Book - Contributions to Embryology Carnegie Institution No.29

From Embryology

On The Widespread Occurrence Of Reticular Fibrils Produced By Capillary Endothelium

By George W. Corner,

Assistant Professor of Anatomy in the University of California.


With two plates.


Links: Carnegie Institution of Washington - Contributions to Embryology


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)


Introduction

In adding his contribution to those here gathered, the writer deems it most appropriate to present a study which not only took origin during the course of an investigation suggested by Dr. Mall, but which led back into another field that he had made particularly his own, and in which his interest and advice would have been most eagerly sought, had a happier providence allowed.

In one of his best-known and most important papers Dr. Mall, in 1891, announced his discovery that the framework of many organs and tissues of the mammalian body is composed neither of white fibrous nor of yellow elastic connective tissue, but of a third tj^De of supporting substance composed of fine interlacing fibrils wliich not only differ from the white fibers in appearance, but are more resistant to both acid and alkahne solvents and are not so readily attacked by digestive ferments. He applied the name "reticulum" to the new tissue because the fibrils of the lymph-nodes, already bearing this name, were the first which he found to present the characteristics just mentioned. The supporting fibrils of the spleen, gastric and intestinal mucosa, liver, lung, thyroid, heart-muscle, the basement membranes of the testis, and the entire supporting structure of the kidney, including the basement-membranes, were all demonstrated in tliis first paper to be of the same type. That the internal connective tissue of many other organs falls in the same category was later shown in publications by various of Mall's pupils, of which the most interesting in the present connection are those upon the corpus luteum by J. G. Clark (1898),- and the adrenal gland by J. M. Flint (1900). In 1902 Mall pubhshed his important account of the development of the connective tissues, showing that in the intestine, and presumably in other organs, the reticular fibrils are developed within the cytoplasm of the mesenchymal syncytium.


To this last statement, however, he noted one striking exception. In the liver the reticulum arises from von Kupfler's endothelial cells :


"The observations upon the development of the reticulum of the liver are entirely out of harmony with those of the development of connective tissue elsewhere. In all other places the syncytium arises from the mesenchyme, but here it is from the endothelial lining of blood vessels The fibrils are in no way connected with the liver cells and true mesenchyme cells are not present at all."

This discovery was confirmed by J. Kon in 1908,\ A denial by ]\Iadame Schumkow-Trubin (1909) would seem to be erroneous; the present writer's preparations agree with the description of Mail and Kon.

After the work of several investigators had proved the identity of the fibrils shown in the Uver by the digestion method with the "Gitterfasern" long since observed by Henle and Kupffer, for which Oppel had in 1890 discovered a method of selective impregnation by a silver-chromate method, further proof of Mall's conclusions as to the difference between reticulum and white connective tissue was afforded by the application of Bielsehowsky's silver-nitrate method to the staining of these tissues. As shown by Ferguson (1912), successful impregnation of adult tissues gives a totally distinct coloration of the two kinds of fibers.



Content to be added----


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)


Glossary Links

Glossary: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Numbers | Symbols | Term Link

Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, December 9) Embryology Book - Contributions to Embryology Carnegie Institution No.29. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_Contributions_to_Embryology_Carnegie_Institution_No.29

What Links Here?
© Dr Mark Hill 2019, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G