Difference between revisions of "Reports"

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:'''Links:''' [[Australian Statistics]] | [[Abnormal_Development_-_Folic_Acid_and_Neural_Tube_Defects|Folic Acid and Neural Tube Defects]] | [[Abnormal Development - Iodine Deficiency|Iodine Deficiency]]
  
 
==USA==
 
==USA==

Revision as of 14:40, 29 June 2011

Introduction

A start page for exploring reports that relate to embryological development. Many of these contain statistical analysis of country by country or world data by various government and non-government bodies.


Reports - Give a spoken or written account of something that one has observed, heard, done, or investigated.


Statistics Links: Introduction | Reports | World Population | World Fertility | World Infant Mortality | Maternal Mortality | Australia | Brazil | Canada | China | Germany | India | Indonesia | Europe | Myanmar | Netherlands | Spain | United Kingdom | Romania | Uganda | United States | BGD Tutorial - Applied Embryology and Teratology | National Perinatal Statistics Unit | AIHW | Category:Statistics
Australia’s mothers and babies: 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | National Perinatal Statistics Unit | AIHW | Australian Statistics | birth

Some Recent Findings

Australia

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

(AIHW)

  • Australia’s mothers and babies 2007[1] | 2008[2]
  • Mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification in Australia and New Zealand: baseline report for monitoring[3] 11 May 2011
    • The Australia and New Zealand Food Regulation Ministerial Council (the Ministerial Council) requested that Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) consider mandatory folic acid fortification to help reduce the incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs) (serious birth defects), and mandatory iodine fortification to tackle the re-emergence of iodine deficiency in the population.
    • In response, FSANZ developed two mandatory standards, effective from October 2009, which require the addition of folic acid to bread- making flour in Australia, and iodine (via iodised salt) to bread in Australia and New Zealand.
    • This report presents baseline data for each component of the monitoring framework, and makes observations for future monitoring.
  • Nursing and midwifery labour force 2008[4] 13 Oct 2010
    • In 2008 the total number of registered and enrolled nurses estimated by the Nursing and Midwifery Labour Force Survey was 312,736, an increase of 10.6% since 2004.
    • The nursing workforce continued to age between 1997 and 2008; the proportion of nurses aged 50 years or over increased from 18.9% to 34.4%.
    • The number of full time equivalent nurses per 100,000 population increased by 15.2% between 2004 and 2008, and the profession continued to be predominantly female, with females comprising 91% of employed nurses in 2008.

National Health and Medical Research Council

(NHMRC)

  • Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand Including Recommended Dietary Intakes.[5] 2006 PDF
    • The Nutrient Reference Values outline the levels of intake of essential nutrients considered to be adequate to meet the known nutritional needs of practically all healthy people for prevention of deficiency states. The document can be used by health professionals to assess the likelihood of inadequate intake in individuals or groups of people.


Links: Australian Statistics | Folic Acid and Neural Tube Defects | Iodine Deficiency

USA

USA spina bifida rates
File:USA births fertility 2010

CDC/National Center for Health Statistics

  • CDC Report 2005 Trends in Spina Bifida and Anencephalus in the United States[6] In the U.S.A. the Food and Drug Administration in 1996 authorized that all enriched cereal grain products be fortified with folic acid, with optional fortification beginning in March 1996 and mandatory fortification in January 1998. The data in the report shows the subsequent changes in anencephaly and spina bifida rate over that period.
  • Recent Trends in Births and Fertility Rates Through 2010[7] online report | PDF
    • The broad-based decline in births and fertility rates from 2007 through 2009 is now well-documented. An earlier NCHS Health E-Stat showed the overall birth count and fertility rate continuing to decline through the first 6 months of 2010. This report updates and extends the trend through December 2010.
    • The provisional count of births in the United States for 2010 (12-month period ending December 2010) was 4,007,000. This count was 3 percent less than the number of births in 2009 (4,131,019) and 7 percent less than the all-time high of 4,316,233 births in 2007.
    • The provisional fertility rate for 2010 was 64.7 births per 1,000 women aged 15–44. This was 3 percent less than the 2009 preliminary rate of 66.7 and 7 percent less than the 17-year high of 69.5 in 2007


Links: USA Statistics

References

  1. Laws P & Sullivan EA 2009. Australia's mothers and babies 2007 AIHW Perinatal statistics series no. 23 Cat. no. PER 48. Sydney: AIHW National Perinatal Statistics Unit.
  2. Laws P & Sullivan EA 2010. Australia's mothers and babies 2008 AIHW Perinatal statistics series no. 24 Cat. no. PER 48. Sydney: AIHW National Perinatal Statistics Unit.
  3. AIHW 2011. Mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification in Australia and New Zealand: baseline report for monitoring. Cat. no. PHE 139. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed 20 June 2011. PDF
  4. AIHW 2010. Nursing and midwifery labour force 2008. Cat. no. AUS 130. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed 29 June 2011 http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=6442468396.
  5. Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand Including Recommended Dietary Intakes. (2006) http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/publications/synopses/n35syn.htm PDF
  6. CDC Trends in Spina Bifida and Anencephalus in the United States, 1991-2005
  7. Sutton PD, Hamilton BE, Mathews TJ. Recent Trends in Births and Fertility Rates Through 2010 NCHS data brief MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2011.online report | PDF


External Links

External Links Notice - The dynamic nature of the internet may mean that some of these listed links may no longer function. If the link no longer works search the web with the link text or name. Links to any external commercial sites are provided for information purposes only and should never be considered an endorsement. UNSW Embryology is provided as an educational resource with no clinical information or commercial affiliation.


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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2020, October 31) Embryology Reports. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Reports

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© Dr Mark Hill 2020, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G