Book - A textbook of general embryology (1913)

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A personal message from Dr Mark Hill (May 2020)  
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I have decided to take early retirement in September 2020. During the many years online I have received wonderful feedback from many readers, researchers and students interested in human embryology. I especially thank my research collaborators and contributors to the site. The good news is Embryology will remain online and I will continue my association with UNSW Australia. I look forward to updating and including the many exciting new discoveries in Embryology!

Kellicott WE. A Textbook of General Embryology (1913) Henry Holt and Co., New York.

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This historic 1913 embryology textbook by William Erskine Kellicott (1878-1919).

Also by this author: Kellicott WE. Outlines of Chordate Development (1913) Henry Holt and Co., New York.

Internet Archive

Budington RA. (1919). WILLIAM ERSKINE KELLICOTT. Science , 49, 322-3. PMID: 17833637 DOI.

Historic Embryology Textbooks

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Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

A Textbook of General Embryology

by William Erskine Kellicott (1878-1919)

New York, Henry Holt And Company, 1913


Preface

General embryology should occupy an important place in the collegiate study of biology. In no other connection are the essential phenomena of life better illustrated, in no other form are they more readily appreciated. The facts of embryology lead directly to the great problems of the science of biology as it exists to-day, and many fundamental biological conceptions either are directly connected with, or are illuminated by, the study of the early phenomena of individual development.

The author's experience has clearly indicated that the subject has this value as a collegiate study. Indeed, the book is the direct outgrowth of such experience, and it ha«, in substance, been in use as such a text for several years. In its present form it is hoped that it will be found useful to the student who is endeavoring to comprehend the general principles of the science of life, as well as to the student preparing for the professional study of some field of biology or of medicine.

Its design as a textbook, rather than as a handbook, accounts for certain characteristics. The topics considered have throughout been approached from the standpoint of their general biological relations, and m the selection of the facts mentioned and the topics discussed, as well as in the style and method of presentation, the student has been first in mind. The arraugement of the subject matter in two sizes of type may prove useful for those undertaking a brief course. In a few instances this has involved slight repetition, but repetition is not always a pedagogic evil.

At the end of each chapter will be found a list of references to literature. Usefulness to the student has been the only criterion in determining the admission of titles to these lists. Consequently there will be found titles of works of historical importance, of recent works containing contributions of importance or representing present tendencies in research, and of papers containing extensive literature references, valuable illustrations, or general summaries. As far as possible the lists contain references to works presenting both, or several, sides of mooted questions mentioned in the text. There will also be found, in nearly every instance, the titles of papers from which illustrations may have been taken.

To a large extent the figures have been redrawn, from the original sources, for this work: it is a pleasure to notice the uniform courtesy with which authors have granted permission to make this use of their illustrations. The following special debts are gratefully acknowledged: to Prof. Edmund B. Wilson and The Macmillan Company, for cliches and for permission to copy a considerable number of illustrations in their "The Cell in Development and Inheritance"; to Prof. Gary N. Calkins, The Macmillan Company, and Lea and Febiger, for cliches and for permission to copy certain illustrations in their "The Protozoa and "Protozoology"; to Prof. Ulric Dahlgren, Prof. William A. Kepner, and The Macmillan Company, for permission to copy certain illustrations in their "Principles of Animal Histology"; to Prof. J. W. Jenkinson and the Delegates and Secretary of the Clarendon Press, for cliches from their " Experimental Embryology"; and finally to Herr Gustav Fischer and to the several authors, for cliches and for permission to copy or otherwise make use of illustrations from Korschelt and Heider's "Lehrbuch," Oscar Hertwig's "Handbuch," Doflein's "Protozooenkunde," and Ziegler's "Lehrbuch." In every instance specific reference, both to the immediate and the ultimate sources of the figures borrowed, is made in the legends. I desire also to acknowledge my indebtedness to the authorities of The Johns Hopkins University, for the use of valuable library facilities.

W. E. K

Baltimore, Md., March, 1913.

Contents

  1. Ontogeny
  2. The cell and cell division
  3. The germ cells and their formation
  4. Maturation
  5. Fertilization
  6. Cleavage
  7. The germ cells and the processes of differentiation, heredity, and sex determination
  8. The blastxtla, gastrula, and germ layers. Morphogenetic processes


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Kellicott WE. A Textbook of General Embryology (1913) Henry Holt and Co., New York.

Kellicott (1913): 1 Ontogeny | 2 The cell and cell division | 3 The germ cells and their formation | 4 Maturation | 5 Fertilization | 6 Cleavage | 7 The germ cells and the processes of differentiation, heredity, and sex determination | 8 The blastxtla, gastrula, and germ layers. Morphogenetic processes


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2020, July 8) Embryology Book - A textbook of general embryology (1913). Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_A_textbook_of_general_embryology_(1913)

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