Difference between revisions of "Book - An Atlas of the Medulla and Midbrain"

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{{Sabin1901 header}}
 
{{Sabin1901 header}}
 
+
=An Atlas Of The Medulla And Midbrain=
 
+
[[File:Sabin1901 titlepage.jpg|right|400px]]
'''AN ATLAS OF THE MEDULLA AND MIDBRAIN'''
+
[[File:Florence Sabin 1938.jpg|thumb|alt=Florence Rena Sabin (1871 - 1953)|link=Embryology History - Florence Sabin|Florence Rena Sabin (1871-1953)]]
 
 
 
By [[Embryology History - Florence Sabin|Florence R. Sabin]]  
 
By [[Embryology History - Florence Sabin|Florence R. Sabin]]  
  
  
  
A LABORATORY MANUAL
+
A Laboratory Manual
  
ILLUSTRATED WITH SEVEN COLORED PLATES, ONE BLACK PLATE AND FIFTY-TWO FIGURES
+
Illustrated With Seven Colored Plates, One Black Plate And Fifty-Two Figures
  
  
EDITED BY
+
Edited By
  
  
Line 22: Line 21:
  
  
BALTIMORE, MD., U. S. A.  
+
Baltimore, Md., U. S. A.  
  
THE FRIEDENWALD COMPANY
+
The Friedenwald Company
  
PUBLISHERS
+
Publishers
  
 
1901  
 
1901  
Line 32: Line 31:
  
  
COPYRIGHT, 1901,  
+
Copyright, 1901,  
BY FLORENCE R. SABIN
+
By Florence R. Sabin
  
  
THE FRIEDENWALD COMPANY
+
The Friedenwald Company
BALTIMORE, MD M U. S. A.  
+
Baltimore, Md M U. S. A.  
  
 
{{Historic Disclaimer}}
 
{{Historic Disclaimer}}
Line 43: Line 42:
 
==Editor's Preface==
 
==Editor's Preface==
  
This Atlas is planned to meet the practical need of some quick and simple, yet full and reliable, means of aiding the student to  
+
This Atlas is planned to meet the practical need of some quick and simple, yet full and reliable, means of aiding the student to obtain, from a few sections (or from a series of sections), a reasonably clear idea of the important central relay-station of the brain  
obtain, from a few sections (or from a series of sections), a reasonably clear idea of the important central relay-station of the brain  
+
here presented. (Though representing the human brain, the atlas can be applied to the study of the brains of lower mammals.)  
here presented. (Though representing the human brain, the atlas  
+
 
can be applied to the study of the brains of lower mammals.)  
 
  
The time allotted to a course in Neurology is generally so short;  
+
The time allotted to a course in Neurology is generally so short; the sections to be studied exhibit such great special complexity of  
the sections to be studied exhibit such great special complexity of  
 
 
structure, due to the presence and association of many different  
 
structure, due to the presence and association of many different  
 
centres in the narrow limits of the region; and the descriptions in  
 
centres in the narrow limits of the region; and the descriptions in  
Line 56: Line 53:
 
shown in their preparations, without spending more time in the  
 
shown in their preparations, without spending more time in the  
 
effort than is reasonable.  
 
effort than is reasonable.  
 +
  
 
We believe, and a number of well-known teachers in several of  
 
We believe, and a number of well-known teachers in several of  
Line 62: Line 60:
 
stated above; and will save the student much time for real study,  
 
stated above; and will save the student much time for real study,  
 
now often spent in getting started.  
 
now often spent in getting started.  
 +
  
 
Supplied with these excellent drawings of the reconstruction, showing for the first time accurately and satisfactorily structures  
 
Supplied with these excellent drawings of the reconstruction, showing for the first time accurately and satisfactorily structures  
to be studied, the student can quickly compare his own sections  
+
to be studied, the student can quickly compare his own sections with the figures of the Atlas and find the parts there clearly  
with the figures of the Atlas and find the parts there clearly  
 
 
designated and explained.  
 
designated and explained.  
  
