Difference between revisions of "Book - Evolution and Genetics"

From Embryology
m
m
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{Morgan1925 header}}
 
{{Morgan1925 header}}
 
[[File:Morgan1925.jpg|thumb|300px|Evolution and Genetics (1925]]
 
[[File:Morgan1925.jpg|thumb|300px|Evolution and Genetics (1925]]
{{Historic Disclaimer}}
 
  
 +
EVOLUTION AND GENETICS
 +
 +
 +
 +
London: Humphrey Milford
 +
Oxford University Press
 +
 +
 +
 +
EVOLUTION AND
 +
GENETICS
 +
 +
 +
 +
BY
 +
THOMAS HUNT MORGAN
 +
 +
PROFESSOR OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY
 +
IN COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
PRINCETON
 +
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS
 +
 +
1925
 +
 +
Based on lectures delivered at Princeton University
 +
 +
Under the Louis Clark Vanuxem Foundation
 +
 +
February 24, March 1, 8, 15, 1916
 +
 +
Copyright, 1916, By Princeton University Press
 +
 +
Published October, 1916, As "A Critique Of The Theory Of Evolution"
 +
 +
Second Printing, September, 1917
 +
 +
Third Revised Printing, February, 1919
 +
 +
Copyright, 1925, By Princeton University Press
 +
 +
Second Edition, September, 1925
 +
 +
==Preface==
 +
THE third reprinting of the Vanuxem Lectures for 1915-16, entitled A Critique of the Theory of Evolution, having been exhausted, the publishers have asked for a revised edition. The revision is no less an attempt at a critique of the evolution theory than its predecessor, but, as the change in title suggests, greater attention is here paid to one of the most debated questions among evolutionists today, namely, the bearing of the recent discoveries in genetics and in mutation on the theory of evolution.
 +
 +
While in a general way Darwin's theory of Natural Selection is independent of the origin of the new variations that furnish it with its materials, yet the scientific formulation of the theory is intimately connected with the origin and inheritance of suitable variations. For instance, if most of the observed variability of animals and plants were due directly to the environment, and if the effects thus brought about were not inherited, such variability could no longer be appealed to as material for natural selection.
 +
 +
Again, if the variations that appear as mutants are always defective types, they could not, even though they are inherited, be appealed to as furnishing material for progressive evolution.
 +
 +
A discussion of these two problems in their historical setting is one of the principal themes treated in the following pages.
 +
 +
The four original lectures (chapters) have been subdivided and enlarged into thirteen chapters. Two of these are entirely new, one dealing with the noninheritance of acquired characters ( copied with slight changes from the Yale Review for July 1924), the other a criticism of the evidence of human inheritance. The somewhat acrimonious discussion taking
 +
place at the present time concerning racial differences in man, a discussion in which "nature" and "nurture" are often confused, mav furnish an excuse for the addition of this final chapter.
 +
 +
T. H. MORGAN
 +
 +
March 1925
 +
 +
==Figures==
 
<gallery>
 
<gallery>
 
File:Morgan_1925_fig04.jpg|Fig. 4. Arm of chimpanzee and of man
 
File:Morgan_1925_fig04.jpg|Fig. 4. Arm of chimpanzee and of man

Revision as of 17:24, 16 October 2014

Morgan (1925) Evolution and Genetics: 1 Different Kinds of Evolution | 2 Four Great Historical Speculations | 3 Evidence for Organic Evolution | 4 Materials of Evolution | 5 Mendel's Two Laws of Heredity | 6 Chromosomes and Mendel’s Two Laws | 7 Linkage Groups and the Chromosomes | 8 Sex-Linked Inheritance | 9 Crossing-over | 10 Natural Selection and Evolution | 11 Origin of Species by Natural Selection | 12 Non-Inheritance of Acquired Characters | 13 Human Inheritance | Figures

Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
Evolution and Genetics (1925

EVOLUTION AND GENETICS


London: Humphrey Milford Oxford University Press


EVOLUTION AND GENETICS


BY THOMAS HUNT MORGAN

PROFESSOR OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY IN COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY



PRINCETON PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS

1925

Based on lectures delivered at Princeton University

Under the Louis Clark Vanuxem Foundation

February 24, March 1, 8, 15, 1916

Copyright, 1916, By Princeton University Press

Published October, 1916, As "A Critique Of The Theory Of Evolution"

Second Printing, September, 1917

Third Revised Printing, February, 1919

Copyright, 1925, By Princeton University Press

Second Edition, September, 1925

Preface

THE third reprinting of the Vanuxem Lectures for 1915-16, entitled A Critique of the Theory of Evolution, having been exhausted, the publishers have asked for a revised edition. The revision is no less an attempt at a critique of the evolution theory than its predecessor, but, as the change in title suggests, greater attention is here paid to one of the most debated questions among evolutionists today, namely, the bearing of the recent discoveries in genetics and in mutation on the theory of evolution.

While in a general way Darwin's theory of Natural Selection is independent of the origin of the new variations that furnish it with its materials, yet the scientific formulation of the theory is intimately connected with the origin and inheritance of suitable variations. For instance, if most of the observed variability of animals and plants were due directly to the environment, and if the effects thus brought about were not inherited, such variability could no longer be appealed to as material for natural selection.

Again, if the variations that appear as mutants are always defective types, they could not, even though they are inherited, be appealed to as furnishing material for progressive evolution.

A discussion of these two problems in their historical setting is one of the principal themes treated in the following pages.

The four original lectures (chapters) have been subdivided and enlarged into thirteen chapters. Two of these are entirely new, one dealing with the noninheritance of acquired characters ( copied with slight changes from the Yale Review for July 1924), the other a criticism of the evidence of human inheritance. The somewhat acrimonious discussion taking place at the present time concerning racial differences in man, a discussion in which "nature" and "nurture" are often confused, mav furnish an excuse for the addition of this final chapter.

T. H. MORGAN

March 1925

Figures

Reference

Morgan, T. H. (1925). Evolution and genetics. Princeton: Princeton University Press.


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Morgan (1925) Evolution and Genetics: 1 Different Kinds of Evolution | 2 Four Great Historical Speculations | 3 Evidence for Organic Evolution | 4 Materials of Evolution | 5 Mendel's Two Laws of Heredity | 6 Chromosomes and Mendel’s Two Laws | 7 Linkage Groups and the Chromosomes | 8 Sex-Linked Inheritance | 9 Crossing-over | 10 Natural Selection and Evolution | 11 Origin of Species by Natural Selection | 12 Non-Inheritance of Acquired Characters | 13 Human Inheritance | Figures