Difference between revisions of "Embryology History - Santiago Ramón y Cajal"

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(CB) Ramon y Cajal originally identified these small (20-25 nm) nuclear membraneless organelles in cells, they have various suggested functions and are localized to the nucleolar periphery or within the nucleoli. They contain both newly assembled small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, for pre-mRNA splicing) and small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs, for ribosomal RNA processing) particles.
 
(CB) Ramon y Cajal originally identified these small (20-25 nm) nuclear membraneless organelles in cells, they have various suggested functions and are localized to the nucleolar periphery or within the nucleoli. They contain both newly assembled small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, for pre-mRNA splicing) and small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs, for ribosomal RNA processing) particles.
  
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See also the review.<ref name=PMID14685175><pubmed>14685175</pubmed></ref>
  
  

Revision as of 13:03, 13 August 2014

Introduction

Santiago Ramon y Cahal (photograph)
Historic retina drawing

Santiago Ramon y Cahal (1852 - 1934) and Camillo Golgi (1843 - 1926) jointly received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1906 "in recognition of their work on the structure of the nervous system."


Links: 1899 Human Sensory Cortex 1904 - A Brief History of Science | Retina | History - Early 20th Century | Category:Cajal


From the 1990 Science book review.[1]

"The neuroanatomist Santiago Ramon y Cahal might be considered something of a pioneer in the autobiographical genre, his straightforwardly titled Recuerdos de Mi Vida having appeared, in two volumes, in 1901 and 1907. The work was translated into English in 1937 and published as volume 8 of the Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society, itself now a long-standing sponsor of such works."

Santiago Ramon y Cahal in laboratory.jpg

Santiago Ramon y Cahal in laboratory portrait.


Historic Drawings


Cajal bodies

Nucleus Cajal bodies image
Cajal bodies[2]

(CB) Ramon y Cajal originally identified these small (20-25 nm) nuclear membraneless organelles in cells, they have various suggested functions and are localized to the nucleolar periphery or within the nucleoli. They contain both newly assembled small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, for pre-mRNA splicing) and small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs, for ribosomal RNA processing) particles.


See also the review.[3]


References

  1. <pubmed>17735292</pubmed>| Book Review
  2. <pubmed>12379800</pubmed>| PMC2173504 | J Cell Biol.
  3. <pubmed>14685175</pubmed>


<pubmed>14944970</pubmed>

Search Pubmed

Search Pubmed: Ramon y Cahal

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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, October 17) Embryology Embryology History - Santiago Ramón y Cajal. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Embryology_History_-_Santiago_Ram%C3%B3n_y_Cajal

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© Dr Mark Hill 2019, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G