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Steroid hormone receptor signaling

Steroid Hormone Receptors (SHR) act as hormone dependent nuclear transcription factors.

Upon entering the cell by passive diffusion, the hormone (H) binds the receptor, which is subsequently released from heat shock proteins, and translocates to the nucleus.

There, the receptor dimerizes, binds specific sequences in the DNA, called Hormone Responsive Elements or HREs, and recruits a number of coregulators that facilitate gene transcription.

This latter step can be modulated by receptor antagonists like tamoxifen (T), and cellular signalling pathways.

Legend
  1. hormone binding
  2. chaperone interaction
  3. nuclear translocation
  4. receptor dimerization
  5. DNA binding
  6. putative membrane-bound receptors
  7. coregulator recruitment
  8. transcription
  9. proteasomal degradation
  10. modulation by cellular signalling pathways
  11. antagonist resistance


Links: Endocrine System Development

Reference

<pubmed>17464358</pubmed>| PMC1853070 | Nucl Recept Signal.


Copyright

© 2007, Griekspoor et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution License, which permits unrestricted non-commercial use distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Original file name: Figure 2 Big_nrs05003.f2.gif http://www.nursa.org/ejournal/published/05003/big_nrs05003.f2.gif

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current18:11, 5 October 2010Thumbnail for version as of 18:11, 5 October 2010800 × 835 (105 KB)S8600021 (talk | contribs)==Steroid hormone receptor signaling== Steroid Hormone Receptors (SHR) act as hormone dependent nuclear transcription factors. Upon entering the cell by passive diffusion, the hormone (H) binds the receptor, which is subsequently released from heat shock