Talk:Madrid Collection

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The collection was started in 1935 by Professor Orts-Llorca (1905-1993) after its embryological formation in Paris with Henri Rouviere (1875-1952), in Brussels with Albert Dalcq (1893-1973), in Vienna with Alfred Fischel (1868-1938) and Munich with Walter Vogt (1888-1941) and Johannes Holtfreter (1901 - 1992). Professor Orts-Llorca was in Valencia during the Spanish Civil War (1936-39) and then in Cádiz (1939-1953) where he continued his collection of human embryos. In 1954 he was named full professor at the Central University of Madrid (Complutense current) enriching its collection (Orts-Llorca, 1984). In 1977 he was succeeded by Professor Juan Jiménez-Collado (1932) who incorporated his own embryo collection and also created of the Complutense Institute of Embryology (1980). Professor Jiménez-Collado was Head of the institute that today is led by

(Modified from text by Prof Luis-Alfonso Arráez-Aybar)


Image source: The Hinrichsen Collection images are reproduced with the permission of Prof. Beate Brand-Saberi, Head, Department of Anatomy and Molecular Embryology, Ruhr-Universität Bochum. Images are for educational purposes only and cannot be reproduced electronically or in writing without permission.

Image source: The Madrid Collection images are reproduced with the permission of Prof. Rodríguez-Vázquez, Head, Embryology Institute of Complutense University of Madrid. Images are for educational purposes only and cannot be reproduced electronically or in writing without permission.

Embryonic cardiac morphometry in Carnegie stages 15-23, from the Complutense University of Madrid Institute of Embryology Human Embryo Collection

Cells Tissues Organs. 2008;187(3):211-20. Epub 2007 Dec 5.

Arráez-Aybar LA1, Turrero-Nogués A, Marantos-Gamarra DG.


Prof. L.A. Arráez-Aybar Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology II Faculty of Medicine, University Complutense ES–28040 Madrid (Spain) Tel. +34 91 394 1345, Fax +34 91 394 1339, E-Mail arraezla@med.ucm.es


Complutense University of Madrid Institute of Embryology Human Embryo Collection (CUMIEHEC).


Abstract

AIMS: We performed a morphometric study of cardiac development on human embryos to complement the scarce data on human embryonic cardiac morphometry and to attempt to establish, from these, algorithms describing cardiac growth during the second month of gestation. METHODS: Thirty human embryos from Carnegie stages 15-23 were included in the study. Shrinkage and compression effects from fixation and inclusion in paraffin were considered in our calculations. RESULTS: Growth of the cardiac (whole heart) volume and volume of ventricular myocardium through the Carnegie stages were analysed by ANOVA. Linear correlation was used to describe the relationship between the ventricular myocardium and cardiac volumes. Comparisons of models were carried out through the R2 statistic. The relationship volume of ventricular myocardium versus cardiac volume is expressed by the equation: cardiac volume = 0.6266 + 2.4778 volume of ventricular myocardium. The relationship cardiac volume versus crown-rump length is expressed by the equation: cardiac volume = 1.3 e(0.126 CR length), where e is the base of natural logarithms. CONCLUSION: At a clinical level, these results can contribute towards the establishment of a normogram for cardiac development, useful for the design of strategies for early diagnosis of congenital heart disease. They can also help in the study of embryogenesis, for example in the discussion of ventricular trabeculation. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID 18057862

<pubmed>18057862</pubmed>| Cells Tissues Organs

Heart Timecourse

Human Heart Timeline
Characteristic Carnegie stage: 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Septum primum
Foramen primum
Atrioventricular bundle
Atrioventricular cushions
Conotruncal ridges
Foramen secundum
Semilunar cusps
Conotruncal septum; atria
Closure primum foramen
Fusion atrioventricular cushions
Septum secundum and foramen ovale
Closure secondary interventricular foramen
Chordae tendineae
  Colour Coding: beginning to appear present    Table data[1]    Links: heart | Madrid Collection
Characteristic Carnegie stage: 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Septum primum
Foramen primum
Atrioventricular bundle
Atrioventricular cushions
Conotruncal ridges
Foramen secundum
Semilunar cusps
Conotruncal septum; atria
Closure primum foramen
Fusion atrioventricular cushions
Septum secundum and foramen ovale
Closure secondary interventricular foramen
Chordae tendineae
Colour Coding: beginning to appear present
Reference: Madrid Collection <pubmed>18057862</pubmed>

