File:Acetabular angle.jpg

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Acetabular Angle

The Acetabular angle (AC) arises from a horizontal line trough the triangular cartilage at the right and left pelvis and a second line connecting the corner of the triangular cartilage and the lateral acetabular rim. It is used clinically as the "acetabular index" to determine hip development and associated displasias.


Links: limb abnormalities

The text below is the abstract from the repeated article on limb splinting.[1]

  • Developmental dysplasia of the hip is a gradually progressing disorder reflecting anatomically different situations reaching from mild subluxation of the femoral head to full luxation of the hip. The disorder is caused by malformations of anatomic structures that have developed during the embryologic period. The pathology of developmental dislocation of the hip is associated with a loose hyperelastic capsule, elongated ligamentum teres and slight eversion of the hypertrophied acetabular rim. While the femoral head is normal in shape, excessive femoral and acetabular antetorsion may be present causing anatomic instability of the hip joint.
  • For treatment of Graf class IIb dysplastic hips at walking onset a treatment concept with abduction splints allowing patterns as walking and crawling under constant abduction control was investigated. However, as the splint still incapacitates child movements the research question remains whether the physiologically progressing maturation of hips can be significantly altered using such abduction splints for walking children.
  • Of 106 children showing late hip dysplasia, 68 children treated with the Hoffman-Daimler (HD-splint) abduction splint were compared with 38 children with neglect of the abduction treatment in this retrospective study. Radiographic analyses were performed measuring the development of the age dependent acetabular angle.
  • The regression analysis for splint treatment showed a significant linear regression for both splint treatment and no splint treatment group (r2 = 0.31 respectively r2 = 0.33). No statistical difference between both treatment groups was apparent.
  • Considering the characteristics of this study, there seems to be no strong rationale supporting the use of an abduction device in growing children. As no significant difference between treatment groups is apparent, a future controlled prospective study on splinting effects can be considered ethically allowed.

Reference

  1. Windhagen H, Thorey F, Kronewid H, Pressel T, Herold D & Stukenborg-Colsman C. (2005). The effect of functional splinting on mild dysplastic hips after walking onset. BMC Pediatr , 5, 17. PMID: 15958160 DOI.


Copyright

© 2005 Windhagen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Original file name: 1471-2431-5-17-2.jpg http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2431/5/17/figure/F2


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2024, June 23) Embryology Acetabular angle.jpg. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/File:Acetabular_angle.jpg

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© Dr Mark Hill 2024, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G

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current00:09, 29 September 2010Thumbnail for version as of 00:09, 29 September 2010600 × 433 (22 KB)S8600021 (talk | contribs)==Acetabular angle (AC – Hilgenreiner)== The AC- angle arises from a horizontal line trough the triangular cartilage at the right and left pelvis and a second line connecting the corner of the triangular cartilage and the lateral acetabular rim. Devel

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