Leonardo da Vinci - the anatomist (1930) Illustrations

From Embryology
Embryology - 4 Jul 2020    Facebook link Pinterest link Twitter link  Expand to Translate  
Google Translate - select your language from the list shown below (this will open a new external page)

العربية | català | 中文 | 中國傳統的 | français | Deutsche | עִברִית | हिंदी | bahasa Indonesia | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | မြန်မာ | Pilipino | Polskie | português | ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਦੇ | Română | русский | Español | Swahili | Svensk | ไทย | Türkçe | اردو | ייִדיש | Tiếng Việt    These external translations are automated and may not be accurate. (More? About Translations)

A personal message from Dr Mark Hill (May 2020)  
Mark Hill.jpg
I have decided to take early retirement in September 2020. During the many years online I have received wonderful feedback from many readers, researchers and students interested in human embryology. I especially thank my research collaborators and contributors to the site. The good news is Embryology will remain online and I will continue my association with UNSW Australia. I look forward to updating and including the many exciting new discoveries in Embryology!

McMurrich JP. Leonardo da Vinci - the anatomist. (1930) Carnegie institution of Washington, Williams & Wilkins Company, Baltimore.

   Leonardo da Vinci (1930): 1 Introductory | 2 Anatomy from Galen to Leonardo | 3 Possible Literary Sources of Leonardo’s Anatomical Knowledge | 4 Anatomical Illustration before Leonardo | 5 Fortunes and Friends | 6 Leonardo’s Manuscripts, their Reproduction and his Projected Book | 7 Leonardo’s Anatomical Methods | 8 General Anatomy and Physiology | 9 Leonardo’s Canon of Proportions | 10 The Skeleton | 11 The Muscles | 12 The Heart | 13 The Blood-vessels | 14 The Organs of Digestion | 15 The Organs of Respiration | 16 The Excretory and Reproductive Organs | 17 The Nervous System | 18 The Sense Organs | 19 Embryology | 20 Comparative Anatomy | 21 Botany | 22 Conclusion | References | Glossary of Terms | List of Illustrations
Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Leonardo da Vinci - The Anatomist

List of Illustrations

McMurrich1930 frontispiece.jpg

Portrait of Leonardo da Vinci, probably by himself. Royal Palace, Turin (Anderson) Frontispiece

Chapter II Anatomy from Galen to Leonardo

Chapter IV Anatomical Illustration before Leonardo

Chapter VII Leonardo’s Anatomical Methods

Chapter IX Leonardo’s Canon of Proportions

Chapter X The Skeleton

Chapter XI The Muscles

Fig. 30. The Muscle Man from the Raudnitz five-figure series (1399). From Sudhoff, Archiv, vol. 3, pi. 12, 1910

Fig. 31. The abdominal muscles from Pietro di Abano’s Conciliator differentiarum (1496). From Sudhoff, Archiv, vol. 3, pi. 2, 1910

Fig. 32. The muscles of the neck and shoulder. (AnA, 3v.)

Fig. 33. Two representations of the muscles of the back and shoulder. (AnA, 16.) 137

Fig. 34. A cord diagram of the muscles supposed to stabilize the cervical vertebra in movements of the head. Also a sketch showing the insertions of muscles into the spine of a vertebra. (QII, 5v.)

Fig. 35. Diagrammatic representation of the superior serratus posterior and the serratus anterior. (Q0, 8.)

Fig. 36. The muscles of the shoulder, trunk and leg. (AnA, 15v.)

Fig. 37. Figures showing the form of the diaphragm. (QI, 5.)

Fig. 38. The abdominal muscles. (QI, 5.)

Fig. 39. The scapular and brachial muscles. (AnA, 2.)

Fig. 40. The muscles of the arm and forearm. (AnA, 9v.)

Fig. 41. Dissections of the muscles, tendons and ligaments of the hand and fingers. (AnA, 19.)

Fig. 42. The muscles and tendons of the sole of the foot. (AnA, 11.)

Fig. 43. Diagram of the structure of the heart in Ioannes Adelphus’ edition of Mondino’s Anathomia (Strassburg, 1513). After C. Singer, Fasciculo di medicina, vol. 1, fig. 59, 1925

Chapter XII The Heart

Fig. 44. Two figures of the heart. (QII, 3v.)

