Difference between revisions of "File:Autosomal dominant inheritance.jpg"

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Autosomal Dominant Disease
 
Autosomal Dominant Disease
* Huntington’s Disease (HD) - neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive motor abnormality and cognitive deterioration. (More? [[2011_Group_Project_4|Student Project]]
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* Huntington’s Disease (HD) - neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive motor abnormality and cognitive deterioration. (More? [[2011_Group_Project_4|Student Project]])
  
  

Revision as of 13:55, 1 November 2014

Autosomal dominant inheritance

In this example, a man with an autosomal dominant disorder has two affected children and two unaffected children.

Autosomal Dominant Disease

  • Huntington’s Disease (HD) - neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive motor abnormality and cognitive deterioration. (More? Student Project)


Inheritance Pattern images: Genetic Abnormalities | autosomal dominant | autosomal recessive | X-linked dominant (affected father) | X-Linked dominant (affected mother) | X-Linked recessive (affected father) | X-Linked recessive (carrier mother) | mitochondrial inheritance | Codominant inheritance | Genogram symbols | Genetics

Links: Spermatozoa | Oocyte | Search Pubmed - autosomal inheritance


Reference

Genetics Home Reference. http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/illustrations/autodominant

Copyright

Government information at NLM Web sites is in the public domain. Public domain information may be freely distributed and copied, but it is requested that in any subsequent use the National Library of Medicine (NLM) be given appropriate acknowledgement. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/copyright.html

File history

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Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current09:40, 12 May 2010Thumbnail for version as of 09:40, 12 May 2010307 × 396 (64 KB)S8600021 (talk | contribs)Autosomal dominant inheritance In this example, a man with an autosomal dominant disorder has two affected children and two unaffected children. Source: Genetics Home Reference. http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/illustrations/autodominant Government info