Whale Development

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A personal message from Dr Mark Hill (May 2020)  
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I have decided to take early retirement in September 2020. During the many years online I have received wonderful feedback from many readers, researchers and students interested in human embryology. I especially thank my research collaborators and contributors to the site. The good news is Embryology will remain online and I will continue my association with UNSW Australia. I look forward to updating and including the many exciting new discoveries in Embryology!

Introduction

Sperm whale
Sperm Whale Cow and Calf (Physeter macrocephalus)

Draft Page. (notice removed when completed)


Animal Development: axolotl | bat | cat | chicken | cow | dog | dolphin | echidna | fly | frog | goat | grasshopper | guinea pig | hamster | horse | kangaroo | koala | lizard | medaka | mouse | opossum | pig | platypus | rabbit | rat | sea squirt | sea urchin | sheep | worm | zebrafish | life cycles | development timetable | development models | K12
Historic Embryology  
1897 Pig | 1900 Chicken | 1901 Lungfish | 1904 Sand Lizard | 1905 Rabbit | 1906 Deer | 1907 Tarsiers | 1908 Human | 1909 Northern Lapwing | 1909 South American and African Lungfish | 1910 Salamander | 1951 Frog | Embryology History | Historic Disclaimer

Some Recent Findings

More recent papers  
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This table allows an automated computer search of the external PubMed database using the listed "Search term" text link.

  • This search now requires a manual link as the original PubMed extension has been disabled.
  • The displayed list of references do not reflect any editorial selection of material based on content or relevance.
  • References also appear on this list based upon the date of the actual page viewing.


References listed on the rest of the content page and the associated discussion page (listed under the publication year sub-headings) do include some editorial selection based upon both relevance and availability.

More? References | Discussion Page | Journal Searches | 2019 References | 2020 References

Search term: Whale Embryology | Whale Development

Older papers  
These papers originally appeared in the Some Recent Findings table, but as that list grew in length have now been shuffled down to this collapsible table.

See also the Discussion Page for other references listed by year and References on this current page.

Overview

Sperm Whale

  • live at least 60-70 years.
  • form “nursery schools” that contain between 20 and 30 whales; females, calves, and juveniles (male and female).
  • the brain is the largest of any animal, about 9 kilograms.
  • Adult males (bulls) reach more than 15 metres (50 feet) in length and weigh 54,400 kilograms (120,000 pounds, 60 tons).
  • Adult females (cows) reach more than 11 metres (36 feet) and weigh 25,000 kilograms (55,000 pounds, 27.5 tons).
  • Newborn (calves) are about 4 metres (13 feet) long and weigh only 1,000 kilograms (2,200 pounds, 1.1 tons).
    • a calf is born to a female only every 4 to 6 years.
    • calves stay with the mother for between 1 and 2 years.


Taxon

Embryonic Stages

Limb Development

Morphological comparison and schematic diagram of mammalian limbs[1]

Limb comparison cartoon 02.jpg

Neural Development

Historic Images

Abnormalities

References

  1. Dai M, Wang Y, Fang L, Irwin DM, Zhu T, Zhang J, Zhang S & Wang Z. (2014). Differential expression of Meis2, Mab21l2 and Tbx3 during limb development associated with diversification of limb morphology in mammals. PLoS ONE , 9, e106100. PMID: 25166052 DOI.

Reviews

Articles

Search Pubmed: octopus development

Historic

Additional Images

External Links

External Links Notice - The dynamic nature of the internet may mean that some of these listed links may no longer function. If the link no longer works search the web with the link text or name. Links to any external commercial sites are provided for information purposes only and should never be considered an endorsement. UNSW Embryology is provided as an educational resource with no clinical information or commercial affiliation.


Animal Development: axolotl | bat | cat | chicken | cow | dog | dolphin | echidna | fly | frog | goat | grasshopper | guinea pig | hamster | horse | kangaroo | koala | lizard | medaka | mouse | opossum | pig | platypus | rabbit | rat | sea squirt | sea urchin | sheep | worm | zebrafish | life cycles | development timetable | development models | K12
Historic Embryology  
1897 Pig | 1900 Chicken | 1901 Lungfish | 1904 Sand Lizard | 1905 Rabbit | 1906 Deer | 1907 Tarsiers | 1908 Human | 1909 Northern Lapwing | 1909 South American and African Lungfish | 1910 Salamander | 1951 Frog | Embryology History | Historic Disclaimer


Glossary Links

Glossary: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Numbers | Symbols | Term Link



Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2020, August 13) Embryology Whale Development. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Whale_Development

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© Dr Mark Hill 2020, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G