Difference between revisions of "Human Abnormal Development"

From Embryology
(UNSW Embryology Links)
(UNSW Embryology Links)
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== UNSW Embryology Links ==
 
== UNSW Embryology Links ==
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page1.htm Abnormal Development]
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page1.htm Abnormal Development]
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page3.htm Abnormal Development- Australian Statistics]
+
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page3.htm Abnormal Development- Australian Statistics] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page4.htm Abnormalities by Systems]
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page4.htm Abnormalities by Systems]
 
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page7.htm Prenatal Diagnosis]
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page7.htm Prenatal Diagnosis]
 +
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/genetic.htm Genetic Abnormalities] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page21.htm Down Syndrome] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page18.htm Edwards Syndrome] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/fragilex.htm Fragile X] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/leschnyhan.htm Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome]
 +
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/maternal.htm Maternal Factors] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/maternaldiabetes.htm Maternal Diabetes] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/hyperthermia.htm Maternal Hyperthermia] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page5e.htm Neural Tube Defects] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page5a.htm Fetal Alcohol Syndrome] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/smoking.htm Smoking] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/chemical.htm Chemical] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/drugs.htm Drugs] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/drugs2.htm Illegal Drugs] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/radiation.htm Radiation] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/metal.htm Heavy Metal] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page11.htm Iodine Deficiency] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/virus.htm Viral Infection] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/rubella.htm Rubella] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/polio.htm Polio] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/parvovirus.htm Parvovirus] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/varicella.htm Varicella] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/bacteria.htm Bacterial Infection] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/malaria.htm Malaria] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/toxoplasmosis.htm Toxoplasmosis] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/autism.htm Autism]
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page10.htm Fetal Origins Hypothesis]
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page10.htm Fetal Origins Hypothesis]
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/IUGR.htm Intrauterine Growth Retardation]
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/IUGR.htm Intrauterine Growth Retardation]
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/twin.htm Twinning]
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/twin.htm Twinning]
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/genetic.htm Genetic Abnormalities] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page21.htm Down Syndrome] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page18.htm Edwards Syndrome] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/fragilex.htm Fragile X] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/leschnyhan.htm Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome]
 
* [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/maternal.htm Maternal Factors] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/maternaldiabetes.htm Maternal Diabetes] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/hyperthermia.htm Maternal Hyperthermia] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page5e.htm Neural Tube Defects] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page5a.htm Fetal Alcohol Syndrome] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/smoking.htm Smoking] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/chemical.htm Chemical] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/drugs.htm Drugs] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/drugs2.htm Illegal Drugs] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/radiation.htm Radiation] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/metal.htm Heavy Metal] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/page11.htm Iodine Deficiency] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/virus.htm Viral Infection] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/rubella.htm Rubella] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/polio.htm Polio] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/parvovirus.htm Parvovirus] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/varicella.htm Varicella] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/bacteria.htm Bacterial Infection] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/malaria.htm Malaria] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/toxoplasmosis.htm Toxoplasmosis] | [http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Defect/autism.htm Autism] |
 
  
 
== External Links ==
 
== External Links ==

Revision as of 17:13, 12 August 2009

Australian Data 1981-92

A page introducing developmental abnormalities in humans.


Statistics - Top Ten

The ten most frequently reported birth defects in Victoria between 2003-2004 (More? Australian Statistics - Victoria)

  1. Hypospadias
  2. Obstructive Defects of the Renal Pelvis
  3. Ventricular Septal Defect
  4. Congenital Dislocated Hip
  5. Trisomy 21 or Down syndrome
  6. Hydrocephalus
  7. Cleft Palate
  8. Trisomy 18 or Edward Syndrome - multiple abnormalities of the heart, diaphragm, lungs, kidneys, ureters and palate 86% discontinued.
  9. Renal Agenesis/Dysgenesis - reduction in neonatal death and stillbirth since 1993 may be due to the more severe cases being identified in utero and being represented amongst the increased proportion of terminations (approximately 31%).
  10. Cleft Lip and Palate - occur with another defect in 33.7% of cases.


Australian Birth Anomalies System

"The national collation and reporting of birth anomalies data has been suspended in recent years due to concerns about data quality and comparability."
  • Variability among states and territories in scope of birth anomalies data collections
    • sources of birth anomalies notifications
    • definitions and classifications used
    • method of data collection
    • available resources
  • Variability among the states and territories in the timing and method of the provision of birth anomalies data to the AIHW National Perinatal Statistics Unit (NPSU) for national collation and reporting.
  • New Australian Birth Anomalies System should be data for birth anomalies detected up to 1 year of age
    • including data on terminations of pregnancies with birth anomalies
    • regardless of gestational age (i.e. including less than 20 weeks gestation)
  • System will initially be based on data from the states able to detect birth anomalies at least up to 1 year of age
    • NSW, VIC, WA and SA
    • further extending the period of detection in the future

(Reference: modified from Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW))


Teratology

Now consider how different environmental effects during pregnancy may influence developmental outcomes. The terms listed below are often used to describe these environmental effects

  • Teratogen (Greek, teraton = monster) any agent that causes a structural abnormality (congenital abnormalities) following fetal exposure during pregnancy. The overall effect depends on dosage and time of exposure. (More? Critical Periods of Development)
  • Absolute risk the rate of occurrence of an abnormal phenotype among individuals exposed to the agent. (e.g. fetal alcohol syndrome)
  • Relative risk the ratio of the rate of the condition among the exposed and the nonexposed. (e.g. smokers risk of having a low birth weight baby compared to non-smokers) A high relative risk may indicate a low absolute risk if the condition is rare.
  • Mutagen a chemical or agent that can cause permanent damage to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a cell. DNA damage in the human egg or sperm may lead to reduced fertility, spontaneous abortion (miscarriage), birth defects and heritable diseases.
  • Fetotoxicant is a chemical that adversely affects the developing fetus, resulting in low birth weight, symptoms of poisoning at birth or stillbirth (fetus dies before it is born).
  • Synergism when the combined effect of exposure to more than one chemical at one time, or to a chemical in combination with other hazards (heat, radiation, infection) results in effects of such exposure to be greater than the sum of the individual effects of each hazard by itself.
  • Toxicogenomics the interaction between the genome, chemicals in the environment, and disease. Cells exposed to a stress, drug or toxicant respond by altering the pattern of expression of genes within their chromosomes. Based on new genetic and microarray technologies.

UNSW Embryology Links

External Links

Glossary Links

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Dr Mark Hill 2009, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G