File:Hertig1956 plate13.jpg

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Plate 13

Three abnormal implanted ova, one consisting of trophoblast only, one with trophoblast and a small chorionic cavity but no embryo and a third with trophoblast and embryo but no chorionic cavity. It is, perhaps, conceivable that abnormal morulae similar to those illustrated in figures 59-66 could have produced this sort of abnormal implantation but, in any event, this type of pregnancy is inevitably destined to abort. Clinical evidence of pregnancy in these patients would have been problematic, depending upon whether the trophoblast were of such quality as to influence the persistence of the corpus luteum.


67 An intact implantation site of an ovum of about 11 days which was grossly abnormal because of the flattening and radial wrinkling of its endometrial surface. Carnegie 8329, Sequence 2. X 22.

68 A mid-cross section of the ovum shown in figure 67. Note the absence of germ disc, chorionic. cavity and cytotrophoblast. Although syncytiotrophoblast is present, its lacunar development. is abnormal with evidence of circulation only in the equatorial region of the. ovum. The lack of cytotrophoblast and its asso» ciated chorionic gonadotropic. hormone probably would have resulted in early abortion. Carnegie 8329, Section 1342-3. X 100.

69 A polypoid hemorrhagic implantation site of an ovum of about 12 days of age. The type of implantation site is in itself abnormal although it gave no clue as to the fundamental nature of the ovular abnormality shown in figure 70. It is impossible to prove whether this gross appearance resulted from the ovum implanting on an endometrial polyp even though there were many other polyps present. Carnegie 7771, Sequence 1. X 1-1.

70 Section through the greatest diameter of the specimen shown in figure 69. Note prominence of surrounding endometrium (suggesting previous polyp), defective trophoblast with pathologically large lacunae and small chorionic, cavity. The latter contains no recognizable germ disc although there is a mesoblastic membrane faintly reminiscent of that of the cxocoelom. This ovum would undoubtedly have aborted and is an example of the commonest cause of spontaneous abortion — that due to lack of or early death of the embryo. Carnegie 7771, Section 34-]. X 100.

71 Implantation site from a pathologic ovum of about 9 days of age. Note irregular contour and flattened appearance with relatively large ulceration. Although this is not typical of a normal implantation site of a late previllous ovum, the type and degree of abnormality could not have been foretold. Carnegie 8370, Sequence 5. X 22.

72 High-power detail through germ disc and amniotic cavity of specimen seen in figure 73. Note close apposition of trophoblast to germ disc. Carnegie 8370, Section 6-3-5. X 300.

73 Section through largest diameter of specimen seen in figure 71. Although there is a germ disc and amniotic cavity (fig. 72), there is essentially no development of the chorionic cavity. This defect, together with the laminar rather than the circmnfcrential arrangement of syncytio- and cytotroplioblast, makes this a pathologic ovum. It is inconceivable that it could have developed much further although it is impossible to predict the precise type of pathologic abortns that would have been produced by this ovum. Carnegie 8370, Section 6-3-5. X 100.


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Reference

Hertig AT. Rock J. and Adams EC. A description of 34 human ova within the first 17 days of development. (1956) Amer. J Anat., 98:435-493.


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2024, May 24) Embryology Hertig1956 plate13.jpg. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/File:Hertig1956_plate13.jpg

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