Prize Essay on the Corpus Luteum (1851) Plates

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العربية | català | 中文 | 中國傳統的 | français | Deutsche | עִברִית | हिंदी | bahasa Indonesia | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | မြန်မာ | Pilipino | Polskie | português | ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਦੇ | Română | русский | Español | Swahili | Svensk | ไทย | Türkçe | اردو | ייִדיש | Tiếng Việt    These external translations are automated and may not be accurate. (More? About Translations)

Dalton JC Prize essay on the corpus luteum of menstruation and pregnancy. (1851) Philadelphia: T.K. and P.G. Collins.

Online Editor  
Mark Hill.jpg
This historic 1851 paper by Dalton is a very early historic description of the corpus luteum.



See also - Lee R. On the structure of the corpus luteum. (1839) Med Chir Trans. 22: 329-37. PMID 20895693

Modern Notes: corpus luteum

Menstrual Cycle Links: Introduction | menstrual histology | ovary | corpus luteum | oocyte | uterus | Uterine Gland | estrous cycle | pregnancy test
Historic Embryology - Menstrual 
1839 Corpus Luteum Structure | 1851 Corpus Luteum | 1933 Pap Smear | 1937 Corpus Luteum Hormone | 1942 Human Reproduction Hormones | 1951 Corpus Luteum | 1969 Ultrastructure of Development and Regression | 1969 Ultrastructure during Pregnancy
Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
  Corpus Luteum 1851: Part 1 - Corpus Luteum of Menstruation | Part 2 - Corpus Luteum of Pregnancy | Part 3 - Observations on Animals | Plates


N. B. — All the drawings were taken from nature, and are of the natural size (in the original article). The figures in the first two plates are all taken from the human subject.

Plate I

Fig. 1. Graafian vesicle, recently ruptured and filled with blood. (Obs. 1.)


Fig. 2. Ovary of a girl three weeks after menstruation ; showing the prominence and vascularity over the corpus luteum. (Obs. 6.)


Fig. 3. The same ovary cut open; showing the corpus luteum of menstruation three weeks old.


Fig. 4. Corpus luteum of menstruation four weeks old. (Obs. 9.)


Fig. 5. Corpus luteum of menstruation thirty days old. (Obs. 10.)

Dalton1851 plate01.jpg

Plate II

Fig. 1. Corpus luteum of menstruation nine weeks old. (Obs. 11.)


Fig. 2. Corpus luteum of pregnancy about the end of the second month. (Obs. 12.)


Fig. 3. Corpus luteum of pregnancy about the termination of the fourth month. (Obs. 13.)


Fig. 4. Ovary of a woman seven months pregnant; showing the prominence of the corpus luteum. (Obs. 14.)


Fig. 5. The same ovary cut open.

Dalton1851 plate02.jpg

Plate III

Fig. 1. Ovary of an unimpregnated cow. (Obs. 20.)

a. Old corpus luteum seen externally.

b. New corpus luteum seen externally.

Fig. 2. The same ovary cut open.

a. Old corpus luteum.

b. Ruptured Graafian vesicle in process of transformation into a corpus luteum.


Fig. 3. Corpus luteiim of the unimpregnated cow at its maximum of development. External view. (Obs. 21.)

Fig. 4. Same as the above. Internal view.

Fig. 5. Corpus luteum of the unimpregnated cow beginning to retrograde. External view. (Obs. 22.)

Plate IV

Fig. 1. Same as the above. Internal view.

Fig. 2. Corpus luteum of a cow about three and a half months pregnant. (Obs. 23.)

Fig. 3. Corpus luteum of a cow eight months pregnant. (Obs. 26.)

Fig. 4. Corpus luteum of the unimpregnated ewe at its maximum of development. a. External view. b. Internal view.

Fig. 5. a. Ovary of an unimpregnated ewe ; showing the aperture of a recentlyruptured Graafian vesicle, and the prominence of the last corpus luteum. b. The same ovary cut open ; showing the last corpus luteum.

Fig. 6. a. Ovary of a ewe, the uterus of which contained a foetus eight and a half inches in length. b. The same ovary cut open.


Embryology - 25 Jun 2019    Facebook link Pinterest link Twitter link  Expand to Translate  
Google Translate - select your language from the list shown below (this will open a new external page)

العربية | català | 中文 | 中國傳統的 | français | Deutsche | עִברִית | हिंदी | bahasa Indonesia | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | မြန်မာ | Pilipino | Polskie | português | ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਦੇ | Română | русский | Español | Swahili | Svensk | ไทย | Türkçe | اردو | ייִדיש | Tiếng Việt    These external translations are automated and may not be accurate. (More? About Translations)

Dalton JC Prize essay on the corpus luteum of menstruation and pregnancy. (1851) Philadelphia: T.K. and P.G. Collins.

Online Editor  
Mark Hill.jpg
This historic 1851 paper by Dalton is a very early historic description of the corpus luteum.



See also - Lee R. On the structure of the corpus luteum. (1839) Med Chir Trans. 22: 329-37. PMID 20895693

Modern Notes: corpus luteum

Menstrual Cycle Links: Introduction | menstrual histology | ovary | corpus luteum | oocyte | uterus | Uterine Gland | estrous cycle | pregnancy test
Historic Embryology - Menstrual 
1839 Corpus Luteum Structure | 1851 Corpus Luteum | 1933 Pap Smear | 1937 Corpus Luteum Hormone | 1942 Human Reproduction Hormones | 1951 Corpus Luteum | 1969 Ultrastructure of Development and Regression | 1969 Ultrastructure during Pregnancy
Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)
  Corpus Luteum 1851: Part 1 - Corpus Luteum of Menstruation | Part 2 - Corpus Luteum of Pregnancy | Part 3 - Observations on Animals | Plates