Book - Handbook of Pathological Anatomy 1

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Meckel JF. Handbook of Pathological Anatomy (Handbuch der pathologischen Anatomie) Vol. 1. (1812) Leipzig.

Volume 1: General Anatomy. Part I | General Anatomy. Part II: 1 Mucous System | 2 Vascular System | 3 Nervous System | 4 Osseous System | 5 Cartilaginous System | 6 Fibro-Cartilaginous System | 7 Fibrous System | 8 Muscular System | 9 Serous System | 10 Cutaneous System | 11 Glandular System | 12 The Accidental Formations | Historic Embryology (1812)
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Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Handbook of Pathological Anatomy Volume I (1812)

Manual of General, Descriptive, and Pathological Anatomy Vol. 1

By

J. F. Meckel,

(1812)


Professor of Anatomy at Halle,

Translated From The German Into French, With Additions And Notes, By A. J. L. Jourdan, Member of the Royal Academy of Medicine at Parie,

And G. Breschet, Adjunct Professor of Anatomy at the School of Medicine,

Translated From The French, with Notes, By A. Sidney Doane, A. M., M. D.

  1. Physician to the Philadelphia Hospital.
  2. Professor of Anatomy in the University of Pennsylvania.
  3. Professor of Op. Surgery in the College of Phys. and Surg., New York.
  4. Emeritus Professor of Anatomy in the University of Pennsylvania.
  5. Professor of Anatomy and Physiology in Columbia College, D. C.
  6. Professor of Anatomy and Physiology in College of Phys. and Surg., N. York.
  7. Professor of Surgery in the University of Maryland.
  8. Professor of Surgery in the College of Phys. and Surg., New York.
  9. Professor of Anatomy and Surgery in Harvard University, Boston.


IN THREE VOLUMES. VOLUME I.


NEW YORK:

HENRY C. SLEIGHT, CLINTON HALL.

BOSTON :

RICHARDSON, LORD, & HOLBROOK.

1831 .


Institute Hist Med.

Entered, according to act of Congress, in the year 1831, by Henry C- Sleight, in the office of the Clerk of the Southern District of New York


SLEIGHT AND HOBINBON, PRINTERS.


Dedication

To

George C. Shattuck, A. M., M, D., M. M. S., Of Boston,

These Volumes Are Respectfully Dedicated.

Preface of the American Translator

We feel ourselves called upon to state why the publication of this volume has been delayed so long ; should we mention all the adverse circumstances which have retarded its progress, it would be matter of surprise to many that it appears now : but we shall not trespass upon the patience of the public, and will only plead in excuse, the magnitude of the work, the difficulty of procuring a copy of the original with which to compare the translation, and the labor of this revision ; as these difficulties are in some measure removed, the publication will proceed in future without delay ; in fact, the second volume is now in the press.

In submitting our work to the profession, we claim their indulgence ; we know it to be defective, and but illy fitted to meet the eye of criticism : a translation seems to be an easy thing : we advance no new theories, are responsible for no assertions, and are not bound to defend the opinions of the author : our object is merely to present his views with plainness and perspicuity : we may read, we may understand, but if we attempt to convey the meaning to others, unexpected difficulties are encountered. These are increased if the work be translated through the medium of a second language, and still more, if this medium, like the French of Meckel's manual, (we say it with high respect for those eminent men whose names appear on the title page,) be incorrect. Farther, a work of this character demanded a more able interpreter, some one whose name would have been a passport to its excellence : let it be remembered, however, that the manual has now been extensively known for six years ; that (luring this time, translations have been annouucecl both in America and England, (in this country four to our knowledge,) and have been withdrawn, probably from the want of patronage, and we trust that our attempt will not appear presumptuous.


In regard to the original, Professor Meckel's reputation as an anatomist, and a man of profound science, is immense ; his works are extensively and favorably known in Europe ; and of all scientific works in a foreign language imported into this country, no one has been circulated so extensively as the French translation, which is now out of print. Farther, we have the written testimonies of some of the most eminent medical men in the United States, among whom we would mention Drs.Coates,(l) Horner,(2) Mott,(3) Physick,(4) Sewall,(5) J. A. Smith,(6) N. Smith, (7) Stevens,(8) and Warren,(9) (whose courtesy we take pleasure in acknowledging,) all of whom have been in the habit of referring to the work for years, and consider it one of the best treatises on anatomy ever written. We should not mention this, unless called upon by a passage in the preface to Cloquet's anatomy, translated by Dr. Knox of Edinburgh, and repubUshed in this country ; a good translation of a valuable work. We quote the passage. Speaking of Cloquet, the Dr. says : “ His omission of what is called ‘ General Anatomy,' with all its absurd theories, its tiresome diffuseness, its verbosity, and unprofitable minuteness, ought to be deemed by the student a great advantage, and a recommendation of the work ; and should any one doubt this, let him peruse the first volume of the ‘ Manuel d'Anatomie Générale, descriptive, et pathologique,' by J. F. Meckel, where he will find, under the title ‘ General Anatomy,' all the absurdities without the good sense contained in the Elementa Physiologic of Haller ; and in addition, more idle, extravagant, unintelligible theories, misnamed anatomical, than ever yet were collected in a single volume.