Fig. 45. Dissection of the heart showing papillary muscles and a moderator band. (QII, 14.)

Fig. 46. The thoracic and abdominal viscera, the heart dissected and showing several moderator bands in each ventricle. (QIV, 7.)

Fig. 47. Sketches of the base of the heart and of the papillary muscles and chordae tendineae of the left ventricle. (QIV, 14.)

Fig. 48. The tricuspid valve from above and from below, showing the attachments of the chordae tendineae. (QII, 8v.)

Fig. 49. Studies of the vortices in the pockets of the semilunar valves. (QIV, 11.)

Fig. 50. Figures illustrating the comparison of the heart and bloodvessels with a sprouting nut with its plumule and radicle. In the figure to the right the azygos vein is well shown. (AnB, 11.)

Chapter XIII The Blood-Vessels

Fig. 51. The superficial veins of the arm and a sketch comparing the arteries of a centenarian with those of a child. (AnB, 10.)

Fig. 52. Early study of the heart and blood-vessels. (QV, 1.)

Fig. 53. Dissections of the heart, lungs, abdominal viscera and bloodvessels. (QIII, lOv.)

Fig. 54. The great vessels of a centenarian. (AnB, 33.)

Fig. 55. The superficial pectoral and epigastric veins. (AnA, 6.)

Fig. 56. Figures of the hepatic artery and portal vein. (AnB, 34v.)

Fig. 57. The iliac vein and its branches. (AnB, 6v.)

Fig. 58. The hypogastric vessels and the umbilical vein. Above is a frontal section through the cervical vertebrae showing the costotransverse foramina. (AnB, 4.)

Fig. 59. An early sketch of the digestive tract and longitudinal and transverse sections of the penis. (QIII, 3v.)

Fig. 60. Above a supposed arrangement of the intestine; below the stomach, liver and spleen with splenic vein; to the right the caecum and appendix. (AnB, 14v.)

Fig. 61. A second arrangement of the intestines. To the right suggestion as to the mode of entrance of the ureter into the bladder. (AnB, 14.)

Fig. 62. The lungs, diaphragm, liver, stomach and spleen of an animal. (AnB, 37 v.)

Fig. 63. The mesentery. (AnB, 3.)

Fig. 64. The great omentum with the hypogastric vessels and the umbilical vein. To the left the deep epigastric veins. (AnB, 22v.)

Fig. 65. Dissection of the neck, in which an animal’s larynx is represented as human. (QV, 16.)

Chapter XV The Organs of Respiration

Fig. 66. Various figures of the larynx and trachea. The surface modeling of the leg. (AnA, 3.)

Fig. 67. The heart and bronchi after maceration away of the lung parenchyma. To the right representations of the bronchi. (QII, 1.)

Fig. 68. Sketch of the lungs and heart, showing the pleural cavities. (QIV. 3.)

Chapter XVI The Excretory and Reproductive Organs

Chapter XVII The Nervous System

Chapter XVIII The Sense Organ

Chapter XIX Embryology

Chapter XX Comparative Anatomy


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
   Leonardo da Vinci (1930): 1 Introductory | 2 Anatomy from Galen to Leonardo | 3 Possible Literary Sources of Leonardo’s Anatomical Knowledge | 4 Anatomical Illustration before Leonardo | 5 Fortunes and Friends | 6 Leonardo’s Manuscripts, their Reproduction and his Projected Book | 7 Leonardo’s Anatomical Methods | 8 General Anatomy and Physiology | 9 Leonardo’s Canon of Proportions | 10 The Skeleton | 11 The Muscles | 12 The Heart | 13 The Blood-vessels | 14 The Organs of Digestion | 15 The Organs of Respiration | 16 The Excretory and Reproductive Organs | 17 The Nervous System | 18 The Sense Organs | 19 Embryology | 20 Comparative Anatomy | 21 Botany | 22 Conclusion | References | Glossary of Terms | List of Illustrations


Reference: McMurrich JP. Leonardo da Vinci - the anatomist. (1930) Carnegie institution of Washington, Williams & Wilkins Company, Baltimore.


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2020, July 4) Embryology Leonardo da Vinci - the anatomist (1930) Illustrations. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Leonardo_da_Vinci_-_the_anatomist_(1930)_Illustrations

What Links Here?
© Dr Mark Hill 2020, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G