Again, if, as is usually the case, a student has only a few cross
+
 
-J-Tiio -narnrvn + Vi a A+laa with if.a 4-8 fiomrPS of
+
Again, if, as is usually the case, a student has only a few cross-sections through this region the Atlas with its 48 figures of sections.
  
  
  
At the urgent solicitation of Professor Ph. Stohr,  
+
At the urgent solicitation of Professor Ph. Stohr, of Wiirzburg, Germany, Dr. F Ziegler, of Freiburg, Germany, is considering the reduplication of the model on which this atlas is based. It is expected that such models, from his studio, will be available within  
of Wiirzburg, Germany, Dr. F Ziegler, of Freiburg,  
 
Germany, is considering the reduplication of the model  
 
on which this atlas is based. It is expected that  
 
such models, from his studio, will be available within  
 
 
the year .  
 
the year .  
  
Line 93: Line 87:
 
==Editor's Preface==
 
==Editor's Preface==
  
This Atlas is planned to meet the practical need of some quick The need of
+
This Atlas is planned to meet the practical need of some quick and simple, yet full and reliable, means of aiding the student to obtain, from a few sections (or from a series of sections), a reasonably clear idea of the important central relay-station of the brain here presented. (Though representing the human brain, the atlas can be applied to the study of the brains of lower mammals.)
and simple, yet full and reliable, means of aiding the student to  
+
 
obtain, from a few sections (or from a series of sections), a reasonably clear idea of the important central relay-station of the brain  
+
 
here presented. (Though representing the human brain, the atlas  
+
The time allotted to a course in Neurology is generally so short; the sections to be studied exhibit such great special complexity of structure, due to the presence and association of many different centres in the narrow limits of the region; and the descriptions in text-books or lectures are commonly so detailed, or so general or diagrammatic; that many students get but hazy ideas of what is shown in their preparations, without spending more time in the effort than is reasonable.
can be applied to the study of the brains of lower mammals.)  
+
 
 +
 
 +
We believe, and a number of well-known teachers in several of our large universities have agreed in this opinion, that this little Atlas will offer a valuable and new remedy for the difficulties stated above; and will save the student much time for real study, now often spent in getting started.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
Supplied with these excellent drawings of the reconstruction, showing for the first time accurately and satisiactorily structures to be studied, the student can quickly compare his own sections with the figures of the Atlas and find the parts there clearly designated and explained.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
Again, if, as is usually the case, a student has only a few crosssections through this region, the Atlas, with its 48 figures of sections cut in two planes and drawn to resemble actual preparations, furnishes a good supplementary series of sections for comparison.
  
The time allotted to a course in Neurology is generally so short;
 
the sections to be studied exhibit such great special complexity of
 
structure, due to the presence and association of many different
 
centres in the narrow limits of the region; and the descriptions in
 
text-books or lectures are commonly so detailed, or so general or
 
diagrammatic; that many students get but hazy ideas of what is
 
shown in their preparations, without spending more time in the
 
effort than is reasonable.
 
  
We believe, and a number of well-known teachers in several of  
+
It is thus easy to understand the many sections which are not through particularly well-marked points usually figured in textbooks; and it is possible to get a very satisfactory idea of any structure, by turning to the two series figured, to the colored plates and to the index.
our large universities have agreed in this opinion, that this little
 
Atlas will offer a valuable and new remedy for the difficulties
 
stated above; and will save the student much time for real study,
 
now often spent in getting started.  
 
  
Supplied with these excellent drawings of the reconstruction, its use with , sections.  
+
Tracts in the Spinal Cord may be more readily understood and Spinal Cord traced forward into the brain with the aid of this manual.
  
showing for the first time accurately and satisiactorily structures
+
The text not only describes, in a convenient manner and fully, everything figured in the reconstruction; but the paragraphs of small print, and others referred to in the headings and index, explain just how to compare sections with the model, and how to trace nerve-fibre tracts or masses of gray matter, from section to section through this region.
to be studied, the student can quickly compare his own sections  
 
with the figures of the Atlas and find the parts there clearly
 
designated and explained.  
 
