Paper - The anatomy and development of the systemic lymphatic vessels in the domestic cat

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Huntington GS. The anatomy and development of the systemic lymphatic vessels in the domestic cat. (1911) Memoirs of the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology No. 1.

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This historic 1911 paper by Huntington describes early cat lymphatic development.



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The Anatomy and Development of the Systemic Lymphatic Vessels in the Domestic Cat

George Sumner Huntington
George Sumner Huntington (1861 - 1927)

Geo. S. Huntington

From Thb Anatomical Laboratory of Columbia University, Philadelphia, Pa 1911


Composed And Phintsd At The Waverly Press

By the Williams & Wilkins Company

Baltimork, U. S. A.


Contents

Introduction

Part I. The development of the systemic lymphatic vessels in their relation to the blood-vascular system

  • Historical review of theories of lymphatic development
  • Material used in present investigation
  • Comparison of haemal and lymphatic vascular development
  • Ontogeny of mammalian systemic lymphatic vessels
  • Mutual relations of developing systemic lymphatic vessels and embryonic veins
  • Phylogenetic relations of the abdominal veins and axial lymphatics in mammals
  • Development of systemic lymphatic vessels in the mammal independent of topographical association with embryonal veins
  • Summary and conclusions of Part 1

+ Figs. 1 to 28

Part II. The development of the preazygos and azygos segments of the thoracic ducts

1. The thoracic duct approach of the jugular lymph sacs Figs 29 to 91.

2. The preazygos segment

Adult conditions Figs. 92 to 99.

The development of the broncho-me<liastinal trunk Figs. 100 to 158.

The development of the preazygos segment of the thoracic duct Figs. 159 to 169.

Junction of preazygos segment of thoracic duct and bronchomediastinal trunk with each other and with the thoracic duct approach of the jugular lymph sac Figs. 170 to 187.

3. Azygos segment

A. Cleneral analysis of the development of the thoracic duct in the azygos region Figs. 188 to 193.

B. Detailed consideration of the individual stages in the development of the azygos segment of the thoracic duct Junction of azygos and preazygos segments of the thoracic duct Figs. 194 to 275.

Summary and conclusions of Part II

Bibliography

Introduction

I have recently published in a preliminary communication, a r6sum6 of the results obtained in an investigation of manmialian lymphatic development and organization extending over the past six years, and now, in its main chapters, concluded. The paper above quoted was presented, with demonstrations of slides, at the 25th session of the Association of American Anatomists held in Boston during Convocation week of 1910, and is intended as an attempt to definitely establish what I believe to be the genetic principle upon which all systemic lymphatic development in the mammalian embryo is based. In outline this matter was also presented and demonstrated to the Section of Anatomy and Embryology of the XVIth International Medical Congress held at Budapest, August-September, 1909, and published in the Proceedings of the Congress.


Owing to the character of the problem and its complexity, a detailed consideration of the same exceeds the reasonable limits of an article suitable for publication in our current anatomical periodicals, and the unavoidable number of microphotographic illustrations demanded makes publication through the ordinary channel still more unadvisable. For these reasons I have arranged, with the cooperation of The Wistar Institute of Anatomy, through Director Greenman, to publish the details of my observations on mammalian lymphatic ontogeny in the form of a series of monographs, in which the subject can be handled with less restraint than in one of the current publications. I have been led to the undertaking largely by my conviction of the value of the work which has been done within the last decade in this field by American investigators. The development of the lymphatic system is one of the very few broad morphological problems as yet incompletely solved, and I believe that the painstaking, able and conscientious work of the relatively large number of interested investigators of the subject in this country wUl eventually furnish a satisfactory answer to the question, as a national contribution to the advancement of anatomical science.


G. S. Huntington: "The Genetic Principles of the Development of the Systemic Lymphatic Vessels in the Mammalian Embryo." Anat, Record., vol. iv, no. 11, 1910, pp. 399 to 403, with 32 illustrations. (18 plates.)

G. S. Huntington: **Ueber die Entwicklung desLymphatisc hen Systems beim Sauger-Embryo." Compte-RendUf xvi. Congres International de Mddecine, Section 1, Anatomie, Embryologie, 2. Fascicule, pp. 127-142, Budapest, 1910.


I have been obliged to differ, on the basis of my own investigations, from the conclusions reached by most of my American colleagues. I hence welcome the opportunity of placing my results fully on record, in such a manner that they can be readily examined and verified, if correct, or refuted, if found to be erroneous. In carrying out this purpose it is of course necessary, in order to avoid repetition and economize space, to simply refer to those parts of the subject which have been already fully covered in the existing, publications, and to include these articles as part of the entire record. The main problem then is narrowed down to the developmental history of the mammalian systemic lymphatic channels, as distinguished from the jugular lymph sacs, or other homologous structures of like origin and equivalent functional significance, wherever situated.

The proposed series of publications will include the following topics in the order given:

Part I, The development of the systemic lymphatic vessels in their relation to the blood vascular system.

Part II. The development of the preazygos and azygos segments of the thoracic ducts.

Part III. The development of the visceral lymphatic drainage j and especially of the lymphatics of the abdominal cavity; the formation of the receptaculum, and of the postazygos segment of the thoracic ducts, as well as the lymphatic return from the pelvic and caudal regions and from the posterior extremity.

Part IV. The development of the main lymphatic trunks , other than the thoracic ducts y draining into the jugular lymph sacs, and ctirough them into the venous system, viz., the cervical, jugular and supra-scapular lymphatics, and their mediastinal connections, and the lymphatic return from the anterior extremity along the subclavian vein.

Part V. The interpretation of adult normal and variant lymphatic organization on the genetic basis, and the interdependence of the adult venous and lymphatic systems.

The present publication includes Parts I and II of the above list.


Huntington1911: Part I. The development of the systemic lymphatic vessels in their relation to the blood-vascular system | Part II. The development of the preazygos and azygos segments of the thoracic ducts | Bibliography


Huntington GS. The anatomy and development of the systemic lymphatic vessels in the domestic cat. (1911) Memoirs of the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology No. 1.


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2020, August 8) Embryology Paper - The anatomy and development of the systemic lymphatic vessels in the domestic cat. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Paper_-_The_anatomy_and_development_of_the_systemic_lymphatic_vessels_in_the_domestic_cat

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