Book - An Atlas of Topographical Anatomy 21

From Embryology

XXI. Transverse section of the left thigh below the middle third and through the middle

Fig. 1. Transverse section of the left thigh, just below the middle third, from the same body. Fig. 2. Transverse section of the left thigh through the middle, from the same body


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Braune W. An atlas of topographical anatomy after plane sections of frozen bodies. (1877) Trans. by Edward Bellamy. Philadelphia: Lindsay and Blakiston.

Plates: 1. Male - Sagittal body | 2. Female - Sagittal body | 3. Obliquely transverse head | 4. Transverse internal ear | 5. Transverse head | 6. Transverse neck | 7. Transverse neck and shoulders | 8. Transverse level first dorsal vertebra | 9. Transverse thorax level of third dorsal vertebra | 10. Transverse level aortic arch and fourth dorsal vertebra | 11. Transverse level of the bulbus aortae and sixth dorsal vertebra | 12. Transverse level of mitral valve and eighth dorsal vertebra | 13. Transverse level of heart apex and ninth dorsal vertebra | 14. Transverse liver stomach spleen at level of eleventh dorsal vertebra | 15. Transverse pancreas and kidneys at level of L1 vertebra | 16. Transverse through transverse colon at level of intervertebral space between L3 L4 vertebra | 17. Transverse pelvis at level of head of thigh bone | 18. Transverse male pelvis | 19. knee and right foot | 20. Transverse thigh | 21. Transverse left thigh | 22. Transverse lower left thigh and knee | 23. Transverse upper and middle left leg | 24. Transverse lower left leg | 25. Male - Frontal thorax | 26. Elbow-joint hand and third finger | 27. Transverse left arm | 28. Transverse left fore-arm | 29. Sagittal female pregnancy | 30. Sagittal female pregnancy | 31. Sagittal female at term
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Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)


FIG. 1 of this plate is a section of the thigh taken somewhat below the upper third, about 2'5 inches below the section shown in the preceding plate, and three inches below the trochanter minor.


The individual portions of the quadriceps extensor are clearly seen separated from each other by fascia. At the posterior border of the vastus externus, which is covered by the strong dense fascial tendon of the tensor vaginas femoris, is the termination of the gluteus maximus. This muscle is attached by means of a strong tendinous mass to the thigh bone, and here separates the flexor muscles from the extensors.


Of the flexors which accompany the ischiatic nerve the biceps and semitendinosus are now completely separate.


The semimembranosus has already become muscular. Over it lie the three adductors first, the adductor magnus ; upon it the adductor brevis ; and between this and the adductor longus the profunda artery and obturator nerve.


On the other side of the adductor longus, between it and the vastus internus, is the space for the femoral artery and vein. The sheath of the vessel is clearly seen ; its formation by fascial laminae ; and its closing-in by the sartorius, which continually approaches the inner side of the thigh. This muscle reaches the gracilis, to which it is very similar in form, getting closer and closer to it until at last the two muscles accompany each other.


Fig. 2 represents a section through the middle of the thigh, where the sartorius and gracilis meet, and the short head of the biceps begins to take the place of the gluteus in the external intermuscular ligament, between the vastus externus and the flexors. External to the rectus femoris the individual portions of the quadriceps are not seen any more, the rectus with its central tendon being completely isolated by fascia.


The femoral artery, Avhich begins to lie considerably more laterally with regard to the bone, is still in the same fascial sheath, between the adductor longus and vastus internus, and covered by the sartorius. The adductor longus has already lost its bulk ; and the adductor brevis has disappeared at this level entirely.


The profunda artery is divided at the point where it perforates the adductor magnus close to the bone.


The three flexor muscles are completely isolated from each other, and lie so close together posteriorly that the great sciatic nerve takes a position in a furrow between the long head of the biceps and the semi-tendinosus.


With reference to this plate, it may be added that the thigh was rotated somewhat outwards before the section was made.


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
Braune Plates (1877): 1. Male - Sagittal body | 2. Female - Sagittal body | 3. Obliquely transverse head | 4. Transverse internal ear | 5. Transverse head | 6. Transverse neck | 7. Transverse neck and shoulders | 8. Transverse level first dorsal vertebra | 9. Transverse thorax level of third dorsal vertebra | 10. Transverse level aortic arch and fourth dorsal vertebra | 11. Transverse level of the bulbus aortae and sixth dorsal vertebra | 12. Transverse level of mitral valve and eighth dorsal vertebra | 13. Transverse level of heart apex and ninth dorsal vertebra | 14. Transverse liver stomach spleen at level of eleventh dorsal vertebra | 15. Transverse pancreas and kidneys at level of L1 vertebra | 16. Transverse through transverse colon at level of intervertebral space between L3 L4 vertebra | 17. Transverse pelvis at level of head of thigh bone | 18. Transverse male pelvis | 19. knee and right foot | 20. Transverse thigh | 21. Transverse left thigh | 22. Transverse lower left thigh and knee | 23. Transverse upper and middle left leg | 24. Transverse lower left leg | 25. Male - Frontal thorax | 26. Elbow-joint hand and third finger | 27. Transverse left arm | 28. Transverse left fore-arm | 29. Sagittal female pregnancy | 30. Sagittal female pregnancy | 31. Sagittal female at term

Reference

Braune W. An atlas of topographical anatomy after plane sections of frozen bodies. (1877) Trans. by Edward Bellamy. Philadelphia: Lindsay and Blakiston.


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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, December 13) Embryology Book - An Atlas of Topographical Anatomy 21. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_An_Atlas_of_Topographical_Anatomy_21

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© Dr Mark Hill 2019, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G