Book - Aids to Embryology (1948)

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Baxter JS. Aids to Embryology. (1948) 4th Edition, Bailliere, Tindall And Cox, London.

Contents: 1. Germ Cells | 2. Segmentation and Germ Layer Formation | 3. Changes in Female Genital Tract | 4. Implantation and Placentation | 5. Formation of the Embryo | 6. Skin and Accessory Structures | 7. Nervous System | 8. Special Sense | 9. Alimentary Canal | 10. Circulatory System | 11. Coelomic Cavities | 12. Urogenital System | 13. Muscular and Skeletal Systems | 14. Hereditary
Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
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Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
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This historic 1948 textbook by Baxter is a brief outline of human development as understood at the time.



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Modern Notes: Embryology Textbooks

Aids to Embryology

J. S. Baxter


M.A., M.Sc., M.D., F.R.C.S.I.

Senior Lecturer in Anatomy, University of Bristol


Fourth Edition

London

Bailliere, Tindall And Cox

7 & 8, Henrietta St., Covent Garden, W.C. 2

1948


  • First Edition, May, 1928
  • Reprinted, March, 1933
  • Second Edition, October, 1934
  • Third Edition, April, 1938
  • Fourth Edition, February, 1948


This book is produced in complete conformity with the authorized economy standards.

Preface to the Fourth Edition

This book owes its inception to Dr. R. H. Hunter of Queen's University, Belfast, and the first three editions came from his pen. He has now retired from active teaching and when a fourth edition was called for, I, as one of his former students, was asked to take over the work. I have not altered the plan of the book and it is still intended primarily for the medical student preparing for the Second Professional Examinations of Universities and Colleges. Nevertheless, it is hoped that it may perhaps have a wider appeal, and that those reading for other examinations requiring a knowledge of human development may benefit from a study of its pages.

The many advances in our knowledge of human embryology since 1938, when the last edition of this book was published, necessitated a drastic revision, and the opportunity was taken almost completely to re-write it. Several new illustrations have been inserted and others re-drawn.

The index is the work of Mrs. W. B. Howell, to whom I express my sincere thanks, not only for this, bn 1- also for her care in reading the proofs.

J. S. BAXTER.


University of Bristol,

November, 1947.

Contents

Introduction

  1. I. The Germ Cells
  2. II. Segmentation and Germ Layer Formation
  3. III. Changes in the Female Genital Tract
  4. IV. Implantation and Placentation
  5. V. Formation of the Embryo. Determination of Age
  6. VI. The Skin and its Accessory Structures
  7. VII. The Nervous System
  8. VIII. Development of the Organs of Special Sense
  9. IX. The Alimentary Canal and Related Structures
  10. X. The Circulatory System
  11. XI. The Coelomic Cavities
  12. XII. The Urogenital System
  13. XIII. The Muscular and Skeletal Systems
  14. XIV. The Transmission Of Hereditary Characters

Appendix

Introduction

Embryology is the study of the changes undergone by the living organism from the time of fertilisation (i.e., union of the male and female germ cells) until adult life and maturity are reached. Such a mature individual possesses the necessary organs for the formation of new germ cells - spermatozoa in the case of the male, and ova in the case of the female - so that the species may be perpetuated.


The more dramatic and important developmental changes occur before birth, and so, in the restricted sense, the study of embryology is often confined to this period, the pre-natal period. But we must not forget that important changes, more particularly in histogenesis and growth, continue after birth and constitute the post-natal phase of development.


A knowledge of embryology is essential to the student of medicine for several reasons. The form and relations of many adult structures are explicable only in terms of their development. Abnormalities and deviations from the normal, which may be encountered in clinical work, likewise owe their explanation to a knowledge of normal embryology. The anatomy and physiology of reproduction and the formation of the foetal membranes and placenta bear closely on the work of the obstetrician and gynaecologist, while the endocrinologist also finds interest in the subject of human development.


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
Contents: 1. Germ Cells | 2. Segmentation and Germ Layer Formation | 3. Changes in Female Genital Tract | 4. Implantation and Placentation | 5. Formation of the Embryo | 6. Skin and Accessory Structures | 7. Nervous System | 8. Special Sense | 9. Alimentary Canal | 10. Circulatory System | 11. Coelomic Cavities | 12. Urogenital System | 13. Muscular and Skeletal Systems | 14. Hereditary

Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, September 18) Embryology Book - Aids to Embryology (1948). Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_Aids_to_Embryology_(1948)

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