Book - Buchanan's Manual of Anatomy including Embryology

From Embryology
Embryology - 7 Aug 2020    Facebook link Pinterest link Twitter link  Expand to Translate  
Google Translate - select your language from the list shown below (this will open a new external page)

العربية | català | 中文 | 中國傳統的 | français | Deutsche | עִברִית | हिंदी | bahasa Indonesia | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | မြန်မာ | Pilipino | Polskie | português | ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਦੇ | Română | русский | Español | Swahili | Svensk | ไทย | Türkçe | اردو | ייִדיש | Tiếng Việt    These external translations are automated and may not be accurate. (More? About Translations)

A personal message from Dr Mark Hill (May 2020)  
Mark Hill.jpg
I have decided to take early retirement in September 2020. During the many years online I have received wonderful feedback from many readers, researchers and students interested in human embryology. I especially thank my research collaborators and contributors to the site. The good news is Embryology will remain online and I will continue my association with UNSW Australia. I look forward to updating and including the many exciting new discoveries in Embryology!

Frazer JE. Buchanan's Manual of Anatomy, including Embryology. (1937) 6th Edition. Bailliere, Tindall And Cox, London.

Buchanan's Manual of Anatomy: I. Terminology and Relative Positions | II. General Embryology | III. Osteology | IV. Bones of Trunk | V. Bones of Head | VI. Bones of Upper Limb | VII. Bones of Lower Limb | VIII. Joints | IX. The Upper Limb | X. Lower Limb | XI. The Abdomen | XII. The Thorax | XIII. Development of Vascular Systems | XIV. The Head and Neck | XV. The Nervous System | XVI. The Eye | XVII. The Ear | Glossary
Online Editor  
Mark Hill.jpg
This 1937 textbook edited by Prof Frazer is the 6th edition of Alexander MacGregor Buchanan's (1844-1915) historic textbook.


Internet Archive

Alexander Macgregor Buchanan - Obituary Notice 
Alexander MacGregor Buchanan (1844-1915)

Alexander Macgregor Buchanan, M.D. Glasc., F.R.F.P.S.G.

By the death of Dr. Alex. M. Buchanan the cause of extra-mural medical teaching in Glasgow has lost one of its chief supporters, while the loss to the Anderson College of Medicine, where for the last forty-one years he acted as Professor of Anatomy, is simply incalculable. Other professors and lecturers might come and go, adorning its class-rooms for a few years till they were provided for elsewhere; but Dr. Buchanan was a fixture. His name became as well known as that of the College itself, and admiring students, infected by the reports of their predecessors, came in numbers every year to study anatomy in his rooms. He had a great reputation as a teacher of anatomy, and he well deserved it. He had a long and varied training for the post he so long held and adorned.


Born in 1844, Dr. Buchanan was educated at the High School, Glasgow, was dux of the junior division of the late Dr. M‘Kindlay’s Latin class, 1855-60, and captured all the first prizes and medals open to him. He entered the University of Glasgow in 1860, graduating in Arts in 1864, taking the degrees of M.B., C.M. four years later, and that of M.D. in 1871. In 1874 he became a Fellow of the Royal Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, and at the time of his death was the oldest member of its board of examiners. As a student of anatomy he studied under the late Professor Allen Thomson and Dr. Mitchell Banks, afterwards the eminent anatomist and surgeon of Liverpool. As soon as he graduated he was appointed Senior Demonstrator of Anatomy by Professor Allen Thomson, and held this post for four years. During this period he formed that method of lecturing and demonstrating which he afterwards carried out so brilliantly in the Anderson College. At the close of his demonstratorship he spent two years as house surgeon and house physician in the Royal Infirmary, thus gaining a thorough knowledge both of surgery and medicine, and especially of the points which could be most aptly illustrated in his anatomical lectures. In 1874 he was appointed to the Chair of Anatomy in Anderson’s College Medical School on the promotion of the late Professor George Buchanan to the Chair of Clinical Surgery in the University.


In his new Chair Dr. Buchanan had but one aim—to become a great teacher of anatomy. He was a brilliant dissector, and though much less of an artist than his great teacher, Professor Allen Thomson, he had imbibed much of the latter’s skill at the black-board. He made not only clear pictures in chalk, but every specimen he demonstrated was converted by his scalpel into a picture designed to show without confusion the points he wished to insist on, and such that no student could fail to recognise and understand every topic prelected on. His students were the first to perceive the artistic clearness and precision of every demonstration, and were often heard to say, as they left his class-room, “ Well, we have learnt a lot to-day.” His style and manner in lecturing were formed partly after those of Professor Allen Thomson, but also, and to a greater degree, on those of Thiedemann, of Heidelburg, for whom Dr. Buchanan frequently expressed the greatest admiration. In 1906 Dr. Buchanan published a Manual of Anatomy in two handsome volumes, fully illustrated by drawings, some original, others from many different sources. The descriptions given are in his most characteristic style—short, terse, and clear, suited to the wants of students.


