Book - Text-Book of Embryology 2 (1919)

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Kerr JG. Text-Book of Embryology II (1919) MacMillan and Co., London.

Textbook Chapters: 1 Formation of the Germ Layers | 2 Skin and Derivatives | 3 Alimentary Canal | 4 Coelomic Organs | 5 Skeleton | 6 Vascular | 7 Internal Body Features | 8 Adaptation to Environmental Conditions | 9 General Considerations | 10 Common Fowl | 11 Lower Vertebrates | Appendix

- Currently only early Draft Version of Text -

Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
Online Editor  
Mark Hill.jpg If like me you are interested in development, then these historic embryology textbooks are fascinating in the detail and interpretation of embryology at that given point in time.

Important Note - As with all historic texts, terminology and developmental descriptions may differ from our current understanding. There may also be errors in transcription or interpretation from the original text. Currently only the text and figures are available online, all figures will have legends added at a later date.

Note that there are within the online text, references to specific pages that are relevant only in the original hardcopy text.

Historic Embryology Textbooks

Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Text-Book of Embryology II

Vertebrate with the exception of Mammalia

John Graham Kerr
John Graham Kerr (1869 – 1957)

by

J. Graham Kerr

Preface

The object of this volume is to sketch in its main outlines the science of Vertebrate Embryology as disclosed by the study of the 11on-mammalian vertebrates. It is not meant as a work of reference as regards details. The facts of embryology are dealt with as illustrating general principles: large masses of data which have no particular bearing, in the present condition of knowledge, are deliberately omitted.


It is believed that a volume upon the lines indicated is greatly needed ~ not merely for students intending to specialize in vertebrate morphology but also for students of medicine who desire to know something of the framework of morphological principles which serves to unite together the detailed facts of anatomy. The science of embryology, in fact the science of animal morphology as a whole, has suffered much through the patient but undiscriminating accumulation of masses of mere descriptive detail which have tended to obscure general principles and incidentally to smother interest in one of the most fascinating of sciences. It is hoped that the student who reads through portions of this book will have at least his suspicions aroused that behind the dull facts of anatomical structure there lies a very charming and living philosophy.


It has again been one of the misfortunes of vertebrate embryology that its teaching has been dominated in great part by general ideas based upon insufficient data. In an evolutionary science like morphology the real fundamental principles are to be elicited by enquiry into the more archaic types of existing animal life. But the material for the earlier embryologieal investigations was chosen not for its archaicism but rather for purely practical reasons such as accessibility or case of investigation. It follows that at the present time when we have knowledge of the more archaic subdivisions of the vertebrata not accessible to the early builders of the science, it is necessary to regard the historical foundations of vertebrate embryology rather critically in the light of the fuller knowledge of to-day. In essaying the writing of this volume I have been fortunate in having at my disposal——for the first time in the history of embryology — devclopmental material of all three-genera of Dipnoi as well as of poly/pfe7'us-—in addition to the more accessible material of the other relatively archaic groups constituted by the Elasmobranchs, Actinopterygian Ganoids, and Uroclele Amphibians. This has rendered possible an all-round survey of the chief problems of vertebrate embryology which would otherwise have been quite impossible.


As already indicated 1 do not intend this volume as a work of reference on the details of vertebrate embryology: that role is fulfilled by the wonderful and indispensable ][6t7t(flb’llzG]t edited by O. Hertwig — of which incidentally I have made constant use and to which I must express my sincere aclcnowledgments. Nor do I attempt to give full historical accounts of the development of various parts of .the subject. The literature lists are merely guides to paint the way to the student who desires to extend his reading to original papers. The dates given in these lists are as a rule the dates given on the title-page of the complete volume, and are merely to facilitate finding the particular paper: they must not be taken as giving the actual date of publication of the individual memoir.


I have to express my grateful thanks to various friends. As regards the first three chapters I had the benefit of the wise counsel of Mr. Walter Heape, who unfortunately however found himself compelled by the exigencies of war work to withdraw from the Editor-ship.


Various chapters have benefited by the help and advice of my friend and colleague, Dr. W. E. Agar. The entire volume has been read in proof by Mr. James Chumley and Dr. Monica Taylor, to both of whom I am deeply indebted. To Dr. John Love and to Dr. Jane Robertson I am indebted for helpful criticism in regard to special sections of the book.

The illustrations which forin a marked feature of the volume I owe for the most part to the artistic skill, combined with high scientific accuracy, of Mr. Kirkpatrick Maxwell. Apart from the completely original figures it will be noticed that there are many which have been worked up from illustrations in original papers, but which are practically new figures. In all such cases, however, I have thought it only right to make due acknowledgment of the author of the original figure.


For permission to borrow particular text-book figures l have to thank Professor Frank R. Lillie, Mr. John Murray, Messrs. Masson & Cie, and Messrs. Macmillan. The present unfortunate circumstances of international strife call for a special acknowledgment of the generous way in which Professor Alf. Greil entrusted to me the originals of his valuable unpublished figures illustrating the development of the heart in the bird. They are reproduced on pages 384 and 385.


I have included the name of Charles Darwin in the dedication of this volume to emphasize the fact that Embryology is primarily a branch of synthetic evolutionary science. While the fashion of the day in evolutionary research favours rather experimental research into the phenomena of inheritance and more or less speculative enquiry into the ultimate mechanism of inheritance or into the possible causes of evolutionary ehange—-morphology, and more especially embryology, is steadily at work all the while, mapping out the paths along which the evolution of organisms and their con- stituent organs has taken place. Working away in comparative seclusion, unadvertised, and for the most part unnoticed, embryology is thus building up an important part of the framework of what will be the permanent edifice of evolutionary science.

J. GRAHAM KERR.

1919.

Contents

Chapter I Segmentation, Gastrulation, and the Formation of the Germ Layers

Chapter II The Skin And Its Derivatives

Chapter III The Alimentary Canal

Chapter IV The Coelomic Organs

Chapter V The Skeleton

Chapter VI Vascular System

Chapter VII The External Features of the Body

Chapter VIII Modifications of the Envelopes and other Adaptive Modifications Occurring During the Early Development of the Amphibia

Chapter IX Some of the General Considerations Relating to the Embryology of the Vertebrata

Chapter X The Practical Study of the Embryology Of The Common Fowl

Chapter XI Hints Regarding the Practical Study of the Embryology of the Various Types of Lower Vertebrates

Appendix - The General Methods of Embryological Research

INDEX


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

- Currently only Draft Version of Text -

Textbook Chapters: 1 Formation of the Germ Layers | 2 Skin and Derivatives | 3 Alimentary Canal | 4 Coelomic Organs | 5 Skeleton | 6 Vascular | 7 Internal Body Features | 8 Adaptation to Environmental Conditions | 9 General Considerations | 10 Common Fowl | 11 Lower Vertebrates | Appendix

Reference

Kerr JG. Text-Book of Embryology II (1919) MacMillan and Co., London.



Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, September 20) Embryology Book - Text-Book of Embryology 2 (1919). Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_Text-Book_of_Embryology_2_(1919)

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