventricle as the systemic pump, and include an atrial baffle to redirect venous return in combination with either arterial switch or Rastelli operation (if a suitable ventricular septal defect permits). Occasionally, the anatomic peculiarities of ccTGA do not allow straightforward biventricular repair, and Fontan palliation is a reasonable option. Regardless of the approach selected, late cardiovascular complications are relatively common, so ongoing outpatient surveillance should be established in an age-appropriate facility with expertise in congenital heart disease care. KEYWORDS: cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging; complex congenital heart disease; congenital heart disease surgery; echocardiography; heart failure

Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Therapy in Adults with Transposition of the Great Vessels

Sugiura T, Kurihara C, Kawabori M, Critsinelis AC, Civitello AB, Morgan JA & Frazier OH. (2018). Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Therapy in Adults with Transposition of the Great Vessels. Ann Thorac Cardiovasc Surg , , . PMID: 30101823 DOI.

Sugiura T1,2, Kurihara C1,2,3, Kawabori M1,2, Critsinelis AC1,2, Civitello AB1,2, Morgan JA1,2, Frazier OH1,2. Author information Abstract An increasing number of children with congenital heart disease are surviving into adulthood and subsequently developing end-stage heart failure. Two example populations are adults who have been previously operated on for congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) and transposition of the great arteries (TGA). Implantation of a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) in these patients can present unusual anatomical and physiologic challenges. In this report, we describe outcomes of CF-LVAD implantation in three such patients. These cases demonstrate the feasibility of implanting a CF-LVAD in patients who have undergone surgery for CCTGA and/or TGA. KEYWORDS: congenital heart disease; heart failure; mechanical circulatory support PMID: 30101823 DOI: 10.5761/atcs.cr.18-00021

2014

Transposition of great arteries and partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage

Asian Cardiovasc Thorac Ann. 2013 Dec;21(6):713-6. doi: 10.1177/0218492312463217. Epub 2013 Jul 9.

Talwar S1, Rajashekar P, Reddy VA, Choudhary SK, Airan B. Author information

Abstract We describe the technical aspects of performing an atrial switch operation in a 4-year-old boy with d-transposition of the great arteries and partial anomalous drainage of the left-sided pulmonary veins. The rarity of the condition is discussed. KEYWORDS: Heart defects, atrial, congenital, heart septal defects, pulmonary circulation, pulmonary veins, transposition of great vessels

PMID 24569331

2010

MRI of surgical repair of transposition of the great vessels

AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2010 Jan;194(1):250-60. Cohen MD, Johnson T, Ramrakhiani S. Source Department of Radiology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University School of Medicine, 702 Barnhill Dr., Rm. 1053, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. mecohen@iupui.edu

Abstract OBJECTIVE: Our objectives are to review the surgical procedures that have been performed for the treatment of transposition of the great vessels. Using MRI, we illustrate the normal postoperative findings and many of the long-term complications for each of the surgical procedures.

CONCLUSION: MRI is an extremely useful imaging method for evaluation of normal and abnormal findings after surgical repair of transposition of the aorta and pulmonary artery.

PMID 20028930

2009

Arterial switch for transposition of the great vessels and Taussig-Bing anomaly after six months of age

Ann Thorac Surg. 2009 Dec;88(6):1948-51.

Feng B, Liu Y, Hu S, Shen X, Wang X, Wang H, Ming B. Source Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The Second of Chuanbei Clinical Medical College, Nanchong, People's Republic of China. fsn9977@yahoo.com.cn Abstract BACKGROUND: Indications and outcomes of the arterial switch operation in children who are older than 1 month of age and have transposition of the great arteries plus ventricular septal defect or Taussig-Bing anomaly were studied. METHODS: Arterial switch operation was performed in 68 children between January 2000 and December 2008. Thirty infants (1 to 6 months old) had transposition of the great arteries plus ventricular septal defect or Taussig-Bing anomaly (group A), and 38 children older than 6 months of age had transposition of the great arteries plus ventricular septal defect or Taussig-Bing anomaly (group B). The preoperative pulmonary artery pressure in group B was significantly higher than that in group A (46.5 +/- 16.3 mm Hg and 31.3 +/- 8.6 mm Hg, respectively; p < 0.05). Arterial switch operation was performed under general anesthesia, hypothermia (18 degrees to 22 degrees C), and low-flow (50 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) extracorporeal bypass circulation. Concomitant cardiac anomalies were treated during the same surgical session. RESULTS: Average extracorporeal circulation time, aortic clamping time, postoperative overall hospitalization, and intensive care unit duration were not significantly different between the two groups (p > 0.05). The operative mortality rate in group A was 10.0% (3 of 30 patients) and in group B, 7.9% (3 of 38 patients; p > 0.05). Follow-up examinations in the surviving 62 patients after a mean of 13.5 +/- 7.9 months (range, 0.5 to 56 months) showed significantly improved cardiac function without any long-term complications, and no cases of death occurred during this period. CONCLUSIONS: Arterial switch operation shows satisfactory operative outcome of transposition of the great arteries plus ventricular septal defect or Taussig-Bing anomaly in children older than the age of 6 months with moderate-to-severe pulmonary hypertension.

PMID 19932267

2004

An isolated single coronary artery supplying the entire myocardium in a patient with congenitally corrected transposition of the great vessels

Heart. 2004 Dec;90(12):1410.

Guven H, Billadello J, Beardslee M. Source guven_hasan@hotmail.com

PMID 15547014

1863

A Case of Transposition of the Great Vessels of the Heart

Med Chir Trans. 1863;46:193-210.3.

Cockle J.

PMID 20896216

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2147784

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2147784/pdf/medcht00035-0246.pdf