Study Embryos

Carnegie
Stage
Embryo Days CRL (mm) Section
thickness
Staining Section plane
15 GV4 36 7 8 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) transverse
16 MAR 3 38 8 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-Azan frontal
16 BOT9 39 9 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) transverse
16 CN 2 39 9.5 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) sagittal
16 FAUS 4 40 9.7 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) frontal
16 CA 2 40 10 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-Azan transverse
16 FE 1 40 10.5 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) transverse
17 CN 4 41 11 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) transverse
17 J1 41 11.5 10 Bielschowsky (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) frontal
17 MAR 4 42 12 10 {{HE} transverse
17 VE-4 43 12.5 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) transverse
18 GV-6 44 13 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-Azan transverse
18 Ve 44 13.5 10 {{HE} sagittal
18 JF2 45 14.5 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-trichrome transverse
18 NO 45 15 10 {{HE} transverse
18 J5 46 16.5 10 {{HE} frontal
19 PA 47 17 10 {{HE} transverse
19 Civ1 48 18 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-Azan transverse
20 CAS 20 49 20 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-Azan frontal
20 CN3 50 21 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) transverse
20 BOT21 50 21 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-trichrome sagittal
21 GV 7 51 22 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) sagittal
22 RX 53 23.5 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) transverse
22 H7 54 24 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) transverse
22 R3 55 25 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) frontal
22 Eo2 55 26 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-trichrome transverse
23 Mes-2 56 27 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-trichrome frontal
23 C11 57 28 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin)-trichrome transverse
23 Bot 4 58 29 10 Bielschowsky (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) transverse
23 CA 4 59 31 10 (Stain - Haematoxylin Eosin) frontal


0.841 2.81 1.1426 3.05 1.265 3.52 1.6992 4.13 1.6 4.027 1.8362 4.55 1.9014 5.04 2.2716 5.26 2.3844 6.1 2.5851 7.34 2.463 7.16 2.6847 8.02 2.97 8.4 2.7145 7.59 3.2847 9.53 4.0762 11.08 4.2633 11.72 4.69 12.98 5.37 14.07 5.4428 14.42 6.5004 16.94 6.9892 18.89 8.781 20.53 10.039 23.04 11.2284 27.96 19.2014 40.61 12.3937 38.95 15.9925 39.78 23.055 56.47 27.14 72.53 100 109 125.267 146.975 143.309 161.922 179.360 187.189 217.082 261.210 254.804 285.409 298.932 270.107 339.146 394.306 417.082 461.922 500.712 513.167 602.847 672.242 730.605 819.929 995 1,445.196 1,386.121 2,581.139 2,009.608 2,581.139

Image source

The collection was started in 1935 by Professor Orts-Llorca (1905-1993) after its embryological formation in Paris with Henri Rouviere (1875-1952), in Brussels with Albert Dalcq (1893-1973), in Vienna with Alfred Fischel (1868-1938) and Munich with Walter Vogt (1888-1941) and Johannes Holtfreter (1901 - 1992). In Valencia live the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). In Cádiz (1939-1953) overcomes the difficulties associated with it, which did not prevent him form his collection of human embryos. In 1954 he was named full professor at the Central University of Madrid (Complutense current) enriching its collection (Orts-Llorca, 1984). In 1977 he was succeeded by Professor Juan Jiménez-Collado (1932) who incorporates his own collection and manages the creation of the Complutense Institute of Embryology. This is created in 1980, incorporating both seasons. Professor Jiménez-Collado is named Head of it. In 2002 Professor José-Vicente Sanz-Casado (1957) happens and your current Head.

