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Plate 4. Photographs of the auricle of the human fetus during the third month

The photographs on plate 4 are specimens from the third month of intrauterine life. The first two (figs. 28 and 29) overlap the oldest stage shown on plate 3; most of the parts of the auricle can here be clearly recognized, although they are still very simple in form. Derived from the mandibular bar are the tragus and the crus helicis; as derived from the hyoid bar, one can recognize the anti tragus and the ridge-like primitive ear-fold or scapha-helix. The incisura intertragica, at the entrance of the concha, still bears a resemblance to the hyoid cleft from which it was derived. The concha does not acquire its concave, shell-like character until later in development, due to the relatively thick and swollen character of the surrounding parts. Figures 30 to 32 differ from the preceding ones only in the increasing prominence of the ear-fold. At this time there is very little surface evidence of the anthelix as distinct from the scapha-helix. However, if sections through this region are examined microscopically, it will be found that the cartilaginous auricle is already characteristically folded into a helix, scapha, anthelix, and concha, the free edge of the helix coming into close contact with the surface of the auricle.

All being taken at an enlargement of 10 diameters. In some cases the right ear was selected and reversed for convenience in comparison.

These are indicated by the letter R. All specimens are from the Carnegie Collection, and length given is crown-rump.



In-text Figures: Figure 1 and 2 | Figure 3 and 4 | Figure 5 | Figure 6 and 7 | Figure 8 | Text | Glossary
Plates: Plate 1 | Plate 2 | Plate 3 | Plate 4 | Plate 5 | Plate 6 | Plates | Glossary
Figures: 1. Auricle cartilage | 2. External ear | 3. Agnathia | 4. Agnathia+cyclopia | 6. Auricular cartilage embryo 21, 32 and 43 mm | 7. Auricular cartilage 50 mm fetus | 9. Embryo 6 mm | 10. Embryo 12 mm | 11. Embryo 14 mm | 12. Embryo 18 mm | 13. Embryo 1380, 5 mm | 14. Embryo 1767, 11 mm | 15. Embryo 1461, 10 mm | 16. Embryo 562, 13 mm | 17. Embryo 1232, 14 mm | 18. Embryo 475, 15 mm | 19. Embryo 899, 13 mm | 20. Embryo 434, 15 mm | 21. Embryo 492, 16.8 mm | 22. Embryo 576, 17 mm | 23. Embryo 547, 18 mm | 24. Embryo 955, 17 mm | 25. Embryo 1584, 18 mm | 26. Embryo 1134e, 21.3 mm | 27. Embryo 1358b, 33.2 mm | 28. Embryo 1535, 28 mm | 29. Embryo 2163, 36 mm | 30. Embryo 1980, 37 mm | 31. Embryo 1840a, 38.5 mm | 32. Embryo 2075, 40 mm | 33. Embryo 2144, 45.5 mm | 34. Embryo 642, 49 mm | 35. Embryo 2170, 50 mm | 36. Embryo 2095, 52 mm | 37. Embryo 2095, 52 mm | 38. Embryo 2066, 53 mm | 39. Embryo 2079, 56.5 mm. | 40. Embryo 1561, 57 mm | 41. Embryo 218, 62.5 mm. (R.) | 42. Embryo 1724, 66.2 mm | 43. Embryo 2328, 65 mm | 44. Embryo 2118, 69 mm | 45. Embryo 981, 85 mm | 46. Embryo 1845, 87 mm | 47. Embryo 1449, 87.3 mm | 48. Embryo 2003, 103.5 mm | 49. Embryo 1858, 100 mm | 50. Embryo 2274, 113 mm | 51. Embryo 2185, 113.5 mm. | 52. Embryo 9526, 114 mm. | 53. Embryo 1811, 114 mm | 54. Embryo 1716, 119 mm. Fig. 59. 1742, 191.2 mm | 55. Embryo 19576, 119 mm. | 56. Embryo 1782, 135.6 mm | 57. Embryo 1702, 150 mm | 58. Embryo 1708, 154 mm | 59. Embryo 1742, 191.2 mm | Figures


Related Notes: Outer Ear Development | Carnegie Contributions to Embryology

Reference

Streeter GL. Development of the auricle in the human embryo. (1922) Carnegie Instn. Wash. Publ. 277, Contrib. Embryol., 14: 111-138.



Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2024, June 24) Embryology Streeter1922-fig38.jpg. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/File:Streeter1922-fig38.jpg

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current01:12, 28 January 2013Thumbnail for version as of 01:12, 28 January 2013560 × 687 (69 KB)Z8600021 (talk | contribs)==Plate 4. Photographs of the auricle of the human fetus during the third month== The photographs on plate 4 are specimens from the third month of intrauterine life. The first two (figs. 28 and 29) overlap the oldest stage shown on plate 3; most of the p