Book - An Atlas of the Medulla and Midbrain - Reconstruction General Summary

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Sabin FR. and Knower H. An atlas of the medulla and midbrain, a laboratory manual (1901) Baltimore: Friedenwald.

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This 1901 book by Florence Rena Sabin (1871 - 1953) and her collaborator presents one of the very earliest atlases of the human central nervous system, describing the midbrain and brainstem. This atlas was extremely useful for later researchers attempting to both understand the development and mapping of the midbrain and medulla. Florence Sabin later work was as a key historic researcher in early 1900's establishing our early understanding of both vascular and lymphatic development in the embryo.



Modern Notes: Medulla | Mesencephalon | Florence Sabin

Neural Links: ectoderm | neural | neural crest | ventricular | sensory | Stage 22 | gliogenesis | neural fetal | Medicine Lecture - Neural | Lecture - Ectoderm | Lecture - Neural Crest | Lab - Early Neural | neural abnormalities | folic acid | iodine deficiency | Fetal Alcohol Syndrome | Postnatal | Postnatal - Neural Examination | Histology | Historic Neural | Category:Neural


Neural Tube Development
Neural Tube Primary Vesicles Secondary Vesicles Adult Structures
week 3 week 4 week 5 adult
neural plate
neural groove
neural tube

Brain
prosencephalon telencephalon Rhinencephalon, Amygdala, Hippocampus, Cerebrum (Cortex), Hypothalamus, Pituitary | Basal Ganglia, lateral ventricles
Diencephalon Epithalamus, Thalamus, Subthalamus, Pineal, third ventricle
mesencephalon mesencephalon Tectum, Cerebral peduncle, Pretectum, cerebral aqueduct
rhombencephalon metencephalon pons, cerebellum
myelencephalon medulla oblongata
spinal cord
Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
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Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)

Conclusion General Summary

It will now be possible, I think, to reduce the model to simple summary of terms, even though it may seem to be complex. As viewed from the side, the model consists, in general, of two levels a ventral J and a dorsal. The ventral level is characterized, first, by a remarkable absence of medullated fibres at this stage of development, and second, by the presence of large definite nuclei. These nuclei characterize the regions they occupy; the olive of the medulla,


Comparison the pontal nuclei, the nucleus ruber and substantia nigra in the withcSS! midbrain. This is the level and these the structures by which the medulla oblongata, pons and midbrain differ from the cord. The absence of medullated fibres speaks for the later development of these structures. This level is eventually occupied by the brachium pontis and the pyramidal tract, the fibres of which have long been laid down at this period. 1


The pyramidal tract, which develops in this level, lies wholly on the surface of this region, save where it plunges through the pontal nuclei. It lies far from the dorsal area, which represents the more developed part of the model and has no form relation to it save that the decussation makes a slight impression on the trough for the ventral horn; that is to say, the pyramidal tract has no influence in moulding the shape of other structures; it rather adjusts itself to structures already formed. In this it is in contrast to the sensory tract, which is so closely related in form to adjacent structures. This illustrates well the point which His has made, that the difference in time development determines the relative positions of structure. 2


Continuation The dorsal half of the model, on the other hand, corresponds structures, rather to the spinal cord. The easy transition of the cord into the dorsal part of the model is clear in the view of the lateral surface of the model. This level, with all its complexity, is in reality simple. It consists (1) of long tracts on the way to the cortex, (2) of long tracts to the cerebellum, namely, the brachium conjunctivum and corpus restiforme; (3) of the cerebral nuclei, their root-bundles and paths; (4) the association areas or formatio reticularis alba and grisea.


The central fibre mass is a structural unit in the form of three sheets, the medulla, pontal and midbrain, which contain the medial and lateral lemniscus, or the main sensory path toward the cortex. It contains also certain shorter tracts, the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, the lemniscus superior and unnamed formatio reticularis fibres. Of the tracts to the cerebellum, the corpus restiforme lies on the lateral surface of the medulla oblongata, while the brachium conjunctivum, being related to the nucleus ruber, lies within the pons and midbrain.


1 Flechsig. Die Leitungsbahnen im Geblrn und Kiickenmark des Menschen, Leipzig, 1876, S. 192.

2 Die Neuroblasten und deren Entstehung im embryonalen Mark, Abhandl. d. math.-phys. Cl. d. k. sachs. Gesellsch. d. Wissensch., Bd. xv, Leipzig, 1889, S. 292.


