Book - Human Embryology and Morphology (1921)

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Keith A. Human Embryology and Morphology. (1921) New York, Longmans, Green & Co. London: Edward Arnold.

Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
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Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
Human Embryology and Morphology

Human Embryology and Morphology

By

Arthur Keith

M.D., F.R.S., Ll.D. (Aberdeen), F.R.C.S. (Eng.)

Conservator Of The Museum And Hunterian Professor

Royal College Of Surgeons, England

Fdllerian Professor In Comparative Anatomy, Royal Institution, London


Fourth Edition, Revised And Enlarged Wite Nearly 500 Illustrations


New York, Longmans, Green & Co. London: Edward Arnold , 1921

All Rights Reserved

Contents

  1. Early Changes in the Development of the Ovum and Embryo
  2. The Manner in which a Connection is Established between the Foetus and Uterus
  3. The Primitive Streak, Notochord and Somites
  4. The Age Changes in the Embryo and Foetus
  5. The Spinal Column and Back
  6. The Segmentation of the Body
  7. Central Nervous System — Differentiation of the Spinal Cord
  8. The Mid- and Hind-Brains
  9. The Fore-Brain or Prosencephalon
  10. The Fore-Brain OR Prosencephalon (continued). Cerebral Vesicles
  11. The Cranium
  12. Development of the Face
  13. The Teeth and Apparatus of Mastication
  14. The Nasal Cavities and Olfactory Structures
  15. Development of the Structures concerned in the Sense OF Sight
  16. The Organ of Hearing
  17. Pharynx and Neck
  18. Tongue, Thyroid and Structures developed from the Walls of the Primitive Pharynx
  19. Organs of Digestion
  20. Circulatory System
  21. Circulatory System (continued)
  22. Respiratory System
  23. Urogenital System
  24. Urogenital System (Continued)
  25. Body Wall and Pelvic Floor
  26. Development and Differentiation of the Limb Buds
  27. Morphology of the Limbs
  28. Skin and its Appendages

Preface to Fourth Edition

Sir Arthur Keith (1866 - 1955)
Arthur Keith (1866 - 1955)

The issue of a new edition has given the author an opportunity not only of incorporating recent additions to our knowledge of the development and morphology of the human body, but also of- recasting many of the chapters. Over eighty new illustrations have been added. The chief alterations relate to sections dealing with the origin of the foetal membranes, the growth of the embryo and foetus, and the nature of the basal ganglia of the brain. The chapters dealing with the pharynx, the ear, the heart, and the lymphatic system have been rearranged and to a large extent rewritten. The enquiries of the late Professor Franklin P. Mall have shown that human embryos, in their earlier stages, are a week older than was formerly believed. The estimated ages of embryos now given in this work are based on Professor Mall's calculations.

Experience has confirmed the author in his earlier opinion that the facts of embryology are barren and meaningless until they are interpreted in the light of our knowledge of the evolution of the human body — a knowledge which must be founded on a comprehensive survey of comparative anatomy and physiology. Hence in this new edition the author has sought to give, not only a descriptive history of the development of the various systems of the body, but to make the facts intelligible by bringing a knowledge of comparative anatomy and evolution to bear on them.

Human Embryology and Comparative Anatomy have become vast fields of knowledge. Here they are dealt with only in so far as they bear directly on the nature of the human body, and reflect what the author has found to be useful in the course of his daily work and teaching. Every effort has been made to make the book representative of the latest British Research.

In the preparation of the present edition the author has become indebted to a very wide circle of friends too numerous to be mentioned individually. He cannot, however, allow the occasion to pass without a warm acknowledgment of his indebtedness to Dr. Alexander Low-, Lecturer on Embryology in the University of Aberdeen, for the help he has given.


ARTHUR KEITH.


Royal College of Surgeons of England, Lincoln's-Inn-Fields, W.C. 2, May, 1921.


1902 Edition

Keith 1902.jpg Online editor - See also the earlier Human Embryology and Morphology first edition (1902) by Arthur Keith.


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Human Embryology and Morphology: 1 Early Ovum and Embryo | 2 Connection between Foetus and Uterus | 3 Primitive Streak Notochord and Somites | 4 Age Changes | 5 Spinal Column and Back | 6 Body Segmentation | 7 Spinal Cord | 8 Mid- and Hind-Brains | 9 Fore-Brain | 10 Fore-Brain Cerebral Vesicles | 11 Cranium | 12 Face | 13 Teeth and Mastication | 14 Nasal and Olfactory | 15 Sense OF Sight | 16 Hearing | 17 Pharynx and Neck | 18 Tongue, Thyroid and Pharynx | 19 Organs of Digestion | 20 Circulatory System | 21 Circulatory System (continued) | 22 Respiratory System | 23 Urogenital System | 24 Urogenital System (Continued) | 25 Body Wall and Pelvic Floor | 26 Limb Buds | 27 Limbs | 28 Skin and Appendages | Figures




Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, September 19) Embryology Book - Human Embryology and Morphology (1921). Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_Human_Embryology_and_Morphology_(1921)

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