Difference between revisions of "File:Rabbit clone.jpg"

From Embryology
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Rabbits cloned from somatic cell by nucleus transfer
 
  
Image can be used so long as you agree and abide by the conditions below as this is a article made freely available to all without any access restrictions.
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'''Summary'''
  
Original article:
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A) Cloned rabbits (5 month old) from nuclear transfer technique. (B) The male rabbit whose fibroblast cells were used as the nuclear donors. The cloned rabbits have almost identical genome to the male donor.
http://www.reproduction-online.org/cgi/reprint/131/6/1085
 
  
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'''Original article:''' The Society for Reproduction and Fertility
  
 
Rabbits generated from fibroblasts through nuclear transfer
 
Rabbits generated from fibroblasts through nuclear transfer
Shangang Li1, Xuejin Chen1, Zhenfu Fang1, Jianjun Shi2 and Hui Z Sheng1,2
 
  
1Center for Developmental Biology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine and
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Shangang Li1, Xuejin Chen1, Zhenfu Fang, Jianjun Shi and Hui Z Sheng
  
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''1Center for Developmental Biology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine and
 
2Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological
 
2Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological
Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200092, P. R. China
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Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200092, P. R. China''
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'''URL:''' http://www.reproduction-online.org/cgi/reprint/131/6/1085
  
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'''Copyright'''
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Image can be used so long as you agree and abide by the conditions below as this is a article made freely available to all without any access restrictions. It allows the image to be used under conditions of fair use.
  
  
 
Terms of use
 
Terms of use
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Revision as of 19:16, 11 October 2009

Summary

A) Cloned rabbits (5 month old) from nuclear transfer technique. (B) The male rabbit whose fibroblast cells were used as the nuclear donors. The cloned rabbits have almost identical genome to the male donor.


Original article: The Society for Reproduction and Fertility

Rabbits generated from fibroblasts through nuclear transfer

Shangang Li1, Xuejin Chen1, Zhenfu Fang, Jianjun Shi and Hui Z Sheng

1Center for Developmental Biology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine and 2Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200092, P. R. China


URL: http://www.reproduction-online.org/cgi/reprint/131/6/1085



Copyright


Image can be used so long as you agree and abide by the conditions below as this is a article made freely available to all without any access restrictions. It allows the image to be used under conditions of fair use.


Terms of use

The person using Reproduction online may view, reproduce or store copies of articles comprising the journal provided that the articles are used only for their personal, non-commercial use. Uses beyond that allowed by the "Fair Use" limitations (sections 107 and 108) of the US Copyright law require permission of the publisher.

Some articles have been made freely available to all without any access restrictions, either on this site, on PubMed Central, or elsewhere. These articles (the ‘Free Content’) are marked as ‘Free’ in the table of contents and on the abstract page. Readers may freely save and transmit copies of the free content for the non-commercial purposes of research, scholarship and education, subject to the following conditions:


Fair Use Fair use is one of the exceptions in copyright which allows use of copyrighted materials without obtaining permission as long as the use can be considered fair. There is a four-factor analysis which must be applied to each use to determine whether the use is fair. Each factor is given equal weight. The goal is to achieve a balance between the rights of the copyright holder with the rights of the public. Fair use is also technologically neutral so the same analysis may be applied to any medium.

Fair use allows limited duplication and use of copyrighted works without the permission of the owner for certain teaching and research purposes. The 1976 Copyright Act grants the "fair use" of copyrighted materials for a variety of purposes, for the creation of new works, for educational use, and for personal use.

Fair use applies to all copyrighted works regardless of the media in which they are fixed: print, electronic, or multimedia.

Fair use normally entails copying and is of three kinds:

• Creative fair use by authors who copy from other works to create their own work.

• Personal fair use by individuals who copy from works for their own learning or entertainment.

• Educational fair use by teachers, scholars, and students who copy for teaching, scholarship, or learning.

Fair use is determined on a case-by-case basis. To determine if a use is fair, consider the following:

• Is the proposed use non-commercial? Commercial uses are not fair use and require permission from the copyright holder.

• Is the work original to the author, or is itself a compilation of other works? If it is a compilation, fair use must be determined for each original work separately.

• How much of the work are you planning to use? The greater the amount of the work used, the more likely permission will be required. It is not permissible to copy entire books or articles without permission, since the more of a given work you use, the more you affect the market for it.

• What is the effect of your use on the market for the work? The greater the market effect, the less likely fair use will apply.

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current04:28, 23 September 2009Thumbnail for version as of 04:28, 23 September 2009672 × 224 (39 KB)Z3187802 (talk | contribs)Rabbits cloned from somatic cell by nucleus transfer

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