SUMMARY: GROUPING OF CEREBRAL NERVES, ETC. Ill

The cerebral nerves are divided into two groups, a medial and a Grouping of lateral. The motor nuclei are definite, compact masses, with the C( exception of the nucleus ~N. accessorii, which represents the transition from the type of the nuclei to the spinal cord. The motor nuclei correspond to the ventral-horn cells. They are related to f ormatio reticularis areas ; the median group to the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, the lateral to the formatio reticularis alba. The root-fibres of the lateral group, with one exception, take an indirect course to the surface, showing that they have developed in an area of complex growth. The sensory nuclei all belong to the lateral group. They correspond, in the main, to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, and thus occupy a dorsal level. They are diffuse and cover a wide area. All but two of them, namely, the nuclei of the !N". trigeminus and !N". cochleae, lie in the substantia centralis grisea. With the exception of the nuclei N. cochleae, they border the formatio reticularis. In general, they are characterized by long descending tracts accompanied by nuclei. The nerves of the special senses do not conform wholly to the general type, for the !N". vestibuli is peculiar in its relations to the cerebellum, and the "N. cochleae in its well-developed and complex central path.

The formatio reticularis consists of mixed cells and fibres. The Formatio dorsal level represents the longer association paths of the model, rt and its cells are diffuse. In the ventral level the fibres are grouped into shorter paths and then the cells form nuclei in connection with these short bundles.

The model brings out the fact that the region is divided into four levels, as has been shown by His from a study of earlier embryos. I wish to emphasize the large number of nerves represented by nuclei in the first layer, or the substantia centralis grisea. They are (1) all of the spinal nerves through the nuclei of the dorsal funiculi, (2) the nuclei of the four motor nerves of the median group, and (3) all of the sensory cerebral nuclei of the model except the nucleus of the !N". trigeminus and the N. cochleae. The second layer, that of the formatio reticularis, includes the remaining four motor nuclei of the cerebral nerves. That this position is not primary for these nuclei, but is rather the result of development, is suggested by courses of their fibres. The third layer includes the olive, pontal nuclei, substantia nigra and red nucleus, the fourth the pyramidal tract.

The question of the origin of these four layers is one of great interest. According to His, the motor nuclei, both of the median and lateral groups, come from the ground plate, while the sensory nuclei come from the medial part of the wing plates. 1 The third layer offers an attractive field for study.

Three of its nuclei, namely, the olive, the pontal nuclei and the red nucleus, are connected with the cerebellum. In the spinal cord the cells related to the cerebellum are in the nucleus dorsalis Clarkii which lies between the dorsal and ventral horns. The origin of the olive, according to His, is from the cells of the Rautenlippe, which forms the lateral part of the wing plate adjacent to the cells which form the sensory nuclei. This serves to open up the question of the origin and relations of this ventral nuclear layer. Have these nuclei a common origin, and what is the relation of the substantia nigra to the other three?

A part of this question is being studied in this laboratory. Problems along this line have been opened up by the work of His, and I can but believe that the application of the wax-plate method to the study of the development of the central nervous system has a promising future. With a series of models, the course of development may become a matter of sight and not a theory. Moreover, all those individual differences which may be misleading in any one model can be easily eliminated when each model is but one of a series.

1 His, W., Die Entwickehing des menschlichen EautenWms. Abhandl. d. math.-phys. Cl. d. k. sachs. Gesell. d. Wissensch., Leipz., 1891, S. 1-74.


Historic Disclaimer - information about historic embryology pages 
Mark Hill.jpg
Pages where the terms "Historic Textbook" and "Historic Embryology" appear on this site, and sections within pages where this disclaimer appears, indicate that the content and scientific understanding are specific to the time of publication. This means that while some scientific descriptions are still accurate, the terminology and interpretation of the developmental mechanisms reflect the understanding at the time of original publication and those of the preceding periods, these terms and interpretations may not reflect our current scientific understanding.     (More? Embryology History | Historic Embryology Papers)


An Atlas of the Medulla and Midbrain (1901): Chapter I. Introductory | Chapter II. The Long Tracts | Chapter III. The Columns Of The Spinal Cord | Chapter IV. Cerebellar Peduncles | Chapter V. The Cerebral Nerves And Their Nuclei | Chapter VI. The Cerebral Nerves And Their Nuclei (Continued). Lateral Group | Chapter VII. The Inferior And Accessory Olives | Chapter VIII. The Midbrain | Chapter IX. The Formatio Reticularis Alba And Grisea | General Summary of what Is shown In Reconstruction | References To Literature | Abbreviations | Description of Figures and Plates


Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2019, July 18) Embryology Book - An Atlas of the Medulla and Midbrain - Reconstruction General Summary. Retrieved from https://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php/Book_-_An_Atlas_of_the_Medulla_and_Midbrain_-_Reconstruction_General_Summary

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