ANAT2341 Lab 2

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1. QUIZ

2. Guest Lecturer - A/Prof Robert Gilchrist

Oocyte BMP15 and GDF9 effects PMID 25058588
Associate Professor Robert Gilchrist

A/Prof Robert Gilchrist

The Reproductive Technology Revolution



Dr Gilchristis head of the Oocyte Biology Research Unit (UNSW) his primary research interests are in the regulation of mammalian oocyte development and maturation, and the development of novel oocyte maturation techniques for infertility treatment.

Lecture Slides



Links: UNSW Research Gateway | PubMed

Recent Articles

[1]

"The cyclic nucleotides, cAMP and cGMP, are the key molecules controlling mammalian oocyte meiosis. Their roles in oocyte biology have been at the forefront of oocyte research for decades and many of the long standing controversies in relation to the regulation of oocyte meiotic maturation are now resolved. It is now clear that the follicle prevents meiotic resumption through the actions of natriuretic peptides and cGMP inhibiting the hydrolysis of intra-oocyte cAMP and that the preovulatory gonadotrophin surge reverses these processes. The gonadotrophin surge also leads to a transient spike in cAMP in the somatic compartment of the follicle; research over the past 2 decades has conclusively demonstrated that this surge in cAMP is important for the subsequent developmental capacity of the oocyte. This is important, as oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) systems practiced clinically do not recapitulate this cAMP surge in vitro, possibly accounting for the lower efficiency of IVM compared to clinical IVF. This review focuses in particular on this latter aspect - the role of cAMP/cGMP in the regulation of oocyte quality. We conclude that clinical practice of IVM should reflect this new understanding of the role of cyclic nucleotides, thereby creating a new generation of ART and fertility treatment options."

[2]

[3]

3. Group Project


 2017 ANAT2341 - Timetable | Course Outline | Group Projects | Moodle | Tutorial 1 | Tutorial 2 | Tutorial 3

Labs: 1 Fertility and IVF | 2 ES Cells to Genome Editing | 3 Preimplantation and Early Implantation | 4 Reproductive Technology Revolution | 5 Cardiac and Vascular Development | 6 CRISPR-Cas9 | 7 Somitogenesis and Vertebral Malformation | 8 Organogenesis | 9 Genetic Disorders | 10 Melanocytes | 11 Stem Cells | 12 Group

Lectures: 1 Introduction | 2 Fertilization | 3 Week 1/2 | 4 Week 3 | 5 Ectoderm | 6 Placenta | 7 Mesoderm | 8 Endoderm | 9 Research Technology | 10 Cardiovascular | 11 Respiratory | 12 Neural crest | 13 Head | 14 Musculoskeletal | 15 Limb | 16 Renal | 17 Genital | 18 Endocrine | 19 Sensory | 20 Fetal | 21 Integumentary | 22 Birth | 23 Stem cells | 24 Revision

 Student Projects: 1 Cortex | 2 Kidney | 3 Heart | 4 Eye | 5 Lung | 6 Cerebellum
  1. Gilchrist RB, Luciano AM, Richani D, Zeng HT, Wang X, Vos MD, Sugimura S, Smitz J, Richard FJ & Thompson JG. (2016). Oocyte maturation and quality: role of cyclic nucleotides. Reproduction , 152, R143-57. PMID: 27422885 DOI.
  2. Robertson DM, Gilchrist RB, Ledger WL & Baerwald A. (2016). Random start or emergency IVF/in vitro maturation: a new rapid approach to fertility preservation. Womens Health (Lond) , 12, 339-49. PMID: 27248769 DOI.
  3. Russell DL, Gilchrist RB, Brown HM & Thompson JG. (2016). Bidirectional communication between cumulus cells and the oocyte: Old hands and new players?. Theriogenology , 86, 62-8. PMID: 27160446 DOI.