Category:Carnegie Embryo 95

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This Embryology category shows pages and images that relate to the Carnegie Collection Embryo No. 95. This embryo would be early fetal development Week 10 based upon the CRL 50 mm.


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Historic Embryology  
1940 Fetus Physiology
Carnegie Fetal: 95 | 96 | 142 | 145 | 184 | 211 | 217 | 300 | 362 | 448 | 449 | 538 | 590 | 607 | 625 | 662 | 693 | 847 | 858 | 922 | 928 | 948 | 972 | 1318 | 1388 | 1455 | 1591 | 1597b | 1656 | 1686 | 2250a | 2250b | 3990 | 5652 | 6581 | 7218


Carnegie Collection - Fetal  
Serial No. Size CRL (mm) Grade Fixative Embedding Medium Plane Thinness (µm) Stain Point Score Sex Year Notes
95 40 catalogued as CRL 40 but development suggests 50 stage. Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1] Colon - Lineback (1920)[2]
96 50 Brain venous sinuses - Streeter (1915)[3] Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1] Brain vascular - Streeter (1921)[4] Brain weight - Jenkins (1921)[5]
142 125 Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
145 33 Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
184 50 34 vertebrae, 31 spinal ganglia, Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
211 33 34 vertebra, 31 spinal ganglia, Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
217 45 Male Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
300 73 85 days, Bone ossification - Mall (1906)[7]
362 30 Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
448 52 Colon - Lineback (1920)[2]
449 36 Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
538
590 21 to 23 Male Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
607 37 Male Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
625 220 Temporomandibular joint - Moffatt (1957)[8]
662 80 Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
693 45 Male Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
847 58.8 Male Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
858 57.25 Temporomandibular joint - Moffatt (1957)[8]
922 37
928 120 Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
948 45 Male Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
972 37 34 vertebrae, 30 spinal ganglia, Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
1318 37 Temporomandibular joint - Moffatt (1957)[8]
1388 51 Female Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
1455 78.5 Temporomandibular joint - Moffatt (1957)[8]
1591 36 subcutaneous vascular plexus - Finley (1923)[9]
1656 67 34 vertebrae, Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[1]
1686 40 Male Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
3990 49 Temporomandibular joint - Moffatt (1957)[8]
4473 43 20 Spinal cord meninges - Sensenig (1951)[10]
4475 48 20 Spinal cord meninges - Sensenig (1951)[10]
5652 49 Temporomandibular joint - Moffatt (1957)[8]
6581 75 Temporomandibular joint - Moffatt (1957)[8]
7218 80 20 um Spinal cord meninges - Sensenig (1951)[10]
1597b 47 Female Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
2250a 40 Female Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
2250b 36 Female Genital - Spaulding (1921)[6]
This table currently contains only has embryo number information.

Abbreviations

  • Size - E. is the greatest length of the embryo and Ch. is the mean diameter of the chorion.
  • Grade - total grade of the specimen and includes both its original quality and the condition of the mounted sections.
  • Embedding medium - paraffin (P) or a combination of celloidin and paraffin (C-P).
  • Fixative - formalin (Formol), alcohol and formalin (Alc, formol), Bouin (Bouin solution)
  • Stain -
  •  ? - unknown or not determined.
References
  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 Kunitomo K. The development and reduction of the tail and of the caudal end of the spinal cord (1920) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 272, 9: 163-198.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Lineback PE. Studies on the longitudinal muscle of the human colon, with special reference to the development of the taeniae. (1920) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 50
  3. Streeter GL. The development of the venous sinuses of the dura mater in the human embryo. (1915) Amer. J Anat.18: 145-178.
  4. Streeter GL. The developmental alterations in the vascular system of the brain of the human embryo. (1921) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. 8:7-38.
  5. Jenkins GB. Relative weight and volume of the component parts of the brain of the human embryo at different stages of development. (1921) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash., 59: 5-54.
  6. 6.00 6.01 6.02 6.03 6.04 6.05 6.06 6.07 6.08 6.09 6.10 Spaulding MH. The development of the external genitalia in the human embryo. (1921) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 81, 13: 69 – 88.
  7. Mall FP. On ossification centers in human embryos less than one hundred days old. (1906) Amer. J Anat. 5:433-458.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 Moffatt BC. The prenatal development of the human temporomandibular joint. (1957) Carnegie Instn. Wash. Publ. 611, Contrib. Embryol., 36: .
  9. Finley EB. The development of the subcutaneous vascular plexus in the head of the human embryo. (1923) Contributions to Embryology Carnegie Institution No.71; 155-161.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Sensenig EC. The early development of the meninges of the spinal cord in human embryos. (1951) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 611,
Fertilization and Gestational Age - Crown-Rump Length (ultrasound
Fertilization Age
(days)
Gestational Age
GA (week.day)
Crown-Rump
Length (mm)
37 5.2 1
38 5.3 2
39 5.4 3
40 55 3
41 5.6 4
42    Week 4 6 4
43 6.1 5
44 6.2 6
45 6.3 7
46 6.4 8
47 6.5 9
48 6.6 10
49    Week 5 7 11
50 7.1 11
51 7.2 12
52 7.3 12
53 7.4 13
54 7.5 14
55 7.6 15
56    Week 6 8 17
57 8.1 18
58 8.2 19
59 8.3 20
60 8.4 21
61 8.5 22
62 8.6 22
63    Week 7 9 23
64 9.1 24
65 9.2 26
66 9.3 27
67 9.4 28
68 9.5 29
69 9.6 31
70    Week 8 10 34
71 10.1 36
72 10.2 37
73 10.3 38
74 10.4 39
75 10.5 39
76 10.6 40
77    Week 9 11 44
78 11.1 45
79 11.2 47
80 11.3 48
81 11.4 52
82 11.5 55
83 11.6 56
84    Week 10 12 57
85 12.1 58
86 12.2 60
87 12.3 61
88 12.4 63
89 12.5 64
90 12.6 65
91    Week 11 13 68
92 13.1 70
93 13.2 72
94 13.3 74
95 113.4 76
96 135 77
97 13.6 80
98    Week 12 14 81
99 14.1 84
100 14.2 85
101 14.3 86
102 14.4 87
Reference: Table data measured by ultrasound, adapted from Westerway (2015) PDF and[1]
Links: ultrasound | Fetal Development