The work he did for the Anderson College was manifold. His teaching maintained and even advanced its reputation, and this was recognised alike by his students and by his colleagues, who from the oldest to the youngest regarded him as a source of strength both in their councils and in the daily performance of the duties of his chair. On the removal of the College to its present position his labours on its behalf were exceptionally arduous and fruitful, and he was of the utmost assistance by the practical aid he gave in the work of its building and establishment.


His Manual of Anatomy was not only an aid to learners far beyond the limits of the College, but its graphie and clear descriptions attracted within the walls many students desirous of sitting at the feet of one in whose hands the study of anatomy could be rendered so perspicuous and so attractive. Those who had learnt of him became in their turn further messengers of his fame; and it is no exaggeration to say that there are former students of his in every part of the world to bear testimony to the value of his work, and to grieve at the news of his decease.


Held as he was by all in high estimation as a teacher and scientific worker, the pleasures of familiar intercourse with him were amplified by the ease and affability of his relations alike with colleagues and students. Dignity and courtesy were ever the characteristics of his association with them, and those among them who knew him more intimately entertained for him feelings of a warmth perhaps somewhat unusual between teacher and taught.


In addition to the work of his Chair, Dr. Buchanan occupied for fifteen years the post of Freeland Lecturer on Anatomy and Physiology in the Anderson College, the lectures being directed towards the teaching of the general principles of these subjects to laymen. In this popular branch of his subject he was no less successful than in its scientific exposition, and his course attracted large numbers of the laity to the Anderson College. These lectures are now included in the course of the Technical College. Froin 1890 to 1896 he was Examiner in Anatomy to the University of Glasgow, and for many years, as has been already indicated, he was examiner in that subject to the Royal Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons.


Many years ago Dr. Buchanan’s health broke down, and, though he partially recovered, he had been in recent years more or less of an invalid. He was able to discharge the duties of his Chair till last summer. His death on 9th November was rather unexpected, and to the many students who loved him with a whole-hearted affection it will come as the news of the loss of a dear and intimate friend.


The following is a list of Dr. Buchanan’s publications :—

  • Well-marked lobulation of kidneys in a human adult, Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, 1892.
  • Use of peroxide of hydrogen in the preparation of bones, Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, 1893.
  • Diverticulum of small intestine, Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, 1894.
  • Abnormal cecum and vermiform appendix, Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, 1894.
  • Calcareous body from burse over patella, Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, 1894.
  • Abnormal sternum, Journal of Anatomy and Physiology,
  • Manual of Anatomy, Systematic and Practical, including Embryology, two volumes, 1906.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5911897/


See also: Historic Embryology Textbooks

Modern Notes: Embryology Textbooks

Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic" (textbooks, papers, people, recommendations) appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms, interpretations and recommendations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Buchanan's Manual of Anatomy including Embryology

Sixth Edition


Edited By

J E. Frazer, D.Sc., F.R.C.S.

Professor Of Anatomy, University Of London; Lecturer In Anatomy, St. Mary’s Hospital; Examiner In Anatomy To The University Of London, And Formerly Examiner At Cambridge, Durham And Oxford, And To The Royal College Of Surgeons

London


Bailliere, Tindall And Cox
Alexander Macgregor Buchanan.jpg

Alexander MacGregor Buchanan (1844-1915)

Preface To Sixth Edition

File:John Ernest Frazer.jpg
J. Ernest Frazer (1870-1946)

The necessity for a new edition of this Manual has afforded the opportunity of bringing its terminology into line with other English textbooks. The old English nomenclature, which has been used in the book from the first, is therefore replaced by the new Birmingham Revision throughout—except to some extent in the Embryological Section.

For many years the student will come across the terms of yesterday in his clinical and other textbooks and papers. For this reason, and because he should not be cut off from the advantage of study of the great teachers of past times, it has been considered necessary to introduce as subsidiaries the more common and popular terms used up to the present; having been once mentioned, they are not as a rule employed again. Other terms of such sort, particularly those connected with proper names, can be found in the Glossary. Otherwise there have been general revision of the text, some rearrangement, a small amount of new matter inserted, and a number of new illustrations added.

I am indebted to Mr. T. K. Elliott for the greater part of the change of terminology and for the Index, and to the Publishers for their unfailing readiness and help in all the questions concerned in the production of this edition.

J. E. FRAZER.

London,

February, 1937.


