Book - Vertebrate Embryology (1913)

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Jenkinson JW. Vertebrate Embryology. (1913) Oxford University Press, London.

Vertebrate Embryology 1913: 1 Introduction | 2 Growth | 3 The Germ-Cells, their Origin and Structure | 4 The Germ- Cells, their Maturation and Fertilization | 5 Segmentation | 6 The Germinal Layers | 7 The Early Stages in the Development of the Embryo | 8 The Foetal Membranes of the Mammalia | 9 The Placenta | Figures
Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Vertebrate Embryology

Comprising

The Early History Of The Embryo And Its Foetal Membranes

By

J. W. Jenkinson, M.A., D.Sc.

Lecturer In Embryology, Oxford

Fellow Of Exeter College


Oxford London:


Oxford University Press London Humphrey Milford Publisher to the University

Impression of 1925

First Edition, 1913

Jenkinson, John Wilfrid, (1871-1915)


TO A. A. W. HUBRECHT

PDF version

Preface

The publiccation in 1885 of Francis Balfour's great treatise on Comparative Embryology marked the first attempt to establish on a scientific basis our knowledge of the development of the animal organism.


Since Balfour's day embryology has travelled far, and a multitude of new discoveries has thrown fresh light on the structure, origin, maturation, and fertilization of the germ-cells, on the mechanism of segmentation, on the significance of the germinal layers, as well as on the later organogeny in the several groups.


But while abroad all this material has found embodiment in such comprehensive manuals as those of Oskar Hertwig on Vertebrate, and of Korschelt and Heider on Invertebrate Embryology, hardly any serious endeavour has so far been made in this country to review the fresh data or to revise or enlarge the general conclusions drawn by Balfour.


It is true, of course, that several admirable text-books of Vertebrate embryology have been issued, among which those of Milnes Marshall, of Minot in America, and of Bryce are particularly worthy of mention, but these are all directed primarily to the needs of the medical student and are consequently somewhat limited in their scope.


It would seem, therefore, that the hour is ripe for a re-statement of the facts and a renewed examination of the problems that they raise, and the object of the present work is to supply this want, if only for one group of animals, the Vertebrata.


The Vertebrates have, however, provided the material for so many investigations that much may be learnt of the general questions alluded to from them alone.

But modern research has by no means been restricted to the inquiry into the first stages of development.

Thanks very largely to the splendid labours of Hubrecht on the structure and development of the foetal membranes and placenta of the Mammals, a flood of light has been shed on much that was previously obscure in the early history of the human embryo.


The account of the general development of the embryo is therefore followed by a discussion of these embryonic organs, a discussion which I trust may be of genuine service to the medical man. No knowledge of human ontogeny can, however, be really sound which is not based upon and seen in the light of the broad facts of comparative embryology, and I hope that the earlier chapters will prove of value to the student of medicine as well as to the professed zoologist.


The detailed organogeny of the Vertebrates is outside my present aim, and must be reserved for a future volume.


The illustrations have been drawn especially for the book, with the exception of a few taken from my Experimental Embryology. Where the figure is a copy due acknowledgement is made.

At the end of each chapter a list will be found of the principal authorities cited ; the student who desires further information may consult the complete bibliography to be found in Oskar Hertwig's Handbuch der Entwicklungslehre der Wirbeltiere.


It is a pleasant duty to express my obligations to the Delegates of the Clarendon Press, in particular to Sir WilUam Osier, and to their Secretaries for the pains that have been expended m the production of this volume.

Contents

CHAPTER I Introduction

CHAPTER II Growth

CHAPTER III The Germ-Cells, their Origin and Structure

CHAPTER IV The Germ- Cells, their Maturation and Fertilization

CHAPTER V Segmentation

CHAPTER VI The Germinal Layers

CHAPTER VII The Early Stages in the Development of the Embryo

CHAPTER VIII The Foetal Membranes of the Mammalia

CHAPTER IX The Placenta


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Jenkinson JW. Vertebrate Embryology. (1913) Oxford University Press, London.

Vertebrate Embryology 1913: 1 Introduction | 2 Growth | 3 The Germ-Cells, their Origin and Structure | 4 The Germ- Cells, their Maturation and Fertilization | 5 Segmentation | 6 The Germinal Layers | 7 The Early Stages in the Development of the Embryo | 8 The Foetal Membranes of the Mammalia | 9 The Placenta | Figures

Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, October 16) Embryology Book - Vertebrate Embryology (1913). Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_Vertebrate_Embryology_(1913)

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