Difference between revisions of "ANAT2341 Lab 2"

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PRACTICAL CLASS PROGRAM:
== 1. QUIZ ==
 
  
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* Weekly Quiz + revision (15 minutes)
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* Practical class activities: (45 minutes)
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* Guest Lecture by [https://wch.med.unsw.edu.au/people/associate-professor-robert-gilchrist Professor Robert Gilchrist] (45 minutes)
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* Practical Class Revision (15 minutes)
  
==2. Guest Lecturer - Prof Robert Gilchrist ==
 
[[File:Oocyte BMP15 and GDF9 effects.jpg|thumb|Oocyte BMP15 and GDF9 effects{{#pmid:25058588|PMID25058588}}]]
 
{|
 
  
| [[File:Rob Gilchrist.jpg|left|150px|alt=Associate Professor Robert Gilchrist|link=https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/professor-robert-bruce-gilchrist]]
 
  
[https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/professor-robert-bruce-gilchrist Prof Robert Gilchrist]
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PRACTICAL CLASS ACTIVITIES:
| '''The Reproductive Technology Revolution'''
 
<br><br>
 
Dr Gilchristis head of the Oocyte Biology Research Unit (UNSW) his primary research interests are in the regulation of mammalian oocyte development and maturation, and the development of novel oocyte maturation techniques for infertility treatment.
 
  
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# Virtual human embryo dissections and histology
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# Embryo models and specimens of human developmental abnormalities (optional)
  
[[Media:2017 Anatomy IVF and embryology lab.pdf|Lecture Slides]]
 
  
<br><br>
 
  
Links: [https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/professor-robert-bruce-gilchrist UNSW Research Gateway] |  [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Gilchrist+R%5BAuthor%5D PubMed]
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LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
|-
 
|}
 
  
===Recent Articles===
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* Understanding of reproductive technologies
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* Understanding of events during early ectoderm and mesoderm development
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* Understanding of the process of neurulation and neural crest formation
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* Understanding of the adult components derived from ectoderm and mesoderm
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* Understanding the process of body cavity formation
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* Brief understanding of early heart formation
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* Brief understanding of abnormalities associated with early ectoderm and mesoderm development
  
{{#pmid:29503399}}
 
  
:"The administration of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) prior to oocyte retrieval improves oocyte developmental competence. During bovine embryo production in vitro, however, oocytes are typically derived from FSH-unprimed animals. In the current study, we examined the effect of pre-in vitro maturation (IVM) with cAMP modulators, also known as the second messengers of FSH, on the developmental competence of oocytes derived from small antral follicles (2-4 mm) of FSH-unprimed animals. Pre-IVM with N6,2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclicmonophosphate (dbcAMP) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) for 2 h improved the blastocyst formation in oocytes stimulated by FSH or amphiregulin (AREG). Furthermore, pre-IVM enhanced the expression of the FSH- or AREG-stimulated extracellular matrix-related genes HAS2, TNFAIP6, and PTGS2, and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like peptide-related genes AREG and EREG. Additionally, pre-IVM with dbcAMP and IBMX enhanced the expression of EGFR, and also increased and prolonged cumulus cell-oocyte gap junctional communication. The improved oocyte development observed using the pre-IVM protocol was ablated by an EGF receptor phosphorylation inhibitor. These results indicate that pre-IVM with cAMP modulators could contribute to the acquisition of developmental competence by bovine oocytes from small antral follicles through the modulation of EGF receptor signaling and oocyte-cumulus/cumulus-cumulus gap junctional communication."
 
  
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PRACTICAL CLASS NOTES:
  
{{#pmid:27879344}}
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The Practical class notes are available on [https://moodle.telt.unsw.edu.au/mod/url/view.php?id=2398854 Moodle].
 
 
:"In vitro maturation (IVM) offers significant benefits for human infertility treatment and animal breeding, but this potential is yet to be fully realised due to reduced oocyte developmental competence in comparison with in vivo matured oocytes. Cumulus cells occupy an essential position in determining oocyte developmental competence. Here we have examined the areas of deficient gene expression, as determined within microarrays primarily from cumulus cells of mouse COCs, but also other species, between in vivo matured and in vitro matured oocytes. By retrospectively analysing the literature, directed by focussing on downregulated genes, we provide an insight as to why the in vitro cumulus cells fail to support full oocyte potential and dissect molecular pathways that have important roles in oocyte competence. We conclude that the roles of epidermal growth factor signalling, the expanded extracellular matrix, cumulus cell metabolism and the immune system are critical deficiencies in cumulus cells of IVM COCs."
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
{{#pmid:27422885}}
 
 
 
:"The cyclic nucleotides, cAMP and cGMP, are the key molecules controlling mammalian oocyte meiosis. Their roles in oocyte biology have been at the forefront of oocyte research for decades and many of the long standing controversies in relation to the regulation of oocyte meiotic maturation are now resolved. It is now clear that the follicle prevents meiotic resumption through the actions of natriuretic peptides and cGMP inhibiting the hydrolysis of intra-oocyte cAMP and that the preovulatory gonadotrophin surge reverses these processes. The gonadotrophin surge also leads to a transient spike in cAMP in the somatic compartment of the follicle; research over the past 2 decades has conclusively demonstrated that this surge in cAMP is important for the subsequent developmental capacity of the oocyte. This is important, as oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) systems practiced clinically do not recapitulate this cAMP surge in vitro, possibly accounting for the lower efficiency of IVM compared to clinical IVF. This review focuses in particular on this latter aspect - the role of cAMP/cGMP in the regulation of oocyte quality. We conclude that clinical practice of IVM should reflect this new understanding of the role of cyclic nucleotides, thereby creating a new generation of ART and fertility treatment options."
 
 
 
{{#pmid:27248769}}
 
 
 
{{#pmid:27160446}}
 
 
 
 
 
<br>
 
 
 
<references/>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
{{2018ANAT2341}}
 

Latest revision as of 11:41, 26 September 2019

PRACTICAL CLASS PROGRAM:

  • Weekly Quiz + revision (15 minutes)
  • Practical class activities: (45 minutes)
  • Guest Lecture by Professor Robert Gilchrist (45 minutes)
  • Practical Class Revision (15 minutes)


PRACTICAL CLASS ACTIVITIES:

  1. Virtual human embryo dissections and histology
  2. Embryo models and specimens of human developmental abnormalities (optional)


LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Understanding of reproductive technologies
  • Understanding of events during early ectoderm and mesoderm development
  • Understanding of the process of neurulation and neural crest formation
  • Understanding of the adult components derived from ectoderm and mesoderm
  • Understanding the process of body cavity formation
  • Brief understanding of early heart formation
  • Brief understanding of abnormalities associated with early ectoderm and mesoderm development


PRACTICAL CLASS NOTES:

The Practical class notes are available on Moodle.