Table of Contents

I. Terminology and Relative Positions

II. General Embryology

THE ANIMAL CELL ......... 8

CELL-DIVISION ......... 9

GERM-CELLS . ......... 12

FERTILIZATION OF OVUM ....... 20

DEVELOPMENT OF OVUM . . . . . . .26

EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT ....... 33

BROAD OUTLINES OF ORGANOGENY ...... 53

INTRA-UTERINE CONDITIONS . . . . , , . IO4

GENERAL GROWTH . . . . . . . . IIO

III. Osteology

INTRODUCTORY . . . . . . . . . II3

IV. Bones of Trunk

VERTEBRAL COLUMN . . . . . . . 125

RIBS AND CARTILAGES . . . . . . , -154

STERNUM . . . . . . . . . .160

THORAX AS A WHOLE ........ 165

DEVELOPMENT OF TRUNK BONES . . . . . 167

V. Bones of Head

occipital . . . . . . . . . .172

THE MAXILL.E . . . . . . . . 2 JI

HYOID . . . . . . . . . . .235

SKULL AS A WHOLE . . . . . . . .237

REGIONS .......... 242

INTERIOR OF CRANIUM ........ 259

FCETAL SKULL ......... 265

RACIAL PECULIARITIES ........ 268

DEVELOPMENT OF SKULL ....... 270

TEETH, WITH DEVELOPMENT ....... 278

VI. Bones of Upper Limb

VII. Bones of Lower Limb

hip bone .......... 334

THE PELVIS ......... 342

FEMUR .......... 345

LEG AND FOOT . . . . . . . • *355

VIII. Joints

GENENA1 .......... 392

IX. The Upper Limb

back . .......... 397

PECTORAL REGION . . . . . .. . 412

AXILLA . . . . . . . , . .422

ARM . .......... 446

SHOULDER-JOINT ......... 461

FOREARM AND HAND ........ 465

DEVELOPMENT AND MORPHOLOGY . . . . . -515

JOINTS.516

X. Lower Limb

GLUTEAL REGION . . . . . . . , .529

BACK OF THIGH ......... 540

FRONT AND INNER SIDE OF THIGH ...... 551

HIP-JOINT.590

LEG .... 598

KNEE-JOINT .......... 628

SOLE OF FOOT.64 1

TIBIO-FIBULAR JOINTS ........ 659

XI. The Abdomen

PERINEUM.674

ABDOMINAL WALL ......... 704

INGUINAL HERNIA ......... 745

ABDOMINAL CAVITY ........ 754

INTESTINAL STRUCTURE ........ 856

DEVELOPMENTAL POSITIONS ....... 874

LIVER AND OTHER VISCERA ....... 884

MALE PELVIS.^4

FEMALE PELVIS ......... 965

PELVTC ARTICULATIONS ....... 988

XII. The Thorax

WALL .......... 994

THORACIC CAVITY ......... 1002

MEDIASTINUM ......... IOTI

HEART .......... IO48

DEVELOPMENT . . . . . . . . . TO73

OTHER CONTENTS ......... 1085

VERTEBRAL JOINTS. lI0 5

JOINTS OF RIBS, COSTAL CARTILAGES, AND STERNUM . . ITIO

XIII. Development of Vascular Systems

PRINCIPAL ARTERIES AND VEINS . . . . . . IIl6

PRINCIPAL VEINS . . . . . . . . II23

INFERIOR VENA CAVA ........ II33

LYMPHATIC SYSTEM . . . . . . . .II37

XIV. The Head and Neck

BACK OF SCALP AND NECK . . . . . . . II4T

SCALP AND TEMPORAL REGION ...... II53

BASAL PART OF CRANIAL CAVITY . . . . . . 1162

SIDE OF THE NECK . . . . . . . . II7I

CONTENTS OF ORBIT ........ I247

FACE .......... 1263

TEMPORAL AND INFRATEMPORAL REGIONS .... I3OI

DEEP DISSECTION OF NECK ....... 1 323

MOUTH CAVITY ......... 1335

NASAL CAVITY ......... I356

PHARYNX .......... 1366

DEVELOPMENT ......... 1373

LARYNX .......... 1379

PREVERTEBRAL MUSCLES . . . . . . . 1397

JOINTS OF ATLAS, AXIS, AND OCCIPITAL BONE . . . I4O4

XV. The Nervous System

SPINAL CORD ......... 1410

EXTERNAL CHARACTERS . . . . . . . I416

INTERNAL STRUCTURE ....... I42O

DEVELOPMENT ......... I436

encephalon: parts ........ 1442

SUPERFICIAL ORIGINS OF CRANIAL NERVES .... 1 446

rhombencephalon: medulla . . . . . .1451

PONS .......... 1468

CEREBELLUM ......... 1475

THE FOURTH VENTRICLE ....... I488

telencephalon: hemispheres ...... 1493

OLFACTORY LOBE AND RHINENCEPHALON . . . . I5IO

LATERAL VENTRICLE . . . . . . . 1522

BASAL GANGLIA ........ I 5 26

THIRD VENTRICLE ........ 1533

MESENCEPHALON ........ 1547

STRUCTURE OF CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES .... 1561

VESSELS JO F ENCEPHALON ...... I57O

DEVELOPMENT OF ENCEPHALON . . . . . . 1581

DEVELOPMENT OF PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM . . 1597

MENINGES OF ENCEPHALON CRANIAL NERVES CRANIO-CEREBRAL TOPOGRAPHY AUTONOMIC SYSTEM .

XVI. The Eye

COATS ....

REFRACTING MEDIA DEVELOPMENT

XVII. The Ear

EXTERNAL EAR .

MIDDLE EAR INTERNAL EAR MEMBRANOUS LABYRINTH DEVELOPMENT OF EAR

GLOSSARY ....