  • Spinal cord - Kunitomo (1920)[2]
  • Colon - Lineback (1920)[3]

References

  1. Westerway SC, Davison A & Cowell S. (2000). Ultrasonic fetal measurements: new Australian standards for the new millennium. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol , 40, 297-302. PMID: 11065037
  2. Kunitomo K. The development and reduction of the tail and of the caudal end of the spinal cord (1920) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 272, 9: 163-198.
  3. Lineback PE. Studies on the longitudinal muscle of the human colon, with special reference to the development of the taeniae. (1920) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 50


Embryo No. 95, 50 mm Crown-Rump Length

Kunitomo K. The development and reduction of the tail and of the caudal end of the spinal cord (1920) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 272, 9: 163-198.

Although embryo No. 95 is recorded in the catalogue of the Carnegie Collection as 40 mm crown-rump length, its state of development more nearly corresponds with a 50 mm. embryo, and on this account I have used the latter measurement in the heading. This specimen has 35 vertebrae. The last one is very small and partly fused with the one above it. The column presents a ventral bend at the thirty-first vertebra, giving the typical coccygeal curve. The chorda dorsalis is disappearing in certain areas in the vertebral bodies as far down as the thirtieth vertebra, but in each intervertebral space a fragment remains. Caudal to the thirtieth vertebra the condition of the chorda remains the same as in the younger specimens, and in the thirty-second it gives off a short dorsal branch. The caudal end is more simple in form than in the younger stages, but I am inclined to believe that at an earlier stage it too was winding, as one can see in the thirty-fifth vertebra a few detached globules which probably at an earlier stage were continuous with the chorda and with it formed a terminal loop.

At the caudal end of the spinal cord are two groups of cells connected by a cell-strand. The more caudal one is situated dorsal to the thirty-fourth and thirty-fifth vertebra*; it is somewhat larger than the other, is oblong in form and incloses an oval cavity - a fragment of the central canal of the spinal cord. The other group of cells is situated dorsal to the thirty-second and thirty-third vertebra* and incloses a long, narrow cavity. The ventriculus terminalis extends the length of two vertebrae - the twenty-ninth and thirtieth. At this stage it has acquired its adult form. In none of the earlier specimens have I noted it so perfectly developed, although embryos No. 449, 30 mm., and No. 199, 35 mm., show a cavity at the caudal end of the central canal as the ])rimordium of the ventriculus. In this specimen the structure is cylindrical in shape, has six walls, and measures 0.87 mm long, 0.23 mm. deep, and 0.52 mm. wide. The ventral wall is concave, the dorsal convex, the sides slightly concave. The upper wall or ceiling is irregular and at the front presents a long, narrow diverticulum directed cranio-ventral. Behind this diverticulum is a narrow channel which connects the ventriculus terminalis and the central canal of the spinal cord. The ventriculus terminalis is embedded in the nerve-fibers of the cord. The filum terminale extends from the caudal end of the conus meduUaris, at the level of the thirty-first vertebra, to a point between the thirly-third and thirty-fourth vertebrae close to the column. It is covered by a membrane of the spinal cord and passes through the ventral side of the cell groups at the caudal end of the medullary tube. The pia mater covers closely the whole surface of the spinal cord; it contains blood capillaries, and is visible at the conus meduUaris. The dura mater, which envelops loosely the pia mater, adheres to the wall of the vertebral canal as far as the midlevel of the thirty-first vertebra, at which point it leaves the wall and unites with the caudal end of the conus medullaris. This portion constitutes the primordium of the bursa durge matris. After the dura mater reaches the conus medullaris it envelops the pia mater quite closely, both following a caudal course and forming a sheath for the filum terminale. The point at which these membranes terminate can not be definitely decided. It is probable that the pia mater extends nearly to the end of the filum terminale between the thirty-third and thirty-fourth vertebrae. The fibers of the dura mater appear to enter into the caudal and dorsal portions of the last vertebra.


Longitudinal muscle of the human colon

Lineback PE. Studies on the longitudinal muscle of the human colon, with special reference to the development of the taeniae. (1920) Contrib. Embryol., Carnegie Inst. Wash. Publ. 50

A 46-mm fetus, No. 95 C. C. (fig. 2), shows the whole muscle grown a little farther upward and its dorsal fibers extending well into the sigmoid region; no well-defined fibers can be detected in any of the regions higher up. In a 50 mm fetus there is a distinct layer at the mesenteric attachment, the continuation of the dorsal fibers of the 46 mm stage. The layer is well defined and extends throughout the length of the colon. Lewis noted this muscle and stated that in a 75-mm. fetus it was seen along the transverse colon, although he made no mention of it in other parts of the bowel.



Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, October 19) Embryology Carnegie Embryo 95. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Category:Carnegie_Embryo_95

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© Dr Mark Hill 2019, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G

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