  
Again, if, as is usually the case, a student has only a few crosssections through this region, the Atlas, with its 48 figures of sections cut in two planes and drawn to resemble actual preparations,
 
furnishes a good supplementary series of sections for comparison.
 
  
It is thus easy to understand the many sections which are not
+
When it is realized that this model represents that part of the brain in which the nuclei of origin of all the true cranial nerves are found; that association tracts between these centres are here included; that the cells and fibre-tracts are brought into intimate association, from their central position, with those of the Spinal Cord, Cerebellum, and Forebrain; the usefulness of the Atlas to the Anatomist, Physiologist, Pathologist, and Psychologist, whether in the laboratory or in connection with lectures and demonstrations, may be seen.
through particularly well-marked points usually figured in textbooks; and it is possible to get a very satisfactory idea of any structure, by turning to the two series figured, to the colored plates
 
and to the index,  
 
with sections of Tracts in the Spinal Cord may be more readily understood and Spinal Cord. 'traced forward into the brain with the aid of this manual.
 
The arrangement The text not only describes, in a convenient manner and fully,  
 
' everything figured in the reconstruction; but the paragraphs of
 
small print, and others referred to in the headings and index, explain just how to compare sections with the model, and how to trace
 
nerve-fibre tracts or masses of gray matter, from section to section through this region.  
 
  
The importance When it is realized that this model represents that part of the
 
f the Braku brain in which the nuclei of origin of all the true cranial nerves
 
are found; that association tracts between these centres are here
 
included; that the cells and fibre-tracts are brought into intimate
 
association, from their central position, with those of the Spinal
 
Cord, Cerebellum, and Forebrain; the usefulness of the Atlas to
 
the Anatomist, Physiologist, Pathologist, and Psychologist, whether
 
in the laboratory or in connection with lectures and demonstrations,
 
may be seen.
 
  
supplementary A short list of text-books and journals has been included, to  
+
A short list of text-books and journals has been included, to permit the tracing of certain tracts of nerve-fibres further up into the higher brain centres or down into the cord, and to encourage the student to seek information as to the many and varied sides of Neurology from reliable sources where more extensive references are to be found.
" permit the tracing of certain tracts of nerve-fibres further up into  
 
the higher brain centres or down into the cord, and to encourage the  
 
student to seek information as to the many and varied sides of  
 
Neurology from reliable sources where more extensive references  
 
are to be found.  
 
  
The Editor wishes to explain that his participation in this Atlas
 
is confined to the suggestion of publishing the original research in
 
the present modified new form, and to assistance in a considerable
 
rearrangement of the text and index to facilitate ready reference.
 
He has urged this publication in order to furnish the student, in a
 
new and especially available form, a valuable guide to the ready
 
  
interpretation of his preparations.  
+
The Editor wishes to explain that his participation in this Atlas is confined to the suggestion of publishing the original research in the present modified new form, and to assistance in a considerable rearrangement of the text and index to facilitate ready reference. He has urged this publication in order to furnish the student, in a new and especially available form, a valuable guide to the ready interpretation of his preparations.
  
HENRY Mo E. KNOWER.
 
ANATOMICAL LABORATORY,
 
  
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY.  
+
Henry Mc E. Knower. Anatomical Laboratory,
  
 +
Johns Hopkins University.
  
 +
==Author's Preface==
  
AUTHOR'S PREFACE.  
+
A description and the plates of a reconstruction of the medulla oblongata of the new-born babe was published in the " Contributions to the Science of Medicine," dedicated to William Henry Welch.<ref> Model of the Medulla, Pons and Midbrain of a New-born Babe, by Florence R. Sabin. Contributions to the Science of Medicine, and vol. ix of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Reports.</ref> The model was built in the Anatomical Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University at the suggestion of Dr. Franklin P. Mall and Dr. Lewellys F. Barker. It was the original thought that such a reconstruction would not only show graphically for the first time the form and relations of the tracts and nuclei, but that it would simplify for the student of anatomy a region both complex and difficult. The shape of the tracts in the cord was well known, the forms of the internal capsule in the brain could be fairly well imagined, but the tracts between the cord and brain were too complex to give mental pictures without the aid of a model. The suggestion has been made by Dr. H. Me E. Knower, of the Anatomical Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins Medical School, that the description of the model be put into a more convenient form for the student; by means of fuller references to the plates and sections; by a rearrangement of contents to make the location in the model of any set of serial sections or any single section of the region an easy matter; by adding a full index; and by a list of literature containing a few of the most important references valuable to the student at the beginning of a study of the central nervous system of man or the mammals. I am indebted to him for the arrangements for this edition.
  