Orts-Llorca F. 1984. Embriones y fetos humanos de diversas universidades españolas. Madrid: Editorial Universidad Complutense


A glance at Spanish embryology and teratology during the XX century through the academic life of Francisco Orts-Llorca (1905-1993)

Int J Dev Biol. 2009;53(8-10):1165-77. doi: 10.1387/ijdb.072492ja.

Aréchaga J1, Jiménez-Collado J, Ruano-Gil D. Author information

Abstract Francisco Ort-Llorca (1905-1993) was one of the most outstanding Spanish embryologists of the XX century. He was disciple of Henri Rouvire in Paris (France), Alfred Fischel in Vienna (Austria), Walther Vogt in Munich (Germany) and Pedro Ara in Madrid (Spain). From 1935, he was professor of Human Anatomy at the Faculty of Medicine of Cadiz, belonged then to the University of Seville (accidentally, in the University of Valencia, during the Spanish Civil War from 1936-1939) and, later on, at the Faculty of Medicine of Madrid (Complutense University) from 1954 to 1975. He was internationally recognized in anatomical sciences and stood out for his contributions to descriptive and experimental Embryology and Teratology, particularly in those aspects connected to the normal and pathological development of the heart and visual organs. PMID 19924623

<pubmed>19924623</pubmed>

PMID 4428951


Orts-Llorca F (1984) Embriones y fetos humanos de diversas Universidades españolas. Editorial Universidad Complutense.

Contact

Prof Luis Arráez Aybar

Prof Sanz-Casado

Departamento de Anatomía y Anatomía Patológica Comparada (Anatomía y Embriología)

http://www.ucm.es/dep-anatomiayembriologia

Department of Anatomy and Comparative Pathology (Anatomy and Embryology)


Universidad Complutense de Madrid

https://www.ucm.es


Morphogenesis of the manubrium of sternum in human embryos: a new concept

Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2013 Feb;296(2):279-89. doi: 10.1002/ar.22623. Epub 2012 Nov 19.

Rodríguez-Vázquez JF1, Verdugo-López S, Garrido JM, Murakami G, Kim JH.

Abstract

To revisit many theories on fetal development of the manubrium of the sternum, we examined 25 mid-term fetuses at 6-9 weeks of gestation. The initial developmental stage of the manubrium was characterized by a distinct interclavicular mesenchyme that was continuous with the developing clavicles. Because parts of the clavicle in which endochondral ossification occurs originate from the neural crest, the interclavicular mesenchyme seems to be of the same origin. The sternal bands, possibly of the lateral plate origin, were restricted at the anterior ends of the ribs in the paired thoracic walls. The interclavicular mesenchyme extended caudally and laterally to reach the anterior ends of the first ribs, and thus the interclavicular mesenchyme expanded into the intercostoclavicular mesenchyme. Then, the primitive manubrium was delimited by the sternoclavicular joint and its related ligaments, all of which developed from the interclavicular and intercostoclavicular mesenchymes. Although the first ribs were attached to the intercostoclavicular mesenchyme, the former was vimentin-negative in contrast to the latter, positive mesenchyme. Soon afterwards, the small upper end of the sternal bands was integrated into the intercostoclavicular mesenchyme to form the primitive manubrium. The infrahyoid muscles and their supplying nerves maintained a close topographical relation to the interclavicular or intercostoclavicular mesenchyme, whereas the pectoralis major muscle kept attachments to the sternal bands. Consequently, the manubrium of sternum appeared to develop in a complex way at a junction area between derivatives of the neural crest, lateral plate, and somite. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID 23165944

  1. Arráez-Aybar LA, Turrero-Nogués A & Marantos-Gamarra DG. (2008). Embryonic cardiac morphometry in Carnegie stages 15-23, from the Complutense University of Madrid Institute of Embryology Human Embryo Collection. Cells Tissues Organs (Print) , 187, 211-20. PMID: 18057862 DOI.