We should not expect, after this thorough condemnation of general anatomy without trial or jury, we had almost said without a judge, to find the Doctor employing his time and talents in translating a work on the same subject. One would think, too, that in guarding against absurd theories, absurdities stated as facts would have been avoided ; yet this is not the case. The translation of Cloquet has been followed by that of Béclard's General An atomy, into which Dr. Knox has introduced manystrange things, not idle, extravagant, unintelligible theories, pardonable terms in regard to a favorite opinion, but statements professing to be facts, absolutely contradictory to common sense.[1] We admit that the French translation of Meckel contains assertions on one page which are contradicted in the next ; these, perhaps, may be found in our volumes, but a mere reference to the original will prove them to be errors of translation ; it is surely something new in criticism to attach the responsibility of these to the author, and if the position be tenable, we would only say - poor Baclard ! We respect Dr. Knox for his talents and information, but not for consistency,[2] or for possessing that tone of kind feeling and liberal sentiment, which ought to exist between the educated men of every nation.


We have admitted in the preceding paragraph, that contradictions occur in the French translation, which was evidently hurried : some of these errors are important to the student, and to correct them, our translation has been compared with the original. Here, the translator and publisher would acknowledge their obligations to Dr. Alfred C. Post, of this city, for his generous kindness in translating several notes and passages omitted in the French, and for the correction of several errors in the text ; but he is not responsible for those which may have passed unnoticed. Dr. Post's opportunities have been great; the best advantages which our country aflbrd, have been open to him : added to these, by residing in France and Germany, and by attending lectures at the most celebrated universities he has acquired a good knowledge of the languages of those countries, and can command new sources of learning. The path of usefulness is now open before him, in which we most cordially wish him success.


We have endeavored in the American translation to present the meaning of the author faithfully : but we regret, that notwithstanding the utmost care in revising the manuscript and correcting the proofs, some errors are introduced ; the most important are noticed in our errata, and for them we would again ask indulgence. The volumes are already so large, that we have increased them only by adding such facts as have been observed since the publication of the French ; the original notes of Professor Meckel are designated by figures ; to those added by the French translator, the letters F. T. are attached ; our own are marked with an asterisk* : for them we have depended on the medical journals, more especially the American Journal of the Medical Sciences, published at Philadelphia, whose Quarterly Periscope presents a brief summary of the discoveries made throughout the world.


Hitherto, we have depended for our advance in the science of anatomy principally upon Europe. While the American practice of medicine combines the advantages of the different European systems, and our medical men are not deficient in talents and application, the unjust and oppressive laws of our country exclude them from the study of anatomy. We say unjust and oppressive ; what can be more so, than to make a surgeon amenable to a civil tribunal for a professional error, while at the same time, if detected in attempting to gain the knowledge necessary to avoid those errors, he is exposed to fine, imprisonment, the stigma of public opinion, and the risk of being torn to pieces by an infuriated mob. We congratulate the profession, however, that the time is rapidly approaching, when the study of anatomy may be prosecuted in this country without the dread of the debtor's or of the state prison. Through the continued and well directed efforts of Dr. John C. Warren, the able Professor of Anatomy and Surgery in Harvard University, the legislature of Massachusetts have finally passed an act legalizing the study of anatomy ; this act imposes additional penalties for violating the sepulchres of the dead, but at the same time it is all that any reasonable medical man can wish. Dr. W.'s exertions in the cause of science have been great, and this last effort, happily crowned with success, entitles him anew to the gratitude of the profession. We hope that the course of the legislature of Massachusetts will be followed by the governments of the other states, and anatomy will then receive that attention which its importance demands.

But we trespass upon the public, and will conclude with observing that no exertions shall be spared to render the succeeding volumes of our translation worthy of their patronage.


New York, Nov. 10.


Preface to the French Translation

We have long wished for a work which should comprise all the important facts of General, Descriptive, and Pathological Anatomy, and of Physiology. A task so arduous demanded a knowledge both extensive and profound, and could be accomphshed only by one of the first anatomists of the age. Meckel, who honorably sustains the medical reputation of his family, and to whom the world is indebted for several productions of merit, has fearlessly undertaken this laborious work. His treatise on anatomy is considered as a standard in his own country, and will doubtless be favorably received in this. It is one of the finest productions of Bichat's school, Bichat, the envy of all Europe, and to whom Meckel has paid the most brilliant tribute of respect that talent can pay to genius, by professing for him a calm admiration. We have been careful in our translation to add all the new facts which have been discovered since the publication of the original.[3]


  1. Such as comparing a muscle to a mitten! &c. For a nice dissection of Dr. Knox's translation, see the preface to the American version by J. Togno, M. D., published at Philadelphia, 1830.
  2. We almost repent of this charge, more especially if the work was selected by the Doctor “ with the consent of his publishers, as one worthy of translation,” and if the medical men on the other side of the Atlantic ever feel, as do many on this, the wholesome stimulus of prospective want.
  3. Handbuch der menschlichen Anatomie, Halle and Berlin. Vol. i. 1816. Gen. Anatomy. Osteology, Syndesrnology, and Myology, Vol- ii. 1816. Angciology and Neurology, Vol. iii. 1817. Sphlanchnology and Embrylogy, Vol. iv. 1820.

Table of Contents




Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Reference

Meckel JF. Handbook of Pathological Anatomy (Handbuch der pathologischen Anatomie) Vol. 1. (1812) Leipzig.

Volume 1. Table of Contents

Volume 1: General Anatomy. Part I | General Anatomy. Part II: 1 Mucous System | 2 Vascular System | 3 Nervous System | 4 Osseous System | 5 Cartilaginous System | 6 Fibro-Cartilaginous System | 7 Fibrous System | 8 Muscular System | 9 Serous System | 10 Cutaneous System | 11 Glandular System | 12 The Accidental Formations | Historic Embryology (1812)



Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, October 22) Embryology Book - Handbook of Pathological Anatomy 1. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_Handbook_of_Pathological_Anatomy_1

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