A description and the plates of a reconstruction of the medulla
 
oblongata of the new-born babe was published in the " Contributions to the Science of Medicine," dedicated to William Henry
 
Welch. 1 The model was built in the Anatomical Laboratory of
 
the Johns Hopkins University at the suggestion of Dr. Franklin
 
P. Mall and Dr. Lewellys F. Barker. It was the original thought
 
that such a reconstruction would not only show graphically for the
 
first time the form and relations of the tracts and nuclei, but that
 
it would simplify for the student of anatomy a region both complex and difficult. The shape of the tracts in the cord was well
 
known, the forms of the internal capsule in the brain could be
 
fairly well imagined, but the tracts between the cord and brain
 
were too complex to give mental pictures without the aid of a
 
model. The suggestion has been made by Dr. H. Me E. Knower,
 
of the Anatomical Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins Medical
 
School, that the description of the model be put into a more convenient form for the student; by means of fuller references to
 
the plates and sections; by a rearrangement of contents to make
 
the location in the model of any set of serial sections or any single
 
section of the region an easy matter; by adding a full index; and
 
by a list of literature containing a few of the most important
 
references valuable to the student at the beginning of a study
 
of the central nervous system of man or the mammals. I am indebted to him for the arrangements for this edition.
 
  
I wish to thank Dr. John Hewetson for the material which  
+
I wish to thank Dr. John Hewetson for the material which made the model possible. Both series were unbroken, and so admirably prepared that any omissions in the model are due not to the material, but to the nature of the structures in question. I am greatly indebted to Mr. Max Broedel for the beautiful illustrations of the model. They are so accurate and clear as to be equal in value to the model itself. It is through the kindness of Dr. Henry M. Hurd that the plates of these drawings can be used for the present edition. Dr. Franklin P. Mall controlled the construction of the model, Dr. Lewellys F. Barker its study. I acknowledge with thanks their unfailing help and interest.
made the model possible. Both series were unbroken, and so admirably prepared that any omissions in the model are due not to the material, but to the nature of the structures in question.  
+
I wish to thank Dr. John Hewetson for the material which made the model possible. Both series were unbroken, and so admirably prepared that any omissions in the model are due not to the material, but to the nature of the structures in question.  
 
I am greatly indebted to Mr. Max Broedel for the beautiful illustrations of the model. They are so accurate and clear as to be  
 
I am greatly indebted to Mr. Max Broedel for the beautiful illustrations of the model. They are so accurate and clear as to be  
 
equal in value to the model itself. It is through the kindness of  
 
equal in value to the model itself. It is through the kindness of  
Line 198: Line 136:
  
  
1 Model of the Medulla, Pons and Midbrain of a New-born Babe, by Florence R. Sabin. Contributions to the Science of Medicine, and vol. ix of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Reports.
+
<references/>
 
 
 
 
  
 
==Contents==
 
==Contents==

Latest revision as of 07:27, 10 November 2017

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العربية | català | 中文 | 中國傳統的 | français | Deutsche | עִברִית | हिंदी | bahasa Indonesia | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | မြန်မာ | Pilipino | Polskie | português | ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਦੇ | Română | русский | Español | Swahili | Svensk | ไทย | Türkçe | اردو | ייִדיש | Tiếng Việt    These external translations are automated and may not be accurate. (More? About Translations)

Sabin FR. and Knower H. An atlas of the medulla and midbrain, a laboratory manual (1901) Baltimore: Friedenwald.

