Difference between revisions of "2014 Group Project 4"

From Embryology
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--[[User:Z8600021|Mark Hill]] ([[User talk:Z8600021|talk]]) 11:53, 6 September 2014 (EST) Just references not much else here yet.
 
--[[User:Z8600021|Mark Hill]] ([[User talk:Z8600021|talk]]) 11:53, 6 September 2014 (EST) Just references not much else here yet.
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==Developmental timeline==
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{| class="wikitable sortable"
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|-
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! Weeks !! Female !! Male
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| Example || Example || Example
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| Example || Example || Example
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==System Development==
 
==System Development==

Revision as of 12:50, 10 September 2014

2014 Student Projects
2014 Student Projects: Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5 | Group 6 | Group 7 | Group 8
The Group assessment for 2014 will be an online project on Fetal Development of a specific System.

This page is an undergraduate science embryology student and may contain inaccuracies in either description or acknowledgements.

Genital

--Mark Hill (talk) 15:13, 26 August 2014 (EST) No sub-headings yet and I even had to add your project title! Get moving.

--Mark Hill (talk) 11:53, 6 September 2014 (EST) Just references not much else here yet.

Developmental timeline

Weeks Female Male
Example Example Example
Example Example Example
Example Example Example

System Development

Genital system development is an extremely interesting area of embryology as it is not until the later stages of embryogenesis (around week 4-6) that sexual differentiation occurs in the fetus, and the sexual organs actually look very similar up until this point, and the formation of the correct sex organs depend really on whether the genital ridge releases Testosterone or oestrogen

<pubmed>24240231</pubmed> <pubmed>24928207</pubmed> <pubmed>24741072</pubmed> --Z3416697 (talk) 20:06, 26 August 2014 (EST)

Current Research Models and Findings

--Z3417753 (talk) 22:43, 26 August 2014 (EST)

<pubmed>18367374</pubmed> <pubmed>15086026</pubmed> <pubmed>14641326</pubmed> <pubmed>11684660</pubmed> <pubmed>22127979</pubmed>

Historic Finding

--Z3415716 (talk) 01:10, 27 August 2014 (EST)

<pubmed>18462432</pubmed> <pubmed>17232227</pubmed> Martyn P. L. Williams, John M. Huston The history of ideas about testicular descent. Pediatric Surgery International: 1991, 6(3):180-184 The history of ideas about testicular descent

Abnormalities

Female

Male

Cryptorchidism

Hypospadias

In males the most common congenital malformation of the external genitalia is hypospadias, it’s also the second most common developmental disorder. It occurs due to the midline fusion of the male urethra, as a result the urethral meatus is misplaced. There are several sites where this abnormality may occur: granular, penile, penoscrotal, scrotal and perineal. (3). Its believed that genetic factors contribute to the presence of the disorder, however endocrine and environmental factors are also of significance. (1) Treatment The surgical methods currently used to treat distal hypospadias, include tabularized incised plate and meatal advancement and glansplasty intergrated repair. For proximal forms two staged procedures are employed. (2)

References

--Z3417458 (talk) 21:01, 26 August 2014 (EST)

<<pubmed>24290348</pubmed>>

<<pubmed>25064170</pubmed>>

<<pubmed>23168057</pubmed>>

A review on spermatogenesis and cyptorchidism a common in males, results in an absence of testes either one or both.

<<pubmed>24829558</pubmed>>