Online Editor  
Mark Hill.jpg
This 1901 book by Florence Rena Sabin (1871 - 1953) and her collaborator presents one of the very earliest atlases of the human central nervous system, describing the midbrain and brainstem. This atlas was extremely useful for later researchers attempting to both understand the development and mapping of the midbrain and medulla. Florence Sabin later work was as a key historic researcher in early 1900's establishing our early understanding of both vascular and lymphatic development in the embryo.



Modern Notes: Medulla | Mesencephalon | Florence Sabin

Neural Links: ectoderm | neural | neural crest | ventricular | sensory | Stage 22 | gliogenesis | neural fetal | Medicine Lecture - Neural | Lecture - Ectoderm | Lecture - Neural Crest | Lab - Early Neural | neural abnormalities | folic acid | iodine deficiency | Fetal Alcohol Syndrome | neural postnatal | neural examination | Histology | Historic Neural | Category:Neural


Neural Tube Development
Neural Tube Primary Vesicles Secondary Vesicles Adult Structures
week 3 week 4 week 5 adult
neural plate
neural groove
neural tube

Brain
prosencephalon (forebrain) telencephalon Rhinencephalon, Amygdala, hippocampus, cerebrum (cortex), hypothalamus‎, pituitary | Basal Ganglia, lateral ventricles
diencephalon epithalamus, thalamus, Subthalamus, pineal, posterior commissure, pretectum, third ventricle
mesencephalon (midbrain) mesencephalon tectum, Cerebral peduncle, cerebral aqueduct, pons
rhombencephalon (hindbrain) metencephalon cerebellum
myelencephalon medulla oblongata, isthmus
spinal cord, pyramidal decussation, central canal
Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

An Atlas Of The Medulla And Midbrain

Sabin1901 titlepage.jpg
Florence Rena Sabin (1871 - 1953)
Florence Rena Sabin (1871-1953)

By Florence R. Sabin


A Laboratory Manual

Illustrated With Seven Colored Plates, One Black Plate And Fifty-Two Figures


Edited By


Henry McE. Knower, PH.D.

Instructor in Anatomy in the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.


Baltimore, Md., U. S. A.

The Friedenwald Company

Publishers

1901


Copyright, 1901, By Florence R. Sabin


The Friedenwald Company Baltimore, Md M U. S. A.

Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Editor's Preface

This Atlas is planned to meet the practical need of some quick and simple, yet full and reliable, means of aiding the student to obtain, from a few sections (or from a series of sections), a reasonably clear idea of the important central relay-station of the brain here presented. (Though representing the human brain, the atlas can be applied to the study of the brains of lower mammals.)


The time allotted to a course in Neurology is generally so short; the sections to be studied exhibit such great special complexity of structure, due to the presence and association of many different centres in the narrow limits of the region; and the descriptions in text-books or lectures are commonly so detailed, or so general or diagrammatic; that many students get but hazy ideas of what is shown in their preparations, without spending more time in the effort than is reasonable.


We believe, and a number of well-known teachers in several of our large universities have agreed in this opinion, that this little Atlas will offer a valuable and new remedy for the difficulties stated above; and will save the student much time for real study, now often spent in getting started.


Supplied with these excellent drawings of the reconstruction, showing for the first time accurately and satisfactorily structures to be studied, the student can quickly compare his own sections with the figures of the Atlas and find the parts there clearly designated and explained.


Again, if, as is usually the case, a student has only a few cross-sections through this region the Atlas with its 48 figures of sections.


At the urgent solicitation of Professor Ph. Stohr, of Wiirzburg, Germany, Dr. F Ziegler, of Freiburg, Germany, is considering the reduplication of the model on which this atlas is based. It is expected that such models, from his studio, will be available within the year .



Florence R. Sabin, M. D


May 31, 1901.



Editor's Preface

This Atlas is planned to meet the practical need of some quick and simple, yet full and reliable, means of aiding the student to obtain, from a few sections (or from a series of sections), a reasonably clear idea of the important central relay-station of the brain here presented. (Though representing the human brain, the atlas can be applied to the study of the brains of lower mammals.)


The time allotted to a course in Neurology is generally so short; the sections to be studied exhibit such great special complexity of structure, due to the presence and association of many different centres in the narrow limits of the region; and the descriptions in text-books or lectures are commonly so detailed, or so general or diagrammatic; that many students get but hazy ideas of what is shown in their preparations, without spending more time in the effort than is reasonable.


We believe, and a number of well-known teachers in several of our large universities have agreed in this opinion, that this little Atlas will offer a valuable and new remedy for the difficulties stated above; and will save the student much time for real study, now often spent in getting started.


Supplied with these excellent drawings of the reconstruction, showing for the first time accurately and satisiactorily structures to be studied, the student can quickly compare his own sections with the figures of the Atlas and find the parts there clearly designated and explained.


Again, if, as is usually the case, a student has only a few crosssections through this region, the Atlas, with its 48 figures of sections cut in two planes and drawn to resemble actual preparations, furnishes a good supplementary series of sections for comparison.


It is thus easy to understand the many sections which are not through particularly well-marked points usually figured in textbooks; and it is possible to get a very satisfactory idea of any structure, by turning to the two series figured, to the colored plates and to the index.

Tracts in the Spinal Cord may be more readily understood and Spinal Cord traced forward into the brain with the aid of this manual.

The text not only describes, in a convenient manner and fully, everything figured in the reconstruction; but the paragraphs of small print, and others referred to in the headings and index, explain just how to compare sections with the model, and how to trace nerve-fibre tracts or masses of gray matter, from section to section through this region.


When it is realized that this model represents that part of the brain in which the nuclei of origin of all the true cranial nerves are found; that association tracts between these centres are here included; that the cells and fibre-tracts are brought into intimate association, from their central position, with those of the Spinal Cord, Cerebellum, and Forebrain; the usefulness of the Atlas to the Anatomist, Physiologist, Pathologist, and Psychologist, whether in the laboratory or in connection with lectures and demonstrations, may be seen.


A short list of text-books and journals has been included, to permit the tracing of certain tracts of nerve-fibres further up into the higher brain centres or down into the cord, and to encourage the student to seek information as to the many and varied sides of Neurology from reliable sources where more extensive references are to be found.


The Editor wishes to explain that his participation in this Atlas is confined to the suggestion of publishing the original research in the present modified new form, and to assistance in a considerable rearrangement of the text and index to facilitate ready reference. He has urged this publication in order to furnish the student, in a new and especially available form, a valuable guide to the ready interpretation of his preparations.


Henry Mc E. Knower. Anatomical Laboratory,

Johns Hopkins University.

Author's Preface

A description and the plates of a reconstruction of the medulla oblongata of the new-born babe was published in the " Contributions to the Science of Medicine," dedicated to William Henry Welch.[1] The model was built in the Anatomical Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University at the suggestion of Dr. Franklin P. Mall and Dr. Lewellys F. Barker. It was the original thought that such a reconstruction would not only show graphically for the first time the form and relations of the tracts and nuclei, but that it would simplify for the student of anatomy a region both complex and difficult. The shape of the tracts in the cord was well known, the forms of the internal capsule in the brain could be fairly well imagined, but the tracts between the cord and brain were too complex to give mental pictures without the aid of a model. The suggestion has been made by Dr. H. Me E. Knower, of the Anatomical Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins Medical School, that the description of the model be put into a more convenient form for the student; by means of fuller references to the plates and sections; by a rearrangement of contents to make the location in the model of any set of serial sections or any single section of the region an easy matter; by adding a full index; and by a list of literature containing a few of the most important references valuable to the student at the beginning of a study of the central nervous system of man or the mammals. I am indebted to him for the arrangements for this edition.


I wish to thank Dr. John Hewetson for the material which made the model possible. Both series were unbroken, and so admirably prepared that any omissions in the model are due not to the material, but to the nature of the structures in question. I am greatly indebted to Mr. Max Broedel for the beautiful illustrations of the model. They are so accurate and clear as to be equal in value to the model itself. It is through the kindness of Dr. Henry M. Hurd that the plates of these drawings can be used for the present edition. Dr. Franklin P. Mall controlled the construction of the model, Dr. Lewellys F. Barker its study. I acknowledge with thanks their unfailing help and interest. I wish to thank Dr. John Hewetson for the material which made the model possible. Both series were unbroken, and so admirably prepared that any omissions in the model are due not to the material, but to the nature of the structures in question. I am greatly indebted to Mr. Max Broedel for the beautiful illustrations of the model. They are so accurate and clear as to be equal in value to the model itself. It is through the kindness of Dr. Henry M. Hurd that the plates of these drawings can be used for the present edition. Dr. Franklin P. Mall controlled the construction of the model, Dr. Lewellys F. Barker its study. I acknowledge with thanks their unfailing help and interest.


  1. Model of the Medulla, Pons and Midbrain of a New-born Babe, by Florence R. Sabin. Contributions to the Science of Medicine, and vol. ix of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Reports.

Contents

Chapter I. Introductory

Method Of Using Atlas

Chapter II. The Long Tracts

A. In The Medulla (Medulla Sheet)
B. In The Pons And Midbrain (Lemnisci And Formatio Reticularis)

Chapter III. The Columns Of The Spinal Cord

A. Ventrolateral Column
(A) Ventral Part
(B) Dorsal Part
B. Dorsal Column

Chapter IV. Cerebellar Peduncles

Inferior Peduncle, Or Corpus Restiforme
Superior Peduncle, Or Brachium Conjunctivum

Chapter V. The Cerebral Nerves And Their Nuclei

Median Group (Red In Model).
(A) N. Hypoglossus, XII Nucleus N., XII
(B) N. Abducens, VI Nucleus N., VI
(C) N. Trochlearis, IV Nucleus N., Iv 56
(D) N. Oculomotorius, III Nucleus N., III

Chapter VI. The Cerebral Nerves And Their Nuclei (Continued). Lateral Group

A. Motor Nerves (Red In Model)
(A) N. Accessprius, XI Nucleus N., XI.
(B) N. Glossopharyngeus Et N. Vagus, Ix And X Nucleus N., Ix And X
(C) N. Facialis, VII Nucleus N., VII
(D) N. Trigeminus, V Nucleus N., V
B. Sensory Nerves (Blue In Model)
(A) N. Glossopharyngeus Et N. Vagus, Ix And X Nucleus N. , Ix And X
(B) N. Trigeminus, V Nucleus N., V
(C) N. Vestibuli, Viii Nuclei N. Vestibuli
(D) N. Cochleae, Viii Nuclei N. Cochlese

Chapter VII. The Inferior And Accessory Olives

Chapter VIII. The Midbrain

  1. Relation Of Its Structures To The Central Fibre Mass
  2. The Nucleus Ruber (Red Nucleus) And Its Capsule
  3. The Fasciculus Retroflexus (Meynerti)
  4. The Decussatio Tegmenti Dorsalis (Meynerti)
  5. The Decussatio Tegmenti Ventralis Of Forel
  6. Stratum Album Prof Undum (Deep White Layer)
  7. Substantia Centralis Grisea (Central Gray Matter)
  8. The Pyramidal Tract
  9. Substantia Nigra

Chapter IX. The Formatio Reticularis Alba And Grisea

General Summary of what Is shown In Reconstruction

References To Literature

Figures



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Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)


An Atlas of the Medulla and Midbrain (1901): Chapter I. Introductory | Chapter II. The Long Tracts | Chapter III. The Columns Of The Spinal Cord | Chapter IV. Cerebellar Peduncles | Chapter V. The Cerebral Nerves And Their Nuclei | Chapter VI. The Cerebral Nerves And Their Nuclei (Continued). Lateral Group | Chapter VII. The Inferior And Accessory Olives | Chapter VIII. The Midbrain | Chapter IX. The Formatio Reticularis Alba And Grisea | General Summary of what Is shown In Reconstruction | References To Literature | Abbreviations | Description of Figures and Plates


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2021, May 13) Embryology Book - An Atlas of the Medulla and Midbrain. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_An_Atlas_of_the_Medulla_